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Thread: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

  1. #81

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Quote Originally Posted by OMB View Post
    3 From Hell be a cool tribute to Sid if you get chance
    I've considered it seeing that it's now out on VOD and I've covered the other two movies in past Fright Fests, but man, I'm not a fan of what Zombie has been creating over the last decade. Is it much of a tribute to Haig when he's barely in the movie and I may hate the movie? I'm leaning more towards watching Spider Baby to tribute Haig instead.

  2. #82

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #10
    Title: Childís Play
    Country: United States/Canada/France
    Year: 2019
    Director: Lars Klevberg




    A popular tech doll will stop at nothing to ensure that he's his owner's best buddy until the end...


    The Childís Play franchise was one of the most important horror series in my life. Some of the earliest horror movies I can remember watching were the original three movies with Childís Play 2 remaining in my top ten favorite horror movies. Sadly, itís also a franchise that has disappointed me quite a bit. After seemingly reinvigorating the franchise in 1998 with Bride of Chucky, the series took a sharp downturn once the original writer, Don Mancini, regained control of the franchise and began pumping out multiple Chucky films where he was both the writer and director. When looking at my ranking of the Childís Play/Chucky series, the three films that Mancini directed - Seed of Chucky, Curse of Chucky, and Cult of Chucky, were ranked in the final three spots.

    When the initial news came out that Childís Play would be receiving a remake, I know that a lot of people were not pleased, but I found myself curious and even excited. The franchise desperately needed a fix after the Mancini trilogy because the franchise was becoming straight to video trash filled with over the top characters and a lack of sense of realism. Realism, I recognize is a bit silly to bring up in a franchise revolving around a killer doll that tries to use voodoo to put its soul into a humanís body, but the last couple films still felt very manufactured to me. That is to say that it felt like you were watching a movie, rather than the other films where youíre watching a fictional tale set in the real world. If that makes any sense that is. Another benefit to being okay with the idea of a remake is that Iím not a huge fan of the original Childís Play. While still much better than the Mancini directed films, the original Mancini written film lacks Chucky having as much fun as he would in the middle of the franchise. My idea of an ideal Childís Play was Chucky up to his usual hijinx right from the start with the audience joining along for the ride. The original Childís Play built up the mystery of whether or not Charles Lee Ray was successful in transferring his soul into the plastic body of a doll instead of foregoing it in favor of the fun value. So this was truly a unique situation where I cared about a horror franchise quite a bit, but it was the perfect situation to entice me into wanting to see a remake.

    In the lead up to the release of the 2019 remake, I was hoping that the film would distance itself from the original series. After all, despite bringing back the original name, not casting Brad Dourif as Chuckyís voice for the first time in the franchise is quite the jarring change. Especially with Mancini trying to keep his zany franchise going with Dourif and company, it made sense to me to make the remake stand out more. I was all for giving the doll a new name and to alter the look. Instead, and I have to assume that this is done for the purposes of marketing, the killer dollís name is still Chucky and the design is close enough to the standard Chucky look. Despite wanting to see changes, by the end of this remake, I did feel as if the film was so different from the other Chucky films that maybe it didnít need to be called Childís Play? Instead, it resembles a film obviously inspired by the Chucky films, but itís not a Chucky movie. Except...they got away with using the Chucky name and design?

    For me, the realism finally returned to the Childís Play series as the world and its characters feel authentic to me. That does come with a caveat though. The movie might be released in 2019, but its world is sometime in the near future. The world isnít so much different that it resembled a Black Mirror episode more than todayís world, but the technology, especially the publicís ability to use it, was a little advanced for 2019. This is where the remake channels its inner-Terminator by trying to warn its viewers that their over reliance on technology, especially all from the same company, essentially gives total control of your life over to that sole company - or by someone who is able to hack into your account. Take your pick, was Kaslan more of a play on Amazon or Google? Either one fits well, although personally I was reminded of Amazon more so than Google.

    Something I was not expecting in the slightest was just how sweet Childís Play would be. The new Chucky is downright adorable at points, particularly in the first half when Andy is teaching his new buddy various things from putting on a scary face to unknowingly learning the stabbing motion. Thereís also that damn song. Is the Buddi song cheesy? Absolutely, but itís also sweet and painfully catchy. Mark Hamill stepping in for Brad Dourif ended up being a fantastic replacement as Hamill was able to at times put on a voice in which it garnered sympathy for his Chucky. Considering how truly evil and vile Dourifís Chucky was, I appreciated seeing a different version of Chucky in that there was just something about this new Chucky that made me feel sorry for it. With Dourif, I wanted him to get his way because he was overloaded with personality and charisma. Hamillís relies on being a little pathetic, but even when he begins to kill, his intentions are pure. He just wants to be Andyís best buddy, itís that his flawed logic sees the likelihood of being Andyís friend increases if he kills everyone in Andyís life. Iím not saying Iíd ever want someone to kill people in my life in order to be my best buddy, but MAYBE itís a little bit flattering that someone wants to be your best buddy to that degree. Speaking of sweet, one thing lacking in the Mancini films were likable characters. Childís Play completely remedies it with multiple characters that I found genuinely likable. Andy and his mom were both great and Det. Mike and his mother brought some comedy value to the film. When it came to the threat of losing one or more of them, I didnít want to see them die. The drawback is that I did feel as if the other teenagers were underdeveloped. I do really enjoy the scene in which Andy and his new friends are sitting back and laughing at the over the top craziness of Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. Itís such a relatable scene that I imagine most of us have experienced when we were younger.

    With the last couple Chucky films having such low budgets, the films relied far too much on CGI when it came to the kills. The result was pretty unsatisfying deaths that felt fake. The remakeís budget may have been a modest ten million dollars, but the extra money made the kills look so much better. Childís Play is a really bloody film that relishes in being able to showcase some gore. Itís great fun and thereís multiple scenes that had me squimishing. Without giving away the scenes, the two that stand out the most that got the biggest reaction out of me was the result of someone falling off of a house and a table saw. Both were quite bloody and I felt the pain just watching the scenes.

    Although I donít think itís a perfect film, I also donít have any really notable problems. Trying to think of negatives, the only thing that springs to mind was the fact that Andy wore a hearing aid. The hearing aid was brought up multiple times, but ultimately it didnít serve any purpose. Traditionally in films, when an object is referenced multiple times, itís to inform the viewer that itís important for them to remember said object because itís going to play a role in the ending. A Quiet Place is a great example of a recent horror film which showcased a hearing aid (Well, a cochlear implant) that played a role in the ending. Maybe Childís Play was just showcasing a character with a disability that serves no purpose to just be more inclusive? While I didnít have a problem with this, Childís Play did feel as if it was geared towards teens. Iím a bit surprised that it does have an R rating rather than PG-13, but the tone is still light and seeing as the main character is a thirteen year old boy, I would presume that teenagers can relate to whatís happening in the film than adults. Again, Iím okay with this tone, but I know that some prefers their horror to be more serious.

    Overall, was the 2019 Childís Play remake what I or others were wanting or expecting? Perhaps not, but what we got instead is something that I found to be pleasantly enjoyable. Although the aesthetics may resemble the previous Chucky films, this was something completely different. Perhaps a more apt title would have been, ďiBuddiĒ to emphasize the difference and the fact that technology played such a big role in the film. The new Chucky wasnít the little hellion that the original Chucky was, but I loved how adorable he could be. With plenty of bloody kills, a catchy song, and a lively story, I feel far more upbeat about a Chucky film than Iíve felt for ages. It may not be the type of Chucky film you grew up on, but itís the sort of Chucky film that I can see myself watching on a regular basis like I do with Childís Play 2, Childís Play 3, and Bride of Chucky.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, to shake things up a bit, let's take a look at horror's newest television show.

