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Thread: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

  1. #141
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    I thought the remake was completely pointless and just felt like a angered nerd trying to be more dark and mix it with some Stranger Things bullshit.
    -------
    Quote Originally Posted by RaiZ-R View Post
    What the fuck is happening to you guys? I once got a blowjob where she used her teeth a little bit too much and I ended up with a bloody dick, I still enjoyed the blowjob up to the point I started bleeding. I can honestly say that I have never had anything I would call a bad blowjob, that wasn't a great experience but up until I started gushing blood I was having a great time!
    Spoiler:


  2. #142

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Nicky View Post
    I thought the remake was completely pointless and just felt like a angered nerd trying to be more dark and mix it with some Stranger Things bullshit.
    Wow. You're literally only the second person I've heard hate on IT Chapter 1. Everyone else has been so high on the movie to varying degrees. I wouldn't go as far as to say that it's King's best movie, but it instantly became one of his best and destroyed the average original mini-series.

  3. #143
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    This also just isn’t my type of film genre or story. I went with the wife who’s a King fanatic (and gives me massive shit).
    -------
    Quote Originally Posted by RaiZ-R View Post
    What the fuck is happening to you guys? I once got a blowjob where she used her teeth a little bit too much and I ended up with a bloody dick, I still enjoyed the blowjob up to the point I started bleeding. I can honestly say that I have never had anything I would call a bad blowjob, that wasn't a great experience but up until I started gushing blood I was having a great time!
    Spoiler:


  4. #144
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    IT: Chapter One Jim your thoughts are right on the money on how I felt with the film. I loved the Mini-Series growing up and I had to usually watch it alone, because like Child's Play it wasn't a hit with my Brothers and Cousins in the family. Pennywise to me in the remake was someone that you never want to invade your dreams, because he knows what you tick and what makes you become broken in a sense before he goes feasting. Yeah Pennywise in the original had his sinister moments, but not on the level of the remake and the tone was set straight up with the death of Georgie. I second that Mike and Stan was badly used in the remake and were used in the right matter in the Mini-Series and I wonder what will they be doing in Chapter Two going forward.

    Jim are the Deleted Scenes that good to buy and check out? You know me I love Documentaries on the films and how they were done and all. I do remember hearing a Scene getting cut out from Movie that was in the Script where it's a Flashback to I believe Western Times and Pennywise made a deal with a Woman that he'll let her family stay alive, just as long as Pennywise gets her baby and she says yes!


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  5. #145

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Nicky View Post
    This also just isn’t my type of film genre or story. I went with the wife who’s a King fanatic (and gives me massive shit).
    Ugh. Can we just get Mrs. Nicky an account here on WC so we can drop you forever? Whenever you bring her up, she seems way cooler than you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kairi HoHo View Post
    Jim are the Deleted Scenes that good to buy and check out? You know me I love Documentaries on the films and how they were done and all. I do remember hearing a Scene getting cut out from Movie that was in the Script where it's a Flashback to I believe Western Times and Pennywise made a deal with a Woman that he'll let her family stay alive, just as long as Pennywise gets her baby and she says yes!
    I'm pretty sure you can find all of the deleted scenes on Youtube.

  6. #146

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Tales from the Crypt
    Title: The Third Pig
    Season: 7/Episode: 13
    Director: Bill Kopp and Pat Ventura


    In a cartoon world, Dudly, the pig, couldn’t be any more different from his two brothers, Smokey and Drinky. Unlike his unreliable brothers, Dudly is smart enough to have his house made out of bricks to ensure that the hungry Big Bad Wolf can never get to him. Alas, after the Big Bad Wolf eats Smokey and Drinky, the wolf judicial system declares Dudly responsible for the killings, prompting him to be visited by the ghostly spirits of his departed brothers. While never there for Dudly in life, the brothers finally offer Dudly some guidance, leading Dudly to be able to avenge his family’s savage slayings by creating...a monster.

    The Third Pig was unlike any other episode of Tales from the Crypt. For starters, it’s the final ever episode. Airing a mere month before the theatrical release of the second Tales from the Crypt movie, Bordello of Blood (Previously reviewed in Fright Fest 9), The Third Pig also stands out by being not only being the only episode not originally from an EC comic book story, but also it’s the only animated entry. Granted, animation wasn’t completely an unknown area for Tales from the Crypt. The spinoff series, Takes from the Cryptkeeper, was an animated show aimed for a younger demographic. However, unlike the Cryptkeeper series, The Third Pig proudly presents an adult take on an animated tale. For 1996, I feel as if this adult nature on animation is somewhat unique. Sure, you had Beavis and Butt-Head, The Simpsons, and The Ren & Stimpy Show, but the gore factor wasn’t there and in the case of The Simpsons and Ren & Stimpy, the very blunt sexuality wasn’t either.

    The episode really gets good following the deaths of the lazy and crude brothers of Dudly. Up to this point, even though the vulgarity and gore when The Big Bad Wolf killed the pigs was unlike other adaptations of The Three Little Pigs, it gets far more creative after that. The writing in general is really clever, filled with twists and turns sing song with rhymes. First there’s the brilliant idea of Dudly being convicted of his brother’s murders because the cops, jury, and judge are all wolves. Of course Dudly is going to be screwed when he’s not being judged by a jury of his own peers. It has to be a play on real life injustices that a minority goes through, which likely makes this episode far more relevant in 2018 than even when it originally aired. Then the episode goes down the route of a variation on Frankenstein as Dudly creates a Zombiepig. A ZOMBIEPIG! Even when things seem to go well for Dudly with the Zombiepig eating The Big Bad Wolf, he realizes that you have little control over a monster, causing the Zombiepig to come after Dudly. Even then, the twists aren’t done, but I’ll save the last for anyone interested in checking out the episode to see for themselves.

    Although it’s just animated blood, the gore in this episode is pretty gnarly. The death of Drinky had so much blood and it kept going on and on. It’s somehow one of the best gore scenes in the 90s and it’s not even live action! The rhyming is also great. Each rhyme is based around some violence, sexuality, or straight up cussing. My favorite part about the rhymes is that while everyone in the episode is able to perfectly nail the style, the poor Big Bad Wolf keeps struggling to find rhymes for the words that he’s using. It’s an episode long gag until The Big Bad Wolf is finally able to successfully tell a rhyme.

    Overall, The Third Pig may be the final episode of a poorly regarded season 7, but it’s a hell of an episode to wrap up the acclaimed series. Although not a Grimms' Fairy Tale, The Three Little Pigs is one of the oldest “Children’s tale” of bloody murder that has been tamed over the years with the various adaptations. It makes sense that in a series celebrating tales of the macabre, that they’d devote at least one episode to the forefathers that came before them. The Third Pig is one of the most creative episodes of Tales from the Crypt and although not live action, I think it’s well worth a watch for any horror fan.

    Grade: A

    Fright in Motion:

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    Coming up next, grow out your fingernails because it's time to head down to South America to visit a country's first ever horror movie!

  7. #147
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Whew, I see I've got a lot to catch up on after being absent from here for a couple of days.

    There's not much else to say that you didn't cover in regards to Trollhunter. I will point out that the introduction of the Hans character was hilarious and I was immediately interested in finding out more about him. I also enjoyed the sub-plot about how they covered up the existence of the trolls as it made a fantasy concept seems somewhat more realistic than it could have ended up.