  3. #83
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    I just can't get past how stupid Chucky looks, I'll never watch that lol

  4. #84

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Creepshow
    Title: Gray Matter/The House of the Head
    Season: 1/Episode: 1
    Directors: Greg Nicotero and John Harrison




    A few years ago, one of the big pieces of horror news on the small screen was the anticipated return of Tales from the Crypt. The new series was set to be helmed by M. Night Shyamalan and would air weekly on the cable television network - TNT. The talk from the horror fans was generally mixed. There was plenty of excitement at the idea of seeing the Cryptkeeper returning, but then there were plenty of fears as well. For starters, Shyamalan is a fairly controversial figure in the world of horror. While his reputation was certainly great early on in his career, a string of less than well received films caused fans to second guess the talent of Shyamalan. Then there was the fact that Tales from the Crypt would be moved down to a basic cable station. While it does mean more viewers would have access to the show than if it was on HBO, like the previous incarnation of the series, it also meant that the series wouldnít be allowed to go as far as the original series went. Lastly, there was the upsetting news that the show wouldnít feature the Cryptkeeper at all. However, all speculation and/or fears proved to be unnecessary as the series just never happened with TNT opting to pass on the idea after seemingly ages of the status being up in the air.

    Little did anyone know at the time that while the future of Tales from the Crypt continues to look dead, the Cryptkeeper, of sorts, would not stay dead. Starting in October 2019, the online streaming service, Shudder, began airing a new weekly anthology series based around the 1982 movie, Creepshow. Technically speaking, the Creepshow TV series isnít Tales from the Crypt, but both the Creepshow film series and the original Tales from the Crypt television series was based on the classic EC comics of the 1950s. Hosted by the silent entity known as The Creep, each episode of Creepshow clocks in at forty minutes and is comprised of two stories.


    Gray Matter

    The very first story of the new Creepshow series felt highly appropriate when it came to bridging the film series and the television series together. One of the stars of the original movie, Adrienne Barbeau, happened to be the star of this story. Meanwhile, Stephen King wrote the script for the Creepshow movie while Gray Matter features countless references to Kingís various works. Half the fun of watching Gray Matter was just to try and spot all of the references. Some of the references are extremely noticeable such as using the names of some of Kingís most notable characters while other references merely physically resembles something from a King story. Without giving away the actual references, I spotted nods to IT, Storm of the Century, The Shining, and Cujo. I wouldnít be surprised if thereís additional ones that I just didnít pick up on with this first watch.

    The story, itself, is centered around a major storm about to hit a small town while a teenage boy seeks out help from the few remaining residents who chose to ride out the storm. It seems as if the boyís home life hasnít been too swell, but heís hesitant to reveal whatís been going on. While the chief of the police and his buddy goes to investigate, the boy is left to slowly reveal to the shop owner, played by Barbeau, the events that led to him fearing going home. Initially, the story is grounded in realism built around the loss of a loved one and alcoholism. The closer the story comes to reaching its climax, and by extension the closer the chief of police comes to the house of the boy, the true horror is revealed.

    I liked the story well enough. There seemed to be a mixture of practical effects and CGI for the big reveal, which should please old school horror fans that arenít the biggest fans of todayís over reliance of CGI. Although, obviously, the story was going to build to a reveal of something horrific, the intrigue of the episode was thanks to the uncertainty of what that reveal would be. This allowed for the story to have a sense of foreboding fear throughout the majority of the episode. Thereís not much by way of explanation, but the intention was geared towards just showing the shock of something unexpected, not diving deeper into understanding why it was possible. Iím not one to read horror comics, but I presume this show, not explain, is pretty standard for horror comics. Gray Matter was still a fine first episode, but one that I doubt will be among the best of the season.

    The House of the Head

    The second story of the first episode centers around a young girl and her dollhouse. The dollhouse is this beautiful, one of a kind dollhouse with three levels and every room is open for the girl to decorate in any way that she feels fit. The problem is that the girl would position the dolls before school or going out with her mother, only to find the dolls in different positions when sheíd go to check on her dollhouse after getting home. It seems as if all of the troubles in the dollhouse is caused by a detached head in the dollhouse with the little girl confused as to where the head came from in the first place.

    This story is brilliant. Iíd go as far as to call it one of the most creative horror stories of the year. On the surface, itís rather ordinary. Itís a haunted house story. The key to making it feel so creative is that it takes place entirely inside a dollhouse. The viewer only gets to see these snippets of the story due to only being shown the dollhouse when the girl checks on it. Much like Gray Matter having a sense of dread throughout, The House of the Head had a lot of anticipation whenever it was time to check on her dollhouse. Everything may happen inside of a dollhouse, but the horror doesnít hold back. Thereís bloody deaths and fear that stems from not being able to spot the detached head. The girl even buys additional dolls to try and help out her doll family, which adds to the anticipation to see what will happen when the girl checks on her toys the next time out. As I said, this plays out exactly like a haunted house story complete with the doll family feeling hopeless.

    The downside to this episode is that everything happens inside of a dollhouse. Itís a safe bet that thereís going to be horror fans hating this episode due to ďNothing happeningĒ to the real characters and how often the viewer has to wait until we receive updates on whatís happening inside of the dollhouse. Iíd compare it to reading a haunted house story compared to watching a haunted house movie. Both platforms tell the same story, but they go about telling those stories in very different ways. Reading forces you to use your imagination to envision whatís happening, The House of the Head goes one step further in forcing the viewer to use their imagination to not only envision whatís happening, but also envision how everyone is reacting to the terror in the house.

    Overall

    Out of the two stories, I preferred The House of the Head. While Gray Matter was enjoyable, it was more paint by numbers while House of the Head handled its common story in such a creative manner. The presentation of the episode was wonderful. The opening credits was overloaded with a lot of beautiful, bright colors. Throughout the episode, it kept cutting back to showing the story being told in the form of a comic book, like it did in the Creepshow movie. Ideally, I would prefer that The Creep would talk, but thatís just me wanting to see The Cryptkeeper again. From what I can remember in the original Creepshow movies, The Creep is treated the same here with his lack of talking. At this point in time, Shudder has released three episodes of Creepshow with a new episode being released every Wednesday. Thus far, Iíd say that itís well worth giving the anthology series a watch, especially if you grew up a fan of Tales from the Crypt.

    Fright in Motion:
    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, a film that shows the dangers of energy drinks.

  5. #85
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Gray Matter

    The very first story of the new Creepshow series felt highly appropriate when it came to bridging the film series and the television series together. One of the stars of the original movie, Adrienne Barbeau, happened to be the star of this story. Meanwhile, Stephen King wrote the script for the Creepshow movie while Gray Matter features countless references to Kingís various works. Half the fun of watching Gray Matter was just to try and spot all of the references. Some of the references are extremely noticeable such as using the names of some of Kingís most notable characters while other references merely physically resembles something from a King story. Without giving away the actual references, I spotted nods to IT, Storm of the Century, The Shining, and Cujo. I wouldnít be surprised if thereís additional ones that I just didnít pick up on with this first watch.

    The story, itself, is centered around a major storm about to hit a small town while a teenage boy seeks out help from the few remaining residents who chose to ride out the storm. It seems as if the boyís home life hasnít been too swell, but heís hesitant to reveal whatís been going on. While the chief of the police and his buddy goes to investigate, the boy is left to slowly reveal to the shop owner, played by Barbeau, the events that led to him fearing going home. Initially, the story is grounded in realism built around the loss of a loved one and alcoholism. The closer the story comes to reaching its climax, and by extension the closer the chief of police comes to the house of the boy, the true horror is revealed.

    I liked the story well enough. There seemed to be a mixture of practical effects and CGI for the big reveal, which should please old school horror fans that arenít the biggest fans of todayís over reliance of CGI. Although, obviously, the story was going to build to a reveal of something horrific, the intrigue of the episode was thanks to the uncertainty of what that reveal would be. This allowed for the story to have a sense of foreboding fear throughout the majority of the episode. Thereís not much by way of explanation, but the intention was geared towards just showing the shock of something unexpected, not diving deeper into understanding why it was possible. Iím not one to read horror comics, but I presume this show, not explain, is pretty standard for horror comics. Gray Matter was still a fine first episode, but one that I doubt will be among the best of the season.
    Gray Matter is based on the short story of the same name written by Stephen King. It is included in his Night Shift short story collection. Probably why they included all the references to other Stephen King stories.
    "There are three things I have learned never to discuss with people: religion, politics, and the Great Pumpkin."
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  6. #86

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    I just can't get past how stupid Chucky looks, I'll never watch that lol
    He just wants to be your buddy...

    Quote Originally Posted by ServantofTwilight View Post
    Gray Matter is based on the short story of the same name written by Stephen King. It is included in his Night Shift short story collection. Probably why they included all the references to other Stephen King stories.
    I found this out after the fact and I felt like a bit of a moron.

    In hindsight, there were far too many direct references to King's work for it not to be a King story. In my defense though, King isn't credited on IMDb.

  7. #87

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #12
    Title: Office Uprising
    Country: United States
    Year: 2018
    Director: Lin Oeding




    After a company introduces a new energy drink that turns its drinkers into raged induced maniacs, an office building becomes a battle ground of the infected battling each other and the handful of non-infected.


    Over the last few years, thereís been an uptick in office based survival horror movies. Most notably with the theatrical release of The Belko Experiment and to a lesser degree Mayhem. Iím not even entirely sure what prompted this development. Although Iím a fan of both Belko and Mayhem, neither were too successful or garnered a lot of talk. The difference between Office Uprising and the other two is that Uprising follows the same structure as the other two, but it heavily borrows its inspiration from Shaun of the Dead and Zombieland.

    Thereís points in Office Uprising which feels like a complete rip off of those grand horror comedies. Our main character, Desmond, is our stand in for Shaun. Heís a slacker with a heart of gold. Although a good guy, he just canít seem to find the gumption to find a bit of ambition. Not only does this cause problems in his work life, but it prevents him from dating his best friend, Samantha (Played by Donít Breatheís Jane Levy), because sheís got her life sorted out. When the horror kicks in and Desmondís workplace is littered with enraged zombie-like coworkers, heís so in his own world unaware of his environment that it takes him an extended amount of time before even realizing whatís been going on. For Zombieland, Desmond introduces his world at work by going over the rules to survive, just as Columbus did in Zombieland. I suppose if youíre going to be inspired to the point of near theft, you might as well steal from the best? Although I wouldnít call it one of the best, well after I finished watching Office Uprising, it occured to me that it also reminded me of the 80s film, Street Trash. Street Trash isnít a good movie, but itís well worth watching if youíre a fan of gnarly visuals due to its beautiful colors on display during each kill. Just like in Street Trash, the threat in Uprising comes from a drink. In the film, if you drink enough of this intense energy drink called Zolt, youíre going to be infected with a rage virus of sorts. Once infected, you are quick to attack and kill both infected and uninfected characters.

    Office Uprising is a pretty silly movie and at portions fairly stupid. Thereís a greater emphasis on comedy rather than horror, so the movie never goes too long without getting in a series of jokes. Truthfully, I found it funny enough though. Karan Soni (Dopinder from Deadpool) may not be a household name at this point, but heís starting to pop up in a lot of recent movies, always cast as the comedic and slightly pathetic best buddy of the main character. Here, Soni plays Mourad, the same sort of character that he always plays. However, I dig the actor and any movie heís in provides some extra laughs and additional entertainment for me. Iíll also give Office Uprising credit for not relying on raunchy humor that so many comedy movies relies on for cheap laughs. I donít have a problem with raunchy jokes, but thereís a strong over reliance on it to the point that it loses its comedic value in my eyes. Office Uprising may be silly, but thereís restraint.

    The biggest negative I felt towards Office Uprising is that the storytelling felt jumbled and at times incomplete. There were pieces of the film that felt as if it ended up on the cutting room floor. In the third act, itís concluded that Samantha, the sole member of the small group of survivors that drank half a can of Zolt, will be forever lost if a remedy isnít supplied within a half hour. That leds Desmond and Mourad through the office building to reach some supplies that is needed for the remedy. Yet, although weíre shown their trip to pick up the last ingredient, Desmond stays behind to fight off some of the rage infected while Mourad goes to deliver the last ingredient. Thereís a little bit of heart in the movie when it comes to Desmondís refusal to lose Samantha to this virus, so why is the viewer forced to miss out on the second half of the task? Itís a cliche scene, but showing such a scene where it seems as if help came too late to save Samantha only for her to suddenly return back to life would have been an effective way to add more emotion to the film. Thereís also the lack of showcasing of a character in both the pre-virus and post-virus world. In the pre-virus world, the viewer kept seeing a character by the name of Wendy, always popping up in the background when Desmond was at his desk. Unless I missed it, Wendy was never shown post-virus. Oddly enough, the entire HR department was only shown after the virus instead of being introduced in a normal day. Neither character may seem all that important, but it stands out as unusual to me. Likewise, Desmondís stoner video game that he had been working on prior to the virus didnít play a role in his survival once the outbreak began. At one point, Mourad referenced the game when they were collecting supplies, but it was a throw away line merely to keep the video game in the viewerís memory. What was the purpose of the video game? There wasnít one, just as there wasnít a purpose for Wendy. Office Uprising feels incomplete to me.

    Overall, for a stupid non-zombie zombie movie, Office Uprising was entertaining enough. Itís not the sort of movie you should go out of your way to see or pay to get the VOD, but it is the sort of movie you randomly play on Netflix on a rainy day. The film is overloaded with popular horror tropes that will remind you of superior films, but such tropes also makes the film a more comforting experience. Sometimes being just a popcorn flick is perfectly fine.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, the French shows just how sadistic children can be.

  8. #88

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #13
    Title: Ils
    Country: France/Romania
    Year: 2006
    Directors: David Moreau and Xavier Palud




    A group of sadistic attackers looks to play with a married couple out in the middle of nowhere...


    The mid to late 2000s was a grand time to be a horror fan. That is if you were hardcore enough of a fan that knew where to look to discover hidden gems. While Hollywood was riding the popularity of the torture porn sub-genre, Europe was finally stepping up again to create some memorable and intense horror movies. The best part is that it wasnít just one country in Europe that was doing this either. Spain had [REC] and The Orphanage. Norway had Fritt vilt and Dead Sno. Sweden had Let the Right One In. England had more mainstream hits like Shaun of the Dead, 28 Days Later, and The Descent, but also lesser known gems like Eden Lake. Yet, it was France that stood tall as the king of the European horrors of the 2000s by releasing the most intense and bloody films. Movies like High Tension, Inside, Frontier(s), and Martyrs terrified by showing the extreme lengths in which some twisted killers would be willing to go in order to fulfill their morbid goals. Whether it was because of the sheer shock value of what was shown on screen, such as in Martyrs, a film that I personally am not a fan of because it was too intense without any pay off, or by creating a disturbing enough idea, most notably done in Inside, these French films stayed with you. One of my favorite French horror films from this time period was Ils.