    Haven't seen Dracula Has Risen from the Grave for ages so I'll need to try and catch it again before posting any thoughts. You also pretty much hit on every point about Puppet Master 5 that I was going to mention so I'll just say that I'd really be interested in seeing a cut of both it and 4 together with a bunch of the filler removed. I doubt that'll ever happen but it would be interesting nonetheless.

    As far as IT: Chapter One goes, I certainly don't hate on it but I don't think it's any better than the original mini-series. Perhaps that's due to me having seen that one way more but I've always had a soft spot for it despite its shortcomings. I felt the acting in the remake was a little stronger where most of the kids were concerned (or at least not as emotive as in the original) but I wasn't a big fan of updating the time period to the late 80's. As I believe I've mentioned before, the loss of innocence is a big part of King's original story and setting the first part in the 1950's, a much more innocent time than the 1980's, just made more sense to me. It's nothing off-putting mind you, just something I would have preferred to have seen stay the same. It does lend credence to Nicky's comment that it had a bit more of a Stranger Things vibe to it than it would have if it had remained set 30 years earlier.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim
    When it comes over the debate of who was the better Pennywise - Tim Curry vs Bill Skarsgård, I wouldn’t even say it’s worth debating. One isn’t better than the other. They’re two completely different versions of Pennywise.
    I hadn't really seen a lot of people comparing the two but I agree that thre's just no point in trying to argue one over the other. I will say that I felt Skarsgard made the character seem more alien (for lack of a better word) and that does seem a little more like the way King intended it to be. Curry's is still impressive to this day though and one that I couldn't really see anyone else replicating at the time. He was perfectly cast, much like Skarsgard appears to have been here.

    Quote Originally Posted by HoHo
    I second that Mike and Stan was badly used in the remake and were used in the right matter in the Mini-Series and I wonder what will they be doing in Chapter Two going forward.
    I'm pretty sure we know what Stan will be doing, at least when they get to him as an adult.

    I'll have to re-watch the Tales from the Crypt episode but luckily I've got the whole series kicking around so I'll get to it shortly.


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  8. #148

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    Whew, I see I've got a lot to catch up on after being absent from here for a couple of days.
    A new review every day!*

    *Unless Jim becomes a slack bastard and gets behind.

    You also pretty much hit on every point about Puppet Master 5 that I was going to mention so I'll just say that I'd really be interested in seeing a cut of both it and 4 together with a bunch of the filler removed. I doubt that'll ever happen but it would be interesting nonetheless.
    Considering how cheap Full Moon is and that they have their own streaming service, I can't imagine it'd take much time or energy to assign a couple of guys to combine the two films and then present it as some big attraction for the streaming site.

    As far as IT: Chapter One goes, I certainly don't hate on it but I don't think it's any better than the original mini-series. Perhaps that's due to me having seen that one way more but I've always had a soft spot for it despite its shortcomings. I felt the acting in the remake was a little stronger where most of the kids were concerned (or at least not as emotive as in the original) but I wasn't a big fan of updating the time period to the late 80's. As I believe I've mentioned before, the loss of innocence is a big part of King's original story and setting the first part in the 1950's, a much more innocent time than the 1980's, just made more sense to me. It's nothing off-putting mind you, just something I would have preferred to have seen stay the same. It does lend credence to Nicky's comment that it had a bit more of a Stranger Things vibe to it than it would have if it had remained set 30 years earlier.
    There was certainly a Stranger Things vibe about it, made even more apparent by the fact that the same kid is in both, but considering how much movies and TV shows have been loving going back to the 80s and 90s, I wouldn't say IT just tried to piggyback off of the success of IT. Whenever you have something awful happen to kids in movies or TV, there's always going to be some loss of innocence, whether it's set in the more innocent times of the 50s or bringing it to the 80s.

    I hadn't really seen a lot of people comparing the two but I agree that thre's just no point in trying to argue one over the other. I will say that I felt Skarsgard made the character seem more alien (for lack of a better word) and that does seem a little more like the way King intended it to be. Curry's is still impressive to this day though and one that I couldn't really see anyone else replicating at the time. He was perfectly cast, much like Skarsgard appears to have been here.
    I think with the overall popularity of the remake a lot of people lowered their pitchforks and just accepted Skarsgard rather than just fight it out like I imagine they were all set to do. They're both great in their own ways though.

    I'm pretty sure we know what Stan will be doing, at least when they get to him as an adult.
    I have been curious if they're going to be tweaking IT: Chapter 2 any just to make it more their own and to keep it from being too predictable.

    I'll have to re-watch the Tales from the Crypt episode but luckily I've got the whole series kicking around so I'll get to it shortly.
    Speaking of Tales from the Crypt, since I'm amassing quite the collection of episode reviews over the course of Fright Fest, I've removed the links to them in the original full archive post and instead gave them their own spoiler tag between the Fright Fest archive and the non-Fright Fest archive. You can now easily see which episodes I've covered rather than vague mentions of "#5" and then not even be sure if the link refers to one or two episodes.

  9. #149

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Day #14
    Title: At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul
    Country: Brazil
    Year: 1964
    Director: José Mojica Marins




    In a small Brazilian village, a reprehensible gravedigger, Coffin Joe, spends his days terrorizing his neighbors with mocking their faith and attacking all those who dare to stand up to him. Reeling from the fact that his wife will never be able to bear him a child, Coffin Joe looks to continue his legacy. All that is standing in Coffin Joe’s way is finding the perfect unfortunate candidate in his village.


    At Midnight I’ll Take Your Soul is hailed as Brazil’s first ever horror film. Admittedly, I don’t believe I’ve ever watched a Brazilian horror film before, so this importance is a bit lost on me. However, while watching At Midnight, you do get the sense that this is not a horror film made by people with much experience. It’s clearly a very low budget picture that needed to utilize long takes, cheap effects, and the film has a very old look to it. While 1964 is still somewhat early on in the movie industry, this film could easily pass off as if it was created in the 1930s. If you needed any more evidence that this was a movie made for pennies, look at the fact that its director, José Mojica Marins, was also the writer and the star of the film - Coffin Joe. Yet, in spite of the very cheap nature of the film, there’s a certain rawness that helps it stand out.

    Despite being the first ever horror film in Brazil, and by default the most grizzly, Marins intentionally pushes everything to the limits to the point where At Midnight I’ll Take Your Soul comes across as being a graphic and violent film, regardless of what country it comes from. By 1964 standards, it’s a crazy movie with Coffin Joe cutting off fingers, using his insanely long fingernails to poke out a character’s eyes, violently whips another, attacking a woman, and there’s even a rape scene. One of the biggest horror films that I’ve never gotten around to watching is the 1963 HG Lewis splatter classic, Blood Feast, but based on what I’ve heard about that film, I suspect both of these films stand out as being early adapters to being graphic horrors. Is it tame by 2018 eyes? Absolutely, but it’s also over fifty years old. You certainly weren’t getting this sort of violence in American theaters at the time.

    Besides the violence, Marins isn’t shy to go after religion. From my basic understanding of Brazil, they’re a very religious country that’s predominantly Roman Catholic. And again, this was 1964, so it’s utterly shocking to me that Marins managed to get away with having his Coffin Joe character laugh in the face of religion as much as he did. In one of the earliest scenes involving Coffin Joe, he openly shows disdain for the others in the little village for their insistence on following the rules of their religion, flat out thinking he’s better than everyone partially because he’s free of such restrictions. This isn’t even an one time thing either. Throughout the entire film, Coffin Joe is sticking his nose up to God and religion, doing everything in his power to go against the law of God, even going as far as forcing one of the God fearing residents to eat lamb on the day that you’re to abstain from eating all meats. Coffin Joe is a scumbag and he relishes being so.