    Also known by its English language title, Them, Ils tells the story of a young couple out in their secluded country home where they are terrorized throughout the night by a pack of psychopaths. Watching Ils for just the second time, the first time in over a decade, I was surprised at how little action there actually was in the film. Despite only being a little over an hour and ten minutes long, thereís a long build up prior to any bloodshed. So why is it that the film is so tense? I think itís because the viewer knows that the couple, Clťmentine and Lucas, are not safe. The very first scene of the film showed a teenage girl terrorized inside of her motherís car by the unseen assailants. This scene went on for awhile with the assailants playing a game of cat and mouse, toying with their future victim, when in reality, they could have killed her at any point. For Lucas and Clťmentine, you know that theyíre in serious danger, even if it takes a while before the attacks begins.

    The actual house in the movie is almost like another main character. Itís absolutely massive, filled with multiple stories and rooms. Besides being an old house, itís also a house where some of it is in the middle of being under construction. Although itís an impressive sight, I question if itís too large of a house. It made it difficult to ever know where Clťmentine or Lucas were in the context of all of the other rooms. New areas were only introduced when one or both of them were on the run from their attackers. If decreasing the size of the house wasnít an option, then what about a tour at the start of the film? Whether it was with Clťmentine or Lucas or just going through the house while the opening credits played? Anything would have been more helpful than being tossed into this practical mansion and left to try to sort out where everyone is at any time. In fairness, perhaps this was the idea of the duo that wrote and directed the film, David Moreau and Xavier Palud? Keep the viewer disorganized to add to the tension. If the viewer doesnít know where in the house a character is or its proximity to other places/characters in the house, the viewer is never going to be able to be given a reprieve by thinking that the main characters are safe for the moment.

    Although the following is a massive spoiler, I donít feel as if one could discuss Ils without discussing the killers as it plays such a substantial role in making the film all the more unnerving. About three quarters of the way into Ils, itís revealed that one of the attackers is a teenager. Just before the end credits, the film reports that the attackers were all between the ages of ten to fifteen years old. In something that reminded me of Fulciís New York Ripper, a bizarre sound that the killers kept making was eventually identified as a simple noisemaker toy for children. These little punks were responsible for all of the brutal crimes committed in the film with their only explanations for their acts seemingly being that they wanted to have fun. The scariest killers in horror arenít the ones with extensive backstories or reasonings. Theyíre the ones that kill without provocation or reason. Think back to the Halloween series for proof of this. Michael was at his scariest in the first film when you didnít understand why he was doing everything he was doing. Once the franchise began explaining Michaelís reasoning with the family ties and the silly Thorn cult, it took away from the scares from knowing too much. The fact that thereís killers like this in real life makes the concept of them all the more terrifying. Sometimes, your sole mistake youíve made that leads to your untimely death is that you were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. As children are made out to be so innocent, it made the reveal all the more shocking. Thereís a lot of horror fans that talk down on movies with children being the killers since they could simply dropkick the kids to avoid being harmed. The idea of drop kicking a tiny killer sounds a little funny, but try placing yourself in a movie characterís shoes. How much more difficult is it going to be having to harm a child, even if itís a little hellion, as compared to finding the courage to attack an adult killer? At the very end of the film, Clťmentine showed what would happen in most situations. Planning a way to punish your attackers is the easy part. Actually following through with that plan and hurting a young child is the far more difficult task. The mid 2000s seemed to really relish in showing off deadly children with Hostel, Eden Lake, and Ils. I still find that threat to be effective.

    Overall, I found myself really impressed with Ils the first time I saw it over a decade ago and it still holds up to me. At this stage of my life where Iím not all that enthusiastic to watch something overly intense and sickening, Ils has the right amount of intensity. Ils thrived on keeping the viewer tense throughout the film and the idea of whatís happening is far sicker than what we actually had to see. Clocking in at just under an hour and twenty minutes, itís a quick watch and one that will hopefully stay with you long after the end credits stop. Now, if only someone could make sense of why the English title is ďThemĒ instead of ďTheyĒ. I get that ďTheyĒ is a bit of an unusual title, but Ils is French for they and ďTheyĒ appears prominently in some rather important lines in the subtitles late in the film. Them is a giant ant movie, not a movie about a couple being terrorized all night! In conclusion, I love Ils and Iím surprised that itís never been remade. Although, perhaps thatís a good thing?

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, would you mind getting inside the oven to clean it?

  9. #89

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #14
    Title: The Visit
    Country: United States
    Year: 2015
    Director: M. Night Shyamalan




    Wanting to mend the relationship between their mother and her parents, two teens head off to meet their grandparents for the first time, unaware of whatís awaiting them.


    Over the course of the last two decades, M. Night Shyamalan has been one of the most divisive directors in all of Hollywood. His career started off on such a high note where he was not only touted as the next Steven Spielberg, but due to his fondness for creating a major plot twist late in his films, a plot device is pretty much named after him. His time on top would be short lived as moviegoers began to tire of his formula and after a string of less than acclaimed films, fans began to question if Shyamalan was ever as talented as others believed. Personally, Shyamalanís fall from grace didnít hurt me hard. The Sixth Sense is a film I had to learn to love. Iíve never liked Unforgettable. Itís been ages, but I recall really liking Signs. The Village was enjoyable, but felt misleading. Other films like The Happening and The Lady in the Water werenít good. Seeing The Visit in the theater, I found myself loving it to the point that I once called it my favorite Shyamalan film and included it in my top ten horror list for 2015. After four years, how would my opinion be now?

    Considering how much praise I once sang for The Visit, Iím left disappointed by how little I enjoyed the film this time around. Any of the problems I had an issue with during my first watch remained a problem, but now I had plenty of other problems. Itís not all disappointments though, both the scares and the heart remained. The predictable Shyamalan plot twice worked really well for me once it was revealed that Becca and Tyler were staying with two strangers that were not, in fact, their grandparents. Considering all of the weird things that had already been happening, I wouldnít say the plot twist changed things for the teens, itís still such a terrifying idea when it comes to the motherís horrifying realization that her children are not safe. Itís a scary scenario when it comes to Becca and Tyler feeling unsafe, but theyíre out in the middle of nowhere, unable to get away from these lunatics. Although the scenes at night with Nana were meant to be the scariest scenes of the film, but the filmís trailer gave away too many of these happenings. However, where the Nana does create a scary moment is the under the house hide-n-seek game. At that point, things hadnít gone too crazy yet, so there was an uncertainty for whether or not this scene would be when things escalated. Lastly, thereís a good amount of unnerving moments such as Pop Pop being caught ďCleaningĒ his shotgun.

    Two of the better scenes of the film dealt with the kids having to be vulnerable on camera with their sibling asking difficult questions. In both cases, these moments are built around the ramifications of divorce and how easily a child can have a skewed view of how things happened. Forget about the murderous Nana and Pop Pop, the father came across as the biggest villain in the film. Leaving his family without any contact and his only idea to comfort his daughter was a card? Itís heartbreaking to see how these two kids are left emotionally broken due to the loss of someone they thought loved them. The moral of the story is built around the personal need for forgiveness. Hanging onto the anger isnít going to help you and in the case of Becca, losing that anger doesnít mean you have to forgive someone who did you wrong. Itís about not letting past pain forever change you.

    Unfortunately, thereís plenty of elements in this movie that I had a problem with. In my initial way, the aspect I hated the most was the Depends sub-plot. Itís such a crass gag that is brought up too many times. For someone who was, at one time, so highly respected, youíd think that Shyamalan would be above relying on such cheap toilet humor jokes. Now look, the main legacy of The Visit is that itís the movie where a kid gets a dirty diaper shoved in his face. Why would you ever want your film, your work of art, to be known for that? Thereís also some lapses of logic. Both siblings have their own hang ups that cause them to act unusual in life. For Becca, sheís unable to look at herself in a mirror. For Tyler, heís a germaphobe. Yet, how does Becca apply her makeup each day if she refuses to use mirrors? Youíd think if Tyler struggles to even touch a light switch without using a tissue, heíd never, ever, be willing to climb under a dirty house to play hide and seek. Who knows what kind of stuff could be under that house! In a Shyamalan trademark, Becca seemed too smart for her own good. Perhaps I was just an uneducated neanthadral as a teenager, but Beccaís vocabulary far exceeded my own at the same age. Then thereís the fact that their mother allowed them to go off to their grandparentsí place for a full week without having any contact with her parents. I wouldnít say she deserved for her children to be put in harmís way, but maybe next time you should talk on the phone or video chat your parents just to confirm that they are who they say they are. Had she done that simple check, her children wouldnít have ever been put in danger. I realize that without the kids going to their grandparentsí house, you wouldnít have had a movie, but what about setting up the visit prior to the grandparentsí deaths?

    My greatest annoyance was something I didnít even have a problem with it the first time I saw the movie. Throughout the entire movie, thereís a lot of build up to the reveal of what had happened between the grandparents and their daughter that caused them to stop talking for fifteen years. Becca kept asking her mother and grandparents over and over, what happened, but kept not receiving an answer. Initially, I believed that it didnít matter what was the reasoning for the split because it was now irrelevant. It was just a reminder that you canít allow anger to rule your life where hopefully Becca will let go of her anger towards her own dad so that she didnít end up like her mother. Now though, I find it incredibly frustrating because of all of the teasing. At the very end of the film, we finally found out what happened. There was some yelling, the mother slapped the grandmother, and the grandfather slapped his daughter. Thatís it. Granted, itís not such a happy family moment, but thatís such an underwhelming reveal. There was an episode of Roseanne where the title character lost her cool and slapped her son, DJ. That was played up as a shocking moment and was played up as a significant event. Itís just not as big of a deal for a teenage daughter to be slapped by her father after she slapped her mother. Itís understandable why the grandparents didnít divulge the details of what caused the split since they obviously wouldnít have known, but considering how low scale of a reveal it was, I would have rather the mom have just admitted to it at the beginning of the film.

    Overall, The Visit was meant to be M. Night Shyamalanís return to form to get him back on a respected level. At the time, I thought he succeeded. Nowadays, I find it to be a decent film, but one that is greatly flawed by some of Shyamalanís standard tropes. The heart displayed in the film when it came to the children dealing with the divorce of their parents was emotional. Likewise, there were plenty of creepy moments. I know I donít look at cleaning an oven the same way after seeing The Visit. There were just lapses in basic logic and an awful sub-plot geared toward Depends. What was once a film I rated 8.5/10 and one of the best of 2015 is now simply an average horror from the year. Oh well, at least The Sixth Sense holds up. If youíre a fan of the actors who played Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and Tyler (Ed Oxenbould), I recommend watching their other film together, the 2016 Home Alone inspired Christmas horror, Better Watch Out, instead.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, earlier in the year, this actress terrified with her raspy voice, now she...sings?

  10. #90
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    I'm making my way through the Halloween series this month, I'm watching 4 now and just read your spectacular review, and then I realized you have not reviewed part 3. I'm curious to know what you think about it

  11. #91

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    I'm making my way through the Halloween series this month, I'm watching 4 now and just read your spectacular review, and then I realized you have not reviewed part 3. I'm curious to know what you think about it
    Perhaps you should keep an eye on the thread, especially very soon...but not like REALLY very soon, more like PRETTY very soon...

  12. #92

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #15
    Title: Little Monsters
    Country: Australia/United States/United Kingdom
    Year: 2019
    Director: Abe Forsythe




    After a zombie outbreak occurs near a kindergarten's class field trip, the children's only hope for survival is their ukulele playing teacher, a slacker serving as adult supervision, and a children's entertainment show host.


    With Little Monsters being the now third horror/comedy zombie/enraged movie Iíve covered this October, Iíve either been extremely lucky or zombie films now goes out of their way to try and add a small twist to help their film stand out from all of the others. In One Cut of the Dead, it was a found footage movie that also saw the behind the scenes story for a TV special. In Office Uprising, it was bringing the action into an office building. Little Monsters again does something different and I canít recall seeing it done before. In the movie, a class of five year olds is on a field trip when the zombie outbreak occurs. Not only are many children seemingly at risk of being turned undead, but their teacher, Miss Caroline, and Dave, the uncle of one of her students, are having to try and shelter the children from the reality of the situation.

    The entire reason why I decided to watch the film in the first place was because Miss Caroline was played by Lupita Nyong'o. Not counting her CGI role of Maz Kanata in the most recent Star Wars trilogy, I only know of Nyongío from 2019ís terrifying yet fascinating Us. With her raspy voice and how crazy dangerous she came across in Us, learning that she plays a cheerful kindergarten teacher who entertains her children with songs that she sings and plays on her ukulele made Little Monsters a must watch. For the vast majority of the movie, Miss Caroline came across as the sweetest teacher you can imagine where you start to really respect her when you see how far sheís willing to go to protect her children. In one scene, sheís forced to leave the building where the survivors are bunkered in from the zombies to retrieve one of her studentís backpacks which contained an Epipen. This is the one scene in when Miss Caroline mirrors Nyongíoís characters in Us as she goes on an absolute warpath with a large shovel, decapitating a bunch of zombies and returning to her class covered in blood. Nyongío is quickly becoming one of the bigger bad asses in horror.

    The whole balancing act between comedy and horror tends to be a difficult one when it comes to zombie movies, but Iíd easily say that Little Monsters is more of a comedy than a horror. However, thereís also a lot of heart and sweetness. As itís a zombie movie, there just has to be a slacker main character who learns responsibility and improves himself over the course of a zombie movie and in this case, itís Dave. The love that Dave slowly shows his nephew, Felix, is heartwarming. Just as Miss Caroline softened her opinion of Dave once she saw this side of him, the viewer does too. It was unexpected, but all of the songs sang in the movie, with of all artists, Taylor Swift popping up a lot, added to that heart as the two adults are only caring about the happiness and well being of the children. When the children were happy, that happiness was infectious. If nothing else, Little Monsters is a feel good movie.

    If I wasnít a fan of one element, it was Josh Gadís character of Teddy McGiggle. Teddy is an Australian childrenís entertainment performer whose true nature is exposed once the outbreak occurs and we learn just how selfish he can be. We initially saw this new side of him when he refused to let the children into the souvenir center, where he was hiding out, forcing the other adults to find alternate routes in. For the rest of his time in the movie, Teddy continued to be a scumbag, often getting in the way of keeping the childrenís morale high. I recognize that Teddy was supposed to be seen as a villain, but he felt too over the top to me. Considering the fact that itís such a cheerful movie that perhaps the film would be careful in who they select to be killed off, Teddy was seemingly just added to the movie to allow for a character, of some importance, to be killed off at the end. Remove him from the film, as he didnít truly alter the story, and there would have been far more time to showcase the zombies. Instead, the zombies really take a backseat once all of the survivors end up in the same building, minus a couple of scenes including the aforementioned bloody run committed by Miss Caroline.

    Overall, Little Monsters is just a wacky little comedy horror zombie movie. The zombies looked pretty good, without any of that cheesy CGI that you sometimes see low budget zombie movies relying on these days. Although she wasnít given as much to work with as she was in Us, Lupita Nyong'o, once again did a fantastic job. The next time you watch Us, immediately turn on Little Monsters to catch the same actress playing her ukulele while singing Taylor Swiftís ďShake it OffĒ. Itís quite the trippy contrast. Thereís plenty of heart and feel goodness about the film. Admittedly, I wished there were more scenes with the zombies and far less scenes with Josh Gad. Still, itís a fun movie thatís currently streaming as a Hulu Original.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, how about showcasing a giant fucking bug movie in Fright Fest 11?