    Joe’s blasphemy ways isn’t the only example of him being a scumbag either. His tendency to inflict violence on others and to kill without any sort of regret is terrible. The best example of Coffin Joe being a terrible person is exemplified by his first kill. There’s a bunch of different layers when it came to killing his wife, with each layer further revealing how awful he is. On the most basic level behind killing his wife is actually somewhat reasonable. Keyword: somewhat. The one thing Coffin Joe cares about more than anything else is continuing his legacy by having a child. That’s his main desire. So when he learns that his wife is incapable of bearing a child, he wishes to find another woman that is able to have children. How many relationships in life have ended because one person in the relationship wanted kids and the other didn’t? Okay, granted this typically happens before marriage, but you can still understand why Joe wants to find someone else. Yet, rather than just leave his wife, Coffin Joe’s idea is that she must be killed instead. That’s a pretty scummy idea, but again, I wouldn’t call it exactly evil either. Coffin Joe has a problem and killing his wife is the only solution that he has. There’s far better solutions, but that’s the only idea that he has. So fine. But...it gets worse. Instead of just killing his wife off in the most painless and quick manner possible, he ties her to a bed and allows a deadly tarantula to climb over her until the arachnid would bite her, killing her in the process. This is pretty evil, but it gets even worse when you look at how Coffin Joe reacts to his wife dying. Rather than show any sort of regret or compassion, he’s flat out laughing maniacally at his wife’s terror in her final moments. He’s a sick individual and you can’t help but to feel for his wife as she’s completely devoted to him. When you discuss the most evil killers in horror history, Coffin Joe’s actions in this first film are enough to make him one of the most despicable killers in horror.

    And yet, Coffin Joe isn’t without any morals. It’s just that he has a very warped view on life and if something isn’t tied to something he cares about, he shows zero respect towards it. I mentioned it earlier, but Coffin Joe cares deeply about continuing his legacy by having a child. Granted, after raping a woman and seemingly impregnating her, it still doesn’t cause him to show her respect. She’s merely a necessary tool to give him what he wants. The oddity is that Coffin Joe does seem to respect legacies in general. While walking around his village, he witnesses a father manhandling his son, causing Joe to come to the child’s defense. This is the same guy who doesn’t even think twice before violently attacking anyone who crosses him yet he can’t stand by when seeing a man disrespecting his legacy. Perhaps it’s just a jealousy thing with Joe only caring about another man’s relationship with his child until Joe can get a child himself, but I love the fact that this evil man has a soft spot. It’s an example that not everyone is all good or all evil. If Adolf Hitler could love his German Shepherd, why can’t Coffin Joe have love and respect for a person’s children?

    Overall, At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul was an unique experience. It’s a bit reminiscent of Night of the Living Dead where you can tell that José Mojica Marins and George Romero have a good idea of what’s effective in horror, but they’re hindered by having such a low budget, forcing them to figure out ways to bring their vision to life under such limitations. Coffin Joe came across as a memorable vile character that has me curious to see how Marins handles the character in the sequels. The combination of the nastiness of the film and the historic value of being the first ever Brazilian horror film makes At Midnight I’ll Take Your Soul worth watching at least once.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, sticking to South America for a tale partially inspired by a Hitchcock classic.

  10. #150
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Awesome that you are doing Hellraiser this year I'm looking forward to that, I may try to watch it again since I haven't seen it in a few years.

    I've always been curious about that Tales From The Crypt episode. I've never really seen any of the season 7 episodes and was actually surprised to learn a few years ago that the show ran all the way into 1996, I had no idea. I need to pick up the last 3 seasons on DVD sometime I have 1 through 4, I'm probably going to buy that complete box set I seen at Wal Mart for somebody for Christmas, that will make a great gift. Love that you are doing Tales again this year. If you are looking for any recommendations for Tales From The Crypt episodes I remember a good one from season 6 I believe with Bill Paxton and Brad Douriff, it's been a long time since I seen it I can't remember the name.

    Also I found the original 1960's Tales From The Crypt that you covered last year on Amazon Prime yesterday. I didn't get to watch it all but I caught the first 3 stories and man that is very cool. I actually don't remember ever seeing that back in the day, I do remember Vault Of Horror very well though, need to find that.

    Still haven't seen the new It. I wasn't a fan of the original. I remember everybody I knew would hype it up like it was the greatest thing ever then when I finally seen it on VHS years later I thought it was lame as fuck.
    Last edited by ShinobiMusashi; 10-14-2018 at 11:31 AM.

  11. #151

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    I've always been curious about that Tales From The Crypt episode. I've never really seen any of the season 7 episodes and was actually surprised to learn a few years ago that the show ran all the way into 1996, I had no idea. I need to pick up the last 3 seasons on DVD sometime I have 1 through 4, I'm probably going to buy that complete box set I seen at Wal Mart for somebody for Christmas, that will make a great gift. Love that you are doing Tales again this year. If you are looking for any recommendations for Tales From The Crypt episodes I remember a good one from season 6 I believe with Bill Paxton and Brad Douriff, it's been a long time since I seen it I can't remember the name.
    Yeah, I feel like most of the memorable episodes come from the early years of the series while the last couple seasons are especially forgotten.

    Looks like the Paxton/Dourif ep is from season 5 and it's called People Who Live in Brass Hearses. Coincidentally, it originally aired twenty-five years ago exactly...yesterday. The director of the episode, Russell Mulcahy, also directed one of my favorite episodes in Split Second, which I reviewed last year.

    Also I found the original 1960's Tales From The Crypt that you covered last year on Amazon Prime yesterday. I didn't get to watch it all but I caught the first 3 stories and man that is very cool. I actually don't remember ever seeing that back in the day, I do remember Vault Of Horror very well though, need to find that.
    Definately be sure to finish 1972's Tales from the Crypt. The final story, Blind Alleys, is the best of the bunch.

    Still haven't seen the new It. I wasn't a fan of the original. I remember everybody I knew would hype it up like it was the greatest thing ever then when I finally seen it on VHS years later I thought it was lame as fuck.
    If you thought that the original IT was lame, you might be the sort that the remake is tailored for. The cheese factor isn't there in the remake.

  12. #152

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Day #15
    Title: La Casa Muda
    Country: Uruguay
    Year: 2010
    Director: Gustavo Hernández




    A father and daughter goes to fix up an old house when trouble arises...


    La Casa Muda or better known under its English title, The Silent House, is without question the most recognizable Uruguayan horror film ever made. In fact, it’s one of maybe...three(?) made. To give some idea of how much attention this little film began to garnered, the US immediately swooped to start production of the English language remake. La Casa Muda was first screened for the Cannes Film Festival in May 2010 and the US remake, known just as “Silent House”, was first screened for the Sundance Film Festival in January 2011. That’s an insane turnaround and I honestly don’t know if there’s ever been a faster original to remake ever in horror. To best enjoy La Casa Muda, I believe you need to go into the film with as few spoilers as possible, prompting me to try to avoid discussing spoilers as well as I can.

    The basic premise of La Casa Muda is a simple one. In a secluded area in Uruguay, an old dilapidated two story house is in need of repairs before it can be sold. That’s where Winston and his grown daughter, Laura, come into the picture as they’re hired by the owner of the home, Néstor, do do the repairing. Arriving just before nightfall, Winston and Laura plan to initially get some sleep before beginning on the long process in the morning. With Winston and Laura having settled in after going over plans with Néstor one last time prior to Néstor then leaving for the night, Laura begins to hear noises from the second floor, making her believe that her and her dad may not be alone. That’s as much as I really want to discuss with clear statements when it comes to the actual story of the film.

    Particularly the first time that you watch La Casa Muda, it’s a film where it’s so simple to be on the edge of your seat for the entirety of the film. You’re constantly anxious that something bad can happen at any point. Up until the very end, you’re not even sure what you’re supposed to be afraid of. Is there another person in the house? Is it supernatural based? Or is it something entirely different? Ultimately, does it even matter what the actual antagonist is? Laura’s life is still at risk from whatever else that is inside of the house. Part of the appeal to continue to watch the film is to learn what’s happening and find out if Laura can survive it all.

    The creepiness comes from the fact that there’s almost never any sunlight, instead the only light comes from the lamps that the characters roam the house carrying. Various songs will play on the old radio that sounds far more unsettling than I believe they’re originally meant to be. The track that stood out the most to me is the first song played, “Please” by Lucía González. It’s such a pleasant little tune, but hearing it on a crappy speaker in a creepy, dark house suddenly turns it into an unnerving song. In addition to some weird songs, there’s plenty of other sounds made throughout to further scare Laura and the audience. As the film is built around playing with the viewer’s expectations, you’re always unsure if a sudden sound is going to lead to Laura being in actual trouble or if the noise won’t result in anything else immediately happening. If you’re watching La Casa Muda for the first time, I’d suggest turning the lights off and blasting the volume.

    With a budget of only $6,000 (For comparison, Paranormal Activity was made for $15,000), the film is admittedly greatly limited by what they were able to do. Without any money to do anything really fancy, the most creative filmmaking tactic is how it’s made to resemble being shot in one very long continuous take. In fact, when the movie first came out, I believe many actually credited it as being an one shot movie. However, similar to the one continuous take film by Alfred Hitchcock, 1948’s Rope, there isn’t any reason to actually believe that it’s one long take. There’s plenty of moments where the viewer could point at as being a possible moment for a cut, the most obvious being when the screen goes dark for several long moments. Still, despite the false advertisement, this take of using multiple long takes to resemble one feature length take is an interesting one. I feel it adds to the confusion in what’s happening, preventing the viewer from orienting themselves. If Laura is forced to remain in this house, so is the viewer.

    The downside is that I did not enjoy La Casa Muda nearly as much as I originally did. If I recall, the first time I saw it, I believe I had to watch it again just a couple of days later because I found it so captivating. With several years having passed, I’m well aware of what happens in the movie including the ending so I found myself often bored by what I was watching. Watching the film more than once exposes the fact that there’s just not a lot happening in the film. The actual idea of the film is brilliant, but whether it’s because the filmmaker was inexperienced or the lack of money, they weren’t able to do a whole lot with the idea. There’s also the fact that I wasn’t satisfied with the ending. Without giving it away, it’s the sort of conclusion where you immediately then read over the Wikipedia page to see their explanation of what happened to ensure that you’re understanding everything. The first time you watch La Casa Muda, most of the weaknesses are initially hidden.

    Overall, chances are that if you haven’t watched La Casa Muda yet, then you’ve never seen an Uruguayan horror film in general, which automatically makes La Casa Muda an interesting watch. The film was loaded with creepiness thanks to the darkness and the lack of clarity on what was happening. Admittedly, I did feel disappointed though as the movie seemed to have enough big moments for a short film, but stretched out to reach feature film length. Still, I think it’s unique enough to watch it once for the uniqueness.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRD.

  13. #153

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Day #16
    Title: The Devil’s Rejects
    Country: United States/Germany
    Year: 2005
    Director: Rob Zombie




    After their homestead is raided by the police and most of their family is killed, Otis, Baby, and Capt. Spaulding band together as they try to evade the local sheriff, hellbent on revenge following the Firefly's killing of his brother.


    Prior to Rob Zombie ruining his horror reputation in many fan’s eyes with Halloween 2, Lords of Salem, and 31, Zombie started off with so much potential and frankly excitement. Although not perfect with a slow final act and a bit too similar to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, House of 1,000 Corpses was a great first effort. It was very stylized, played into Zombie’s various loves of horror, and introduced the movie world to a trio of colorful new horror villains in the Firefly family. If there was one word to describe Corpses, it was fun. Stripping away the cartoonish feel of Corpses and throwing Captain Spaulding, Otis, and Baby into a more realistic and gritty world, Zombie’s sophomoric effort would remain his masterpiece.

    If there’s one key problem in Zombie’s films, it’s that he sometimes dives too far into the twisted and obscene “Zombieworld”. With each film, it felt as if Zombie was injecting more and more vulgarity in all of his films for the mere sake of adding it. I’m not a prude, but I can only take so much crass humor before it quickly becomes tiresome. He added so much of this Zombie-ism humor and antics to Halloween 2 that he literally managed to kill my Halloween love for a period of time. In The Devil’s Rejects, there’s certainly plenty of vulgarity, but there is some clear restraint. Most of the lowbrow comedy comes in the early going while in the third act, it’s pretty much all gone. When I watched 31, the vulgarity was never ending and within a few minutes, I immediately hated all of the main characters. It was a chore to sit through their scenes together. In The Devil’s Rejects, because there’s less of it, you’re able to care about everyone in the film. The big thing that this film has that most of Zombie films doesn’t is the shocking amount of heart.

    There’s a clear shift in tone in the second half once the film moves away from the motel scene. Suddenly, there’s this weird dynamic of starting to become fond of the Firefly family. It’s all because despite being awful, just awful scumbags that have done terrible things in the previous movie and the first half of this, they still love each other. Once Spaulding, Otis, and Baby left the motel, they started to have almost wholesome fun starting with Spaulding and Baby annoying Otis to stop to get some “Tutti fuckin' frutti” ice cream. As put off as Otis acts, he still stops to get them some and you can tell that he’s enjoying spending time with his favorite people in the world. When they meet up with Spaulding’s old buddy, Charlie (One of the billion roles played by a well known horror star, in this case Ken Foree), they again are solely there to have fun. Granted, it’s not exactly PG fun with Spaulding snorting coke with Charlie and Otis having sex with one of Charlie’s hookers, but everyone is still having a blast. The scene that truly cemented my love for these homicidal maniacs is when Sheriff Wydell has finally caught the Fireflys and with them tied up, he’s enjoying torturing them by nailing photographs of some of their victims to their bodies. Yet, even in this moment of extreme pain, the family are still showing love for each other with Otis’ insistence on being the one that keeps getting the photos nailed to him to spare Baby any more pain. Throughout these two films, Otis has done so many sick and evil acts, but this was such a genuinely heartfelt thing that he was trying to do for his family member.