  13. #93
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Little Monsters looks super dope. I enjoyed the Visit for what it was but agreed that it's pretty average.


    The only time WWE came close to a good story line post Attitude Era was Undertaker/Mordecai - Dakstang

  14. #94
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Now you got to review the Fred Savage/Howie Mandel Little Monsters, fucking loved that movie when I was a kid.

  15. #95

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #16
    Title: The Deadly Mantis
    Country: United States
    Year: 1957
    Director: Nathan Juran




    After a giant praying mantis awakes and begins feeding on military and civilians alike on his way down to the south, the military is left to try and figure out how to stop it for good.


    When it comes to the glory years of the Universal Monsters/Universal Horror, everyone seems to be in agreement for when it began. Clearly, itís 1931 with the release of Tod Browningís Dracula. Granted, there were some silent movies released by Universal, but typically that just gets lumped in the silent era with the different studios. The ending of the Universal Monsters depends on who you ask. The general public only really thinks about the main monsters, with it ending basically in the 40s before briefly returning with the Creature from the Black Lagoon trilogy. Some even cite it as far as 1960ís The Leech Woman. Then thereís some who just focuses on breaking down the different eras, which I suppose is meant to acknowledge the 50s without spending any time focusing on them. Horror, in general, changed so much following World War 2 that the emphasis was no longer actually on the horror, but rather the ramifications of nuclear bombs and the eventual fear of what else could be in existence outside of this world. As a result, the Universal Horrors of the 50s tend not to receive much love or appreciation, outside of the Creature from the Black Lagoon, and The Deadly Mantis is a good representation of what horror was offering at this point. The good and the bad.

    Being released just a few years after the original Godzilla film, you can certainly see the inspiration that that classic monster had on this American movie. The first half of the film is built around the mystery of whatís going on as the military tries to work out what is happening to their men and what this creature could be. The first proper reveal of the mantis outside of a building in which our three main stars are at came across as a great scene as the characters were unaware of the giant mantis approaching, but the viewers could see it in exterior shots. As tensions rose, we then could see the mantis from the window inside of the room, but since all three characters were discussing the creature, they were too preoccupied to notice it at first. Any of the shots in which a character is by the window, unaware of whatís looking in at them from behind the window is great.

    The downside to the film is that itís simply a movie about a giant praying mantis. When itís just on the ground, thereís some intimidation, but when itís flying, using 1950s effects, it looks really cheesy and sucks all tension out of the room. Thereís that famous belief in horror that you canít show the monster too much or else itís no longer scary. It definitely applies here. This is also why my second favorite scene, when the giant mantis feasts on everyone riding a bus while a woman looks on in horror in all of the fog is so effective. The fog helps hide some of the weaknesses of the design and itís a much more traditional horror shot, echoing back to the classic days of the Universal Monsters such as the foggy moors in The Wolf Man.

    Sadly, The Deadly Mantis just canít keep the excitement going. One drawback is that itís a long movie when compared to the classic Universal Monsters. An hour and twenty minutes may be short by todayís standards, but it drags by what I expect out of the Universal Horrors. Thereís also a clear cheap approach to the film using a lot of stock footage. This low budget is also why the film was so hindered by not being able to showcase the raw destruction that a giant mantis could cause. Ultimately, what sort of damage did the mantis really cause? A few holes in some buildings or transportation vehicles? Quite a far cry from what Godzilla was doing over in Japan at the same time.

    Overall, The Deadly Mantis was exactly what I imagined. A film filled with unmemorable characters, except for how creepy the military acted around seeing a woman for the first time in months, that was played off as comedy. The creature was pretty silly, but in the right conditions could be involved in some nice looking shots. As someone who isnít even a fan of The Creature from the Black Lagoon, itís a rough decade for me to try to enjoy, with things only picking up at the end of the 50s with the arrival of Hammer and Vincent Price starting to reach his peak as one of the new horror greats. Still, The Deadly Mantis is an easy enough movie to sit through if youíre curious about what horror was like during this down decade.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, that damn, fucking jingle will be stuck in my head for days now...

  16. #96

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #17
    Title: Halloween III
    Country: United States
    Year: 1982
    Director: Tommy Lee Wallace




    While investigating a mysterious murder, a pair stumbles onto a horrific secret hiding out inside of the Silver Shamrock masks factory.


    Looking back on the highly successful Halloween franchise, I donít believe that Halloween II receives enough recognition for the role it had in forever cementating the series in its ways. By now, itís pretty common knowledge that after writers John Carpenter and Debra Hill realized their exhaustion with the Michael Myers saga and opted to write a new Halloween film without their Boogeyman, this was supposed to be the launching point of the true gimmick of the Halloween franchise - an anthology series built around various spooky tales set around Halloween. Instead, Halloween IIís release the prior year made it clear that the Halloween franchise was built around Michael Myers and only Michael Myers. So in 1982, with the team coming back together for their third film, this time with Tommy Lee Wallace at the helm, they attempted to tell a non-Myers tale, only for the public to lash out.

    My experience in discussing Halloween III: Season of the Witch with strangers on the internet dates back to nearly two full decades. My introduction to online communities was an old Halloween movies message board. Especially back then, you were flooded with hatred towards Halloween III with it simply becoming accepted fact that Halloween III was an awful mistake and the fact that it didnít have Michael was enough reason to rank it as the worst of the Halloween films. Yet, over the last twenty years in which Iíve been on the internet, opinions have swayed and perhaps years and years of fans immediately dismissing Season of the Witch solely because of its differences has caused new fans to question those past beliefs. After all, if you ignore the fact that Michael Myers isnít in the film, is it as terrible as the film is made out to be? The fact is that it now is no longer what Iíd consider an underrated film, but instead has a fairly common opinion that itís actually good. What caused this opinion to change?

    Just in general, I think that thereís an appreciation that Season of the Witch offers something new and different to the series. Pair this with the fact that since Season of the Witchís original release, thereís been some pretty terrible Halloween fils, and suddenly Season of the Witch seems a lot more appealing. While all of the other films are more straight out slashers with only The Curse of Michael Myers adding some other, questionable, elements, Halloween III is instead presented as a mystery. It begins with a wonderful chase scene with a man grasping a Silver Shamrock pumpkin mask as heís trying to invade two men in suits. Who are these men and why is this older gentleman such a clear target? It doesnít even stop after the older man is taken to a hospital, instead heís brutally attacked, killed, with his assiialint opting to pour gasoline all over himself, committing suicide instead of giving away any secrets. From there, the film focuses on Dr. Challis and the old manís daughter, Ellie, as they try to figure out what that pumpkin maskís role was in all of this. That leads them to Santa Mira, California, the location of the factory that creates the masks, but that only creates more questions due to Silver Shamrockís odd control over the little Irish based town and its even more unusual owner, Conal Cochran. From the very beginning when you hear that beautiful synth music to the final minutes, the film is just a story filled with mysteries, encouraging the viewer to continue watching to learn its answers. None of the other Halloween films can say that.