    The raw emotion and heart of the film is also greatly dependant on Sheriff Wydell. At the same time that the film shifts and the Fireflys become sympathetic, he makes a change too as he somehow becomes a more despicable character than Otis and company. It’s pretty impressive too when you consider the fact that part of the reason why Wydell is so obsessed at catching the Fireflys is to exact revenge on them killing his brother in the previous film. On the surface, he isn’t any different from the Fireflys. He does some terrible things, but family meant the world to him. The question is why is it so easy to hate him more than the Fireflys though? I believe being a police officer is part of it. He’s supposed to be held to higher expectations, so when he’s stooping to the Fireflys levels, it feels more wrong. There’s also the fact that he’s a police officer, but he certainly isn’t acting like it. It becomes clear that his conquest to avenge his brother has nothing to do with the law following the unnecessary kill of Mother Firefly, while in police custody, the torturing of the Fireflys, and the usage of his two dangerous goons (Played by Danny Trejo and former pro wrestler Diamond Dallas Page). You get the impression that Wydell has used these two hunters before to do his dirty deeds while technically keeping his hands clean. Again, being a police officer, it makes him more unlikable at the idea that he’s been dishonest about being law abiding long before his brother was even killed. It’s my belief that Wydell was always a lowlife like the Fireflys, but the big difference is that the Fireflys are honest in what they are. In the case of the Fireflys, the film ending song, “Freebird” seems pretty appropriate to describe them with the line, “And this bird you can not change. Lord knows, I can't change”. There’s something respectable about being who you are and fully admitting who you are rather than living a lie.

    Violence wise, there’s plenty of gritty moments that helps The Devil’s Rejects feel like a breath of fresh air right about the time that horror was beginning to head into the direction of torture porn following a couple decades of MPAA controlled censorship. Otis in particular stands out whenever he’s either killing someone or enjoying some twisted jokes such as wearing the face of a recently killed character to mentally torture the victim’s girlfriend, in a scene reminding me of the infamous “Fishboy” in Corpses. I know at the time, I was really wanting horror to return to the gritty style of the 70s and I still remember leaving the cinema pleased to get exactly what I wanted with The Devil’s Rejects. It’s a small thing, but I love the moment at the end with Wydell seemingly close to choking Baby to death only for Tiny, who hadn’t been seen since before the police ambush at the start of the film, to be the sudden savior attacking Wydell from behind, killing him. Knowing that the actor who played Tiny, Matthew McGrory, sadly passed away weeks after the release of Rejects. Watching the film now, it’s as if Tiny is an angel, returning to save his family for one last time. The fact that he has a Dr. Loomis Halloween 6-like exit with him staying behind while the rest of the gang leaves in a car further makes Tiny’s brief role feel special.

    Overall, I can’t say that I have a single problem with The Devil’s Rejects. It’s incredible violent and twisted with a slew of memorable characters including just cameos such as PJ Soles as the mother whose car Spaulding steals. The crassness of the dialogue and actions is typical of a Zombie film, but I feel as if it’s kept to a reasonable level. The soundtrack throughout is amazing, one that I bought on CD shortly after originally seeing the film in the first place. Rob Zombie, a filmmaker who I can’t say I have the highest opinion of anymore, but he honestly does an incredible job at drastically flipping the script and changing about how you feel about the characters starting at one moment and yet it felt completely natural and realistic. THIS is the sort of Rob Zombie film that I wish we could get with each of his films. Every time I go into a new Rob Zombie film and leave disappointed due to it being just another example of Zombie being obscene simply because he can. He has proved that he’s able to create an incredible film, but ever since the release of The Devil’s Rejects, Zombie continues to struggle in my eyes.

    Grade: A

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, celebrate Jim’s birthday with a review nine long years in the making…
    Last edited by Jim; 10-16-2018 at 04:01 AM.

  14. #154
    Big Papa's Avatar

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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Ahhh an old favorite. Have a real soft spot for both Devil's Rejects and House of 1,000 Corpses. Saw both in theater, even. The pair of them each offered up individual moments that are amongst my favorite cinematic moments for horror films. In this one, the Freebird sequence at the end. I think I'm just a sucker for a slow motion sequence with no audio and a good song. And this one is very well done. In House of 1,000 Corpses, it was the scene where Otis shoots the officer and there is a LONG drawn out shot before he pulls the trigger.

    From what I recall, the exact dynamic of making the family more sympathetic was kinda controversial when the movie was released.
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  15. #155

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Papa View Post
    Ahhh an old favorite. Have a real soft spot for both Devil's Rejects and House of 1,000 Corpses. Saw both in theater, even. The pair of them each offered up individual moments that are amongst my favorite cinematic moments for horror films. In this one, the Freebird sequence at the end. I think I'm just a sucker for a slow motion sequence with no audio and a good song. And this one is very well done. In House of 1,000 Corpses, it was the scene where Otis shoots the officer and there is a LONG drawn out shot before he pulls the trigger.
    I wouldn't say House holds up that great, but there were some early signs that Zombie had potential, that potential being realized when he made The Devil's Rejects. The House gunshot that took forever was one of the better moments from the film though. Every time I see it, it goes on just long enough that I briefly wonder if my DVD is stuck.

  16. #156
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Man I was a huge White Zombie fan when I was a kid, Astro Creep 2000 is one of the first CD's I ever got. This parlayed into being a massive Rob Zombie fan when Hellbilly Deluxe came out 20 years ago. Being a massive horror fan it was only natural that I fell in love with White/Rob Zombie, then I shat my pants when I learned that he was making his own movie. I remember getting online in school as early as 2000 just to see what was going on with his movie, I was hyped for it for years(it took a LONG time for it to come out), having grown sick and tired of the breakfast club style horror movies that dominated the late 90's early 2000's I just knew that Rob was going to give us a gritty throwback to the real shit.

    All that hype for House of 1,000 Corpses and years of waiting for it and I ended up being pretty underwhelmed when me and some friends went to see it in theaters opening night. It was just ok. I do remember in the theater that night that part where there was that long pause before the cop gets shot, right at just the perfect moment I shouted out "Shoot the motherfucker!" and the whole theater busted out in laughter. I always remember that when I think about Corpses.

    Then Devils Rejects got a lot of love from all my friends, everybody was crazy about it back when it came out. I really had such high hopes for Rob Zombie being a horror director but I was really kinda meh about Devils Rejects, it was better than Corpses but just didn't live up to what I expected from Zombie. The Halloween movies were pure garbage, hated them, Zombie is dead to me now after that shit.
    Last edited by ShinobiMusashi; 10-16-2018 at 07:16 PM.

  17. #157

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinobiMusashi View Post
    Man I was a huge White Zombie fan when I was a kid, Astro Creep 2000 is one of the first CD's I ever got. This parlayed into being a massive Rob Zombie fan when Hellbilly Deluxe came out 20 years ago. Being a massive horror fan it was only natural that I fell in love with White/Rob Zombie, then I shat my pants when I learned that he was making his own movie. I remember getting online in school as early as 2000 just to see what was going on with his movie, I was hyped for it for years(it took a LONG time for it to come out), having grown sick and tired of the breakfast club style horror movies that dominated the late 90's early 2000's I just knew that Rob was going to give us a gritty throwback to the real shit.
    If you needed any other evidence that the movie took forever to come out, look at Fangoria Magazine. House of 1000 Corpses was on the cover of issue #199 (January 2001) and issue #219 (January 2003)!

    All that hype for House of 1,000 Corpses and years of waiting for it and I ended up being pretty underwhelmed when me and some friends went to see it in theaters opening night. It was just ok. I do remember in the theater that night that part where there was that long pause before the cop gets shot, right at just the perfect moment I shouted out "Shoot the motherfucker!" and the whole theater busted out in laughter. I always remember that when I think about Corpses.
    I will never forget my House of 1000 Corpses movie theater "Experience". For the first and only time ever in my life, my older sister actually offered to take me to see a horror movie in a theater and I was psyched to be able to see this movie I was so looking forward to seeing. Then at the theater, they refused to let me in because I wasn't 17 yet and it was a rated R film. Despite the fact that my birthday was just a couple months away and I was technically with someone old enough to see it, they still wouldn't let me in. It's been 15 years, but I'm still salty over it.

    Then Devils Rejects got a lot of love from all my friends, everybody was crazy about it back when it came out. I really had such high hopes for Rob Zombie being a horror director but I was really kinda meh about Devils Rejects, it was better than Corpses but just didn't live up to what I expected from Zombie. The Halloween movies were pure garbage, hated them, Zombie is dead to me now after that shit.
    RZ's Halloween 1 is a mixed bag. When he gets thing right, such as the emotion between some of the characters, he nails beautifully. However, when he gets too far into the Rob Zombie world, it can be god awful. Rather than making the sequel focus on what he did right in the first film, he instead steered towards everything he did wrong.

  18. #158
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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    I love Devil's Rejects so much, I try to pretend most of Zombies other movies didn't happen. I keep hoping his next movie is as good at Devil's Rejects and I'm tired of being let down... and I'm really worried about the new one he's got on the way.
    Rejects does so much right it's frustrating to see someone who clearly has some talent just go in the total opposite direction.

  19. #159

    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Day #17
    Title: Halloween 5
    Country: United States
    Year: 1989
    Director: Dominique Othenin-Girard




    One year after Michael’s apparent death in Halloween 4, he returns to Haddonfield to try and kill his niece, Jamie, once more.


    Sit on back because prior to the review, this is going to feature a bit of a backstory. I’ve went over this before on WC, but now is the ideal to go over it again in full detail. Back in 2009, I was one year removed from the failure that was Fright Fest 2008. In mid 2009, I wanted to attempt another horror movies review thread and with the release of the Friday the 13th remake DVD, it seemed like a perfect time to create a thread dedicated to that slasher franchise. That thread, which can be located here ended up going pretty well. I’m not the happiest with the review format these days, but there was a good amount of participation, I managed to finish the thread (A big deal considering I failed on Fright Fest 2008), and more importantly posters seemed interested in me starting a new horror franchise review thread. At the end of the Friday the 13th thread, there was a brief debate over which franchise I should cover next, A Nightmare on Elm Street or Halloween. Thanks in part due to upcoming release of Rob Zombie’s Halloween 2, everyone seemed to be in favor of covering the Halloween series next. In hindsight, had A Nightmare on Elm Street been selected, Fright Fest may have never returned in 2010.

    The follow up thread covering the Halloween series, which can be found here started off just as well as the Friday the 13th review thread. I managed to post the first four reviews and was even nearly finished writing the review for Halloween 5 when it was time to see Michael Myers on the big screen again with Rob Zombie’s Halloween 2! That was...a mistake. Never before had I come so close to walking out of a theater solely because a movie was so bad. I loathed the movie and frankly, it even killed my interest in watching any more Halloween movies for a bit. The Halloween review thread suddenly went quiet and despite my eventual claims that it would continue, it never did. The Halloween review thread was officially my second horror movie review failure.

    Although that was a failure, it did allow me to return to my original idea of covering one horror movie a day throughout the entire month of October. In October 2010, not only did Fright Fest return, but it was a success and thus created a yearly tradition for WC. Over the years of Fright Fest, some of the Halloween films even managed to be reviewed including Halloween, Halloween 2, Halloween 4, Halloween H20, and ironically enough, the very Halloween that nearly killed my love of the series - Rob Zombie’s Halloween 2 (Complete with an entire paragraph of “Fuck”). Yet, in the back of my mind throughout these last nine years, I kept thinking about the one movie review that failed to be posted on Wrestlingclique. With Michael Myers finally returning to the big screen (Please don’t suck, please don’t suck, please don’t suck), it’s time to finally review Halloween 5, the review that was kept from ever being posted. What follows is my 2018 review of Halloween 5, but at the conclusion of this review in the spoiler tag is that long lost review, having been saved on various computers over the last nine years, just waiting to finally be posted. It will be an incomplete review, showing off what I had finished prior to making the mistake of paying to see Rob Zombie’s Halloween 2. But now, finally the review of Halloween 5…

    Truthfully, I’ve always had a soft spot for Halloween 5. I’m sure it has nearly everything to do with the fact that it’s a direct sequel to my all time favorite movie, Halloween 4. It’s a year later and although it’s a very different plot and loaded with new characters, it looks the same and it’s still ultimately a movie about Michael hunting his young niece while a crazed Dr. Loomis will do anything to prevent any more murders. Being fond of Halloween 5 has allowed me to focus on the strengths of the film and typically just laugh at the bad elements. Well...except for one. Is the movie good? Not especially, but where the film gets things right, it tends to be great.

    Right off the bat, there’s some weirdness in terms of how the story plays out. Halloween 4 ends in some an amazing way with the seven year old Jamie holding up a bloody pair of scissors, having just stabbed her foster mother as Dr. Loomis, Sheriff Brackett, Rachel, and Rachel’s dad looks on with various shocked or overly emotional expressions. It’s an iconic shot that has been my avatar on multiple sites over the years and thanks to a gift from a friend, I even own a framed art piece depicting that visual on my wall. And then Halloween 5 comes around and picking up one year later, the nine year old Jamie (Not sure how she magically ages two years in a single year) is now mute, living in a home for troubled children, has a special relationship with Rachel’s best friend, Tina, and no longer seems to have any bloodlust. It’s not the sort of interesting turn in developments that the ending to Halloween 4 would lead you to believe Halloween 5 would feature, but those changes are fine enough. The other changes...less so.

    These other changes aren’t benefiting the film, but as I said above, most of them I tend to just laugh at because of how ridiculous they are. For starters, there’s the introduction of the two bumbling goofball police officers. Every time they appear on screen, clown music accompanies them. Why? Who could have ever thought that this would be helpful in any way, shape, or form? And yet, it’s also so stupid that it does sometimes get a laugh out of me. Then there’s the drastic change in the Myers home, one of the most iconic houses in horror history. In every other Halloween film that it appears in, it’s your standard two story single family detached house. Thanks to director, Dominique Othenin-Girard, love of all things gothic, the Myers house got a makeover, becoming a dark and moody castle that sticks out like a sore thumb. Again though, it’s such a drastic change that makes zero sense that there’s some humor in it. But then there’s the decision to kill off Rachel, our main heroine from Halloween 4, early to allow Tina to step in as Jamie’s unofficial caregiver. Let me make this abundantly clear...I hate Tina. I hated her the first time I watched Halloween 5, I hated her with this most recent watch, and I’ve hated her for every view in between. Every time she opened her mouth, some absurd line comes out, whether it’s making random noises or talking some rubbish about having a neon heart. I loathe her. She may very well be my least favorite character in movie history. Her involvement also has never made much sense to me. There’s a connection between Rachel and Jamie. They went through hell in Halloween 4 and to put them through it again would make Rachel literally putting herself in front of harm’s way and dying to save Jamie at the end of Halloween 5 (As we’re led to believe that is what happened to Tina, although it’s not 100% clear if she did die) would have been a fitting exit. Instead, we’re forced to try and buy into this relationship between Jamie and one of Rachel’s friends and it doesn’t feel natural. I can easily buy into the fact that when you’re friends with someone, you’d rather not see their younger sister be harmed. To take it a step further, who wants to see any child hurt? It just doesn’t work as well as it would have had Rachel been in Tina’s place.