    If the original Halloween, and by extension its sequels, had that amazing score composed by John Carpenter, Season of the Witch has that incredible catchy jingle. It doesnít matter if youíve seen the movie once or a dozen times, that damn jingle is going to be the main element that youíll remember from the film. There may be times in which the jingle is annoying, but it always comes back around again with it being oddly entertaining. That jingle also sets up the most shocking scene of the film as a family touring the Silver Shamrock factory has the son presented with his very own Silver Shamrock mask and is sat in front of a television when that song comes up again, this time activating a magical of sorts chip in the logo of the mask that causes the boy to be attacked by a slew of snakes and insects that somehow generated from inside of the mask. As horrifying as it is to watch this child being killed in such an absurd way, his parents quickly fall to the same threat after the venomous snakes get too close. So between a highly catchy jingle and the ramifications of what that jingle can cause, you have something truly terrifying. Conal Cochran is such an evil man that heís looking to commit a mass sacrifice by targeting children on Halloween! Halloween III is a film not afraid to go in dark directions.

    Speaking of Cochranís sacrifice, that also plays into another strength of the film, it has very strong ties to not only Halloween, but also its Pagan roots. With the Michael Myers films, being a slasher is at the forefront with the date in which it takes place on tacked on second. Sometimes thereís a bigger Halloween holiday feel than others. Season of the Witch never lets you forget what time of year it is. Sometimes it accomplishes that by its repetitive jingle literally reminding you how many days it is until Halloween. The strong Celtic roots exhibited by Cochran reminds everyone that itís not just about Halloween, but also what came before. To tie this together with both the jingle based deaths and the mysteries, I really love how little information Cochran reveals when it comes to making his plan possible. Basically, all we know is that the Silver Shamrock folks somehow stole a piece of Stonehenge, brought it to America, and is chipping away at it, so that they can use the magic of that large rock to allow for the mask, through the work of some computers, kill. Thereís a certain glee in Cochranís voice when he mentions a little tidbit, but then is quick to state that thereís loads more that heís not revealing.

    This mystery of how it all works has caused me to question something for the first time with this latest watch. Season of the Witch has always been a film with a cliffhanger. Was Challis able to convince that third television channel to drop their playing of the jingle in time or was he too late, with every child around the country that was watching on that channel, now being killed because of their masks? However, Iím wondering if the cliffhanger isnít actually if everyone is safe or not, but rather if those masks are still dangerous? We saw what those masks could do earlier in the film with the family touring the factory, but that was before Challis killed not only Cochran, but also seemed to destroy the hub of that power and burn down the entire factory. How necessary was it for that factory to still remain in control for the jingle to activate the chip in the masks? I recognize that this question makes the cliffhanger at the end of the film far less dramatic to the point that it may even ruin the ending, but thatís the fun of watching a movie so many times. Youíre able to come up with some new theories to look at the movie in an entirely different light.

    And really, isnít looking at a movie in an entirely new light ultimately Season of the Witchís legacy? Itís a film that for so long was disrespected solely because it wasnít what was expected, until moviegoers began looking at it in a different perspective. What you have is a film filled with mystery, intense kills, and memorable characters. Take Challis for example. Heís one of the most likable protagonists in a Halloween film, despite the fact that he does some pretty shitty things. While his ex-wife may come across as a nagger when he starts cancelling plans he had with his children, itís pretty clear that this is a regular thing for him, likely one of the issues that caused their divorce. His first excuse of a murder happening at his hospital, so he was too preoccupied with dealing with that to see his children, was perfectly acceptable. His next excuse that was a blatant lie so he could run off with the younger Ellie as they investigate a mystery, not so acceptable. A terrible father, but hey, Challis managed to bang a younger woman. That sort of flawed character is fun to watch. Tom Atkins is a treat to the world of horror and I credit him for one of the reasons why Season of the Witch has slowly gained respect. He represents the movie well - they give you a reason to hate them (Not having Michael/Being a terrible father), but slowly wins you over by what they do offer. Speaking of Ellie, her reveal at the end of the movie has forever caused me to question if someone is who they say they are after theyíve disappeared for awhile. 2019ís Us big twist worked on me because I expected an Ellie-like switch only in the final act when both mothers went back underground.

    Overall, was Season of the Witch what you wanted out of a Halloween film? For many people, even those who enjoyed the movie, the answer is no. For many years, Iíve stood my ground that the movie shouldnít have been called Halloween III simply because that results in certain expectations. Expectations that was set-up by 1981ís Halloween II being a direct sequel to Halloween. Had Season of the Witch been released the year prior, thus cutting the Michael Myers story off with one film, would the result have been the same? Possibly, but I firmly believe Season of the Witch would have had a better chance of being accepted. Looking beyond that pesky Halloween III title, Season of the Witch offers plenty of 80s delights with its synth music, commercialism on full display, and creative deaths. The film might be a little cheesy and that jingle can drive anyone to insanity, but itís still a film that I greatly enjoy watching.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, can Dr. Loomis figure out whatís happening under the subway?

  17. #97
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    My family has been getting together on the weekends to watch the Halloween movies this month since I scored the blu ray collection, everyone's reactions to part 3 were so interesting to me. It was like a shocker that Michael wasn't in part 3 and then it was lack of interest, like man can we just skip to part 4 this one kinda sucks. But fuck that part 3 is one of my favorites I've always really loved it for some reason. I always use part 3 as ammunition when I'm arguing about how much better Friday the 13th series is than Halloween, "Part 3 doesn't even fucking have Michael Myers in it!" but deep down inside I'm a huge fan of part 3, it's a really fucked off little story and I love it. Like you said it also has this excellent Halloween vibe about it from start to finish. I think it's definitely better than all Halloween movies after part 4. Really nice review, after just kinda not feeling it so far this month now I'm in the Halloween mood brah.

    Speaking of part 4 I watched it a couple nights ago and really enjoyed it. I was never a big fan of 4 or 5 but on this watchthrough I really dug part 4. Only problem was the way Michael looked; really lame. They should have made him bigger more muscular or something I don't know he just looks really weird in this one, not just his mask but his build and everything. Compare it to what Jason looked like in the 1988 Friday movie and what Freddy and Pinhead looked like Michael just looks so dorky and lame in part 4 compared to what else was going on that year in horror movies.
    Last edited by ShinobiMusashi; 10-17-2019 at 06:15 AM.

  18. #98
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    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    I fucking love Season of the Witch, Cochran is such a great baddie


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    The only time WWE came close to a good story line post Attitude Era was Undertaker/Mordecai - Dakstang

  19. #99

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    My family has been getting together on the weekends to watch the Halloween movies this month since I scored the blu ray collection, everyone's reactions to part 3 were so interesting to me. It was like a shocker that Michael wasn't in part 3 and then it was lack of interest, like man can we just skip to part 4 this one kinda sucks. But fuck that part 3 is one of my favorites I've always really loved it for some reason. I always use part 3 as ammunition when I'm arguing about how much better Friday the 13th series is than Halloween, "Part 3 doesn't even fucking have Michael Myers in it!" but deep down inside I'm a huge fan of part 3, it's a really fucked off little story and I love it. Like you said it also has this excellent Halloween vibe about it from start to finish. I think it's definitely better than all Halloween movies after part 4. Really nice review, after just kinda not feeling it so far this month now I'm in the Halloween mood brah.
    I have the same boxset, presuming it's the more basic ten disc set instead of the limited edition fifteen disc set. The one thing that annoys me about it is that Halloween II and Halloween III don't have any subtitles. This, despite the fact that those discs were made by Shout Factory and Shout Factory puts in some serious effort in the extra features of their releases. Yet, so many of their releases lack something as basic as subtitles. It wasn't until Shout released the steelbook versions of Halloween II and III that subtitles were finally added.

    Ever since I started turning subtitles on for everything, I'm amazed by all that's included in the script, but it's done in such a way that it's next to impossible to hear unless you have subtitles. Background dialogue is the best example. For Halloween III, I most wanted the subtitles to be able to hear everything Challis' ex wife was yelling at him about in each of those phone calls.