    Besides that neon heart bint, Halloween 5 also introduces Tina’s boyfriend, the Fonzie lookalike Mikey. The character is pretty over the top, but I think he adds a good amount thanks to the fact that after he’s killed off, Michael uses his car to pick up Tina, creating a legitimately eerie scene as Tina is unaware of the fact that the guy under the mask is not her boyfriend. Besides Mikey, there’s a couple of Tina’s friend in the virginal Samantha and her boyfriend, the doofus, Spitz. Besides learning that she’s thinking about making tonight “The night” with her boyfriend, there’s nothing of real interest when it comes to Samantha. Other than being portrayed by an attractive woman, we don’t get to know anything about her nor are we given a reason to care when she’s predictable killed off. Spitz, on the other hand, is entertaining in a dumb comical sort of way. He’s always acting like a goofball or just generally struggling to come across as being cool. How he landed Samantha is legitimately one of the biggest unanswered questions in the entire franchise because he’s punching well above his belt. After years of watching Halloween 5 and even longer watching Child’s Play 3, I’m only just now learning that the actor who played Spitz, Matthew Walker, is the same guy who played Major Ellis, one of the antagonists that gave Andy such a difficult time at Kent Military School, in Child’s Play 3. Looking back, those golden locks that Walker had in Halloween 5 made him look a lot different compared to shaved head he had in the Chucky sequel. Sadly, Walker is not able to claim the honor of being killed by both Michael Myers and Charles Lee Ray.

    As I mentioned, there are some sincere strengths in the film. They all play towards Jamie Lloyd and her attempts at surviving her deranged uncle. The first came when she believed she was being hunted in the children’s home, chased down into the basement before only learning that it was a simple employee who had been following her, not Michael. It ends up being the real deal in the third act as Jamie tries to flee Michael by going down a laundry chute only for Michael to repeatedly stab through the metal chute for the best scene in the entire movie. Sadly, the MPAA forced some cuts here, preventing the audience from seeing the original planned moment of Jamie actually being stabbed in the leg, although when she does manage to escape the chute, she is shown to be bleeding from the leg and limping. For being a child actor, Danielle Harris does her very best to bring something to a movie that otherwise has some major faults with the script. I’m also a big fan of Dr. Loomis. Throughout the series, there’s a progression of Loomis slowly losing his mind as time goes on and regardless of all of his warnings, little is done to stop Michael. Here, he’s in his most bat-shit crazy mode, just completely frustrated and exhausted to the point that he’s not going to worry about going along with the generally accepted plans. He’s going to do things his way. This involved pulling a gun on a police officer and even dangling a terrified Jamie in front of him to lure Michael into a trap while in the Myers house. Ultimately, the driving force of Dr. Loomis at this point in my opinion is that he knows that his remaining time on this earth is limited and literally the only thing that matters to him anymore is being able to stop Michael before his time is up. He gets in one of the best quotes in the series as he tries to push Sheriff Meeker into believing him once more:

    “*Holds up burned hand*
    Look at this
    *Points towards burned side of his face*
    look at that.
    I prayed that he would burn in Hell,
    but in my heart I knew that Hell would not have him.”

    Another addition of Halloween 5 is the introduction of the mysterious Man in Black. At various points in the film, a man clad in all black is shown around town including inside of the Myers home. His identity is unknown as is his intentions in Haddonfield. All we know about him is that he has the same obscure mark on his inner wrist that Michael has. Could he be connected to Michael? It’s not until the final minutes of the film that the Man in Black finally reveals his purpose in Haddonfield, but that only creates more questions than answers, which sadly were finally answered in Halloween 6 to...disappointing results. Still, I dig the Man in Black if for no other reason than for the fact that there’s just this giant question mark about him. He feels so out of place in such a movie. It’s a small thing, but I’m also a total sucker for the amazingly cheesy soundtrack. It’s filled with cringeworthy 80s beats that entertains me so much that I even bought the soundtrack on CD years ago. The soundtrack is fantastic and damn anyone if they disagree.

    Overall, Halloween 5 is a direct sequel to Halloween 4 in name only. There’s a lot of things very different about it, nearly everything bad, but some of which are so bad that it’s entertaining. Much like with Halloween 4, Jamie Lloyd and Dr. Loomis are there to carry the film, although the lack of Rachel as a major character is rather disappointing, particularly when compared to her replacement. The introduction of the Man in Black and the insane ending would cause Halloween fans to eagerly await the reveal of what’s truly been happening for six long years before the release of the infamous Halloween 6. Is it a good movie? No, but do I greatly enjoy watching it? Always.

    Grade: C

    Fright in motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    The incomplete 2009 review of Halloween 5:

    Spoiler:


    The Story

    We're taking back to the events of Halloween 1988 with Michael on the roof of the truck. Michael is thrown off, hit by the truck, has his hand held by Jamie and is shot by a dozen or so men. As the police throw dynamite in the hole, Michael is able to find a way out and travels down the river. Myers crawls out and finds a hermit living in a makeshift cabin. Michael doesn't have the strength to kill him and passes out. The hermit takes off the mask and takes care of Michael.

    One year (Kind of) passes. Jamie is now a mute due to the stress and mental breakdown of stabbing her foster mother. She's living at Haddonfield's child institution. Once Michael wakes up from his "One year" coma he kills the hermit and once again free. However, starting with that night, Jamie seems to have a mental bond with her uncle. Basically, she can tell when Michael is up to his evil deeds. While her parents are away, Rachel is still stopping by to see Jamie. We're introduced to Rachel's new best friend, Tina. Tina convinces Rachel to stay in town rather than going to the cottage with her parents. At home, Rachel is taking a shower when Jamie once again has visions of her uncle. Dr. Loomis, even more crazed, calls the house to warn Rachel. Two police man, with their own clown music, checks out the house, but can't find any trace of Myers. Once everyone leaves, Rachel is killed off by Michael.

    With Rachel dead, but assumed to have changed her mind and gone to the cottage, we're introduced to a new set of character. These would include Tina's other best friend, Sam. Sam's dorky boyfriend Spitz. Tina's boyfriend, the Fronzy lookalike, Mikey. Finally, there was Billy, Jamie's friend and crush at the institution. Besides an annoying stutter, we never find out why Billy was there. While Tina and her friends prepare for a big Halloween barn party, Loomis desperately tries to get answers from Jamie as to the whereabouts of Michael.

    Shortly before the barn party, Jamie has a vision of Tina in trouble. The cops would end up picking her up and bringing her to the institution. The happiness of seeing Tina alive gives Jamie the ability to talk again. Against Jamie's pleas, Tina heads to the party. Jamie and Billy escape and starts their walk to the party in hopes of helping Tina. As expected, Michael shows up at the party and Tina's friends and the cops are killed off. Right as Michael looks to run down Tina, Jamie and Billy show up and the chase is on. Luckily for Jamie, Michael loses control of the car and crashes into a tree. He doesn't stay "Dead" for long as he stabs Tina when she threw herself in front of Jamie. Jamie and Billy runs off in the woods until Dr. Loomis finds them. As the police leave the woods, Loomis yells out into the woods telling Michael he will bring Jamie to Michael's home and that if Michael wants to end this, be there.