    Any excuse using Halloween III not having Michael somehow making Friday the 13th the better series is a pretty silly one when Jason wasn't even the killer in two of the films.

    Speaking of part 4 I watched it a couple nights ago and really enjoyed it. I was never a big fan of 4 or 5 but on this watchthrough I really dug part 4. Only problem was the way Michael looked; really lame. They should have made him bigger more muscular or something I don't know he just looks really weird in this one, not just his mask but his build and everything. Compare it to what Jason looked like in the 1988 Friday movie and what Freddy and Pinhead looked like Michael just looks so dorky and lame in part 4 compared to what else was going on that year in horror movies.
    Maybe it's just because it's my favorite movie, but I can defend Halloween 4 for ages. Not a fan of the mask? That's fair, but do remember that Michael got the mask from some cheap local drug store. That's the sort of mask I'd imagine a place like that would have. Not a fan of Michael's build in the movie? Keep in mind he has been in a coma for a full decade. Put Brock Lesnar in a coma for a decade and by time he wakes up, he'd look like a lanky bitch as well. There's zero problem in disliking these choices, but these choices do have a lot of logic to them.

  20. #100

    Re: Fright Fest 11 - Franken Berry Turns Your Poop Pink

    Day #18
    Title: Death Line
    Country: United Kingdom
    Year: 1972
    Director: Gary Sherman




    After a series of mysterious disappearances at a subway stop, the police begin investigating, unaware that the disappearances are tied to a local legend.


    One of the appeals of the online subscription service, Shudder, is simply to browse through their movie selection to see if thereís anything that catches your eye. With a good coverage of foreign, both new and old, thereís surely something that even most horror fans havenít seen. In my case, what caught my eye the most was Shudderís poster for Death Line. With Donald Pleasence and Christopher Leeís names shown prominently at the top of the poster, who wouldnít want to watch the film? Although I love Shudder, this poster is also incredibly misleading. While Pleasence is, indeed, one of the stars, Leeís role is so tiny that one could easily miss the scene that he was in. However, apparently, this movie suffers from being misleading from multiple accounts online. On IMDb, Raw Meat, the name Death Line was given for its release in the US in 1973, features a poster with a clan of nine cannibals wearing very little to conceal their bodies. Considering the fact that Death Line features one main cannibal, who is always fully dressed in clothes, this poster doesnít make a single bit of sense. Could we get a poster that actually reflects the film accurately?

    The story is fairly basic, but itís interestingly enough. After a young couple, Alex and Patricia, finds a man, later identified as James Manfred, passed out on a subway staircase, they go to inform a police officer, only for the body of Manfred not to be there any more once they bring the police officer to the location. As the police begin to investigate due to other past reports of missing people on the same subway and the fact that Manfred was an OBE (This dumb American hadnít a clue what OBE meant until after the film ended, apparently itís some prestigious award given to Brits, good for Manfred), they learn of a previous accident that happened in a section of the railway where a dozen people were buried in a cave in, with everyone thought to have been killed. In reality, they survived, but after being trapped in the now shut down portion of the subway, theyíve lived there for decades breeding all the while. That clan of cannibals are down to its last member, who had been relying on subway travelers to feast on after digging out holes through his portion of the subway to the more active areas. From that point on, the film is all about the police investigation, Alex constantly being dragged in for additional questioning, and the final cannibal killing additional people. Although an interesting premise that certainly reminds me of something like The Hills Have Eyes or even 2004ís Creep, the story is a little thin for its running time of an hour and thirty minutes. While there is an additional attack, most of the film is simply reacting from the mystery of not knowing what happened to Manfred. I feel you could easily cut this film down into an hour long presentation for some anthology television show without losing any of the story.

    The main element that held my interest throughout though was Dr. Loomis himself, Donald Pleasence. Pleasence plays the role of Inspector Calhoun, the head of the police investigating the case of the missing man. Calhoun is such an over the top character that he steals every scene in which heís in. If you thought Pleasence was in a playful mood when he scared Lonny in Halloween, itís nothing compared to the mood that Calhoun was in for the majority of Death Line. The first time we met Calhoun, heís absolutely aghast that heíd be served his cuppa tea with a tea bag! Tea is apparently so important to Calhoun that heís constantly being handed a new cup, including waking up in the middle of the night, only for a teapot to be right next to his bed. Going to check out Manfredís house to try and drum up clues to his disappearance, he canít help but to joke about nicking some of Manfredís valuable possessions. Without spoiling it, thereís even a pub scene that is particularly entertaining. Calhoun has a deep resentment of the MI5 division and the fear of them taking over the case. Not only does this provide some comedy with Christopher Lee being revealed to be MI5 agent, but it alludes to Pleasenceís past ďLifeĒ as Blofeld in the James Bond film, You Only Live Twice. With all of these quirks while also showing that heís a fair and efficient cop, even if his personality makes him come across as if heís not fair, his character is such a delight to watch. Due to what a massive role Halloween and by extension the Dr. Samuel Loomis character, had on my movie fandom, I will always think of that character first and foremost when thinking of Pleasence, but if Iíve learned anything in 2019 from watching the James Bond series for the first time ever or watching Death Line, itís that Pleasenceís greatness was not relegated to just that iconic Loomis role.

    Thinking back over my reviews, I feel as if one of my more repetitive lines is speaking out about how surprised I was about the amount of heart was shown in a movie. However overly used as my expression of shock may be, itís nonetheless true for Death Line. In the film, the cannibal, credited simply as ĎThe Maní in the end credits, showed a lot of emotion throughout the film. Technically, at the start of the film, there were two cannibals left with a female cannibal still alive, but merely clinging onto life. It would be her death that would cause the man to snap, attacking ďNormiesĒ more often and without just attacking for the sake of securing future food. The scene in which the woman dies is heartbreaking due to how emotionally distraught the man becomes. In that moment, this man that has lived his entire life in this long forgotten area of the subway, was down to one last remaining family member, and now sheís gone. He is entirely alone in life and even if he were to venture out of the subway, what is he going to do? Heís more animal than human. Even when the man is doing heinous acts, the viewer canít help but to feel some sympathy for him. While movies like The Hills Have Eyes tried to showcase emotion a little with the killers, Death Line absolutely nailed it.

    Looking around the internet, it seems as if the biggest negative point of the film seems to be the acting of David Ladd, who played the role of Alex. I didnít mind his acting though. Obviously, he was nowhere near as entertaining as Pleasence or as emotional as Hugh Armstrong, who played ĎThe Maní. The reality of the situation is that despite being one of the main characters, Alex (And Patricia) have so little to do with the plot up until the final act. Yet, Alex kept receiving scene after scene and ultimately, what sort of material was he given? For the first hour of the film, Alexís sole purpose in the film is to downplay the significance of initially finding Manfred due to assuming he was simply a drunk. Compare his role to that of The Man. The faults of Ladd is less of an acting problem, but more of a scripting problem.

    Overall, I enjoyed my first viewing of Death Line. The premise is something that although Iím already familiar with, I find it to be an interesting one. Donald Pleasence continues to be such a delight as I further my knowledge of his roles outside of the Halloween series. While the script was pretty thin, which resulted in the plot feeling stretched to ninety minutes, it did contain some genuine heart to the movie through The Man. Since I did watch it on Shudder, I do have to knock the film a little bit due to how misleading the poster was with the inclusion of such a bit character like the one Christopher Lee portrayed being highlighted as one of the main stars. Lee was an amazing actor, but anyone who is choosing to watch Death Line because Shudderís poster lists him as being one of the stars will be left disappointed. Still, donít let that disappointment sway you out of watching this better than expected non-Hammer British flick.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, there's some weird ass shit going down in Sweden. That's pretty much all I know about this movie.

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