    The offer is a trap as swat police are stationed all over the property. As Jamie is up in Judith's room, she has a vision that Billy is in trouble. All of the police except one leaves. Loomis knows exactly what's going on though. Michael will now come since the numbers aren't high. Loomis heads downstairs where he finds Michael. In a moment where it looks like he's getting through to Michael, Loomis is surprised with a stab. Jamie is then left alone playing a game of cat and mouse in a laundry chute until she heads to the attic where she finds the bodies of the Rachel, Max and others. Climbing in a casket that Michael dug up, she pleads "Uncle" and that gets Michael to stop for the moment. She asks to see his face and surprisingly, Michael takes off his mask with a single tear on his cheek. When Jamie goes to wipe it away, Michael wakes up and the monster takes over again. To Jamie's luck, Dr. Loomis is still alive and has set up a trap for Michael. With a large heavy chain net falling on him, Loomis beats Michael down with a piece of wood (That came out far more sexual than it was supposed to. ) Loomis collapses on Michael and it appears as if it's finally over.

    As the movie comes to an end, Jamie is shown Michael in a holding cell at the police station. Throughout the movie, we were shown shots of a mysterious man in black walking around Haddonfield. The drug store that Brady worked at in the last movie, the Myers' house, outside of the institution and finally, walking into the police station. As Jamie is in a police cruiser waiting to be taken back home, an explosion is heard followed by gun shots. The cop who was take Jamie home rushes inside to find out what happened. After waiting a few minutes, Jamie slowly walks into the police station to find body after body of the police force. Coming to the jail cell, the bars have been blown out. Michael is gone. The evil has escaped again.

    The Characters

    Jamie - Unable to talk since the last movie, Jamie is living in an institution while trying to come to grips with what she did.

    Dr. Loomis - More obsessed than ever to find Michael. His patience is a lot lower and no longer cares about the emotional state of others.

    Tina - Rachel's best friend. Once Rachel is killed off, she becomes the teenage heroine of the movie. Besides being annoying, she's the girlfriend of Mikey.

    Samantha - Tina's other best friend. Seems to be a likable character, but we don't see enough of her. Girlfriend of Spitz.

    Billy - Jamie's only friend her age. Stutters and is generally hated by Halloween fans.

    Mikey - A Fonzy rip off who looks to be in his thirties, despite dating Tina.

    The Man in Black - An unknown man who arrives in Haddonfield. Appears to have some connection with Michael.

    Michael Myers - After being in a coma for a year, Michael wakes up and goes after Jamie again. A tattoo-like image is now on the inside of his wrist.

    The Verdict

    After the success of Halloween 4, it was decided to strike again while the iron was hot. For the first time in Halloween history, a Michael Myers film would come out a year after the last one. (Note: Michael Myers, not Halloween). The question was, would they be able to make another Halloween film that would be a hit among the fans or would this be another major strike against the series?

    All questions would be answered by director Dominique Othenin-Girard. This European had an entirely different idea for what a Halloween film would be. As a result, the film bares very little resemblance to the last movie. The best example for what this film is is the Myers house. It's technically the Myers house, but it's a medieval castle. For those that haven't seen Halloween 5 or may just not remember the house well:

    Myers House - Halloween 1 (From '78 scenes)


    It's pretty much what most people think of when someone mentions the house.

    Myers House - Halloween 5


    How in the hell can you pick such an unrecognizable house? Since the filming was done in Utah as opposed to California in the original, I can understand that you need to find a new house. But a fuckin' castle? Sadly, there's a lot of similar things in the movie. Characters and moments that seems Halloween-like, but not totally.

    Characters is another case of changing dramatically in only one year. Sheriff Meeker goes from helping Loomis out without any proof in the first movie, yet he has to have his arm twisted to help Loomis this time. The serial killer who murdered your daughter is possibly back, yet you want to deny it? WTF? Similarly, the beloved Rachel doesn't even act like herself. Early in the movie when Loomis calls informing her to get out of the house, she acts as if she doesn't take it serious. She just dealt with Michael nearly killing her one year ago, why is she taking things so lighthearted?

    While some characters aren't themselves, there's others who just do not belong. For example, there's Tina. Tina is quite possibly the single most hated character in the entire Halloween series by fans. Why would they have her be the star when they have Rachel? It doesn't make sense to kill off Jamie's lone family member in town to have a friend (That we didn't even know about in the last movie) act as if she cares so much about Jamie. While it's not unrealistic that help out a friend's sister, the amount that she cares comes off as just that - unrealistic. Her boyfriend, Mikey, seems to be a joke who's sole purpose is to create jokes of Michael killing Michael. Spitz, isn't much better by being so annoying throughout the entire movie. Yet, he somehow has the beautiful and likable Samantha as his girlfriend. Much like with Rachel, I don't understand why Samantha isn't the star over Tina. She actually comes off as normal. To further put over the joke of this movie, there's the pair of cops complete with their own clown music every time they're on screen. Did the director really think it would be funny? It comes off as childish and lame. Then there's the ultimate character who does not belong.

    The Man in Black, if nothing else, creates a certain level of suspense and intrigue otherwise absent from the movie. Who is he and why is he there? Perhaps even more so than the house changes, the Man in Black illustrates just how horrible of a writer/director Othenin-Girard truly is. Who was the Man in Black, you may wonder? Well, if you asked back before 1995, you wouldn't have been told. Othenin-Girard actually created a mystery character without even knowing who he was going to turn out to be. Seriously, think about this for a minute. You're directing the next installment of a popular series. You end up creating a character without any care of figuring out who he should be. There has been rumors that the Man in Black could have been Michael's father or his long lost brother. This belief is back up with Don Shanks (Michael Myers) playing the Man in Black as well.

    The job of saving the movie falls on the shoulders of Donald Pleasence and young Danielle Harris. Once again, both ends up doing a great job with a limited script.

    ---

    Coming up next, if Fright Fest TEN has taught us anything, it’s that bank heists always goes so well...

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    Re: Fright Fest TEN: Jim Terrifies in Space (not really in space)

    Going back to La Casa Muda for a moment, I'd say there's two things memorable about it. One was the little bit they did with the camera as it was a pretty unnerving sequence and definitely the best one in the movie. The second is that it's one of the rare instances where the American remake is better than the foreign original. That doesn't happen very often and it's made even more impressive when you consider how quickly it was made and released. The only other thing I think I'd mention about it is that it was Uruguay's submission for the Academy Awards in the year of its release, although it didn't make the short list.

    In regards to The Devil's Rejects, my favourite moments came from watching the rather uncomfortable performance from former Three's Company actress Priscilla Barnes as Gloria. It's just so odd seeing her in such a different role than the one she was most well known for. I'd also imagine she's the only person in film history to be killed by Benicio Del Toro (Licence to Kill) and Sheri Moon Zombie, so that's something I guess.

    As far as Zombie as a director goes, I've always felt like The Devil's Rejects was him catching lightning in a bottle and that he'll never quite get back to that level again. That being said, I thought The Lords of Salem was a fairly well accomplished film that showed his maturity as a director. Maybe he's got another gem in his future if that's any indication, though I have to say I haven't really had any desire to check out 31 to this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim
    For starters, there’s the introduction of the two bumbling goofball police officers. Every time they appear on screen, clown music accompanies them. Why? Who could have ever thought that this would be helpful in any way, shape, or form? And yet, it’s also so stupid that it does sometimes get a laugh out of me.
    I hated, hated, HATED these guys as much as you hate Tina on my first viewing of the movie. On subsequent viewings they've become one of my favourite parts because they do help to inject some humour into a film that, for the most part, is pretty dark. The ridiculous circus music only helps and I'm not going to lie when I say I was sad when they were killed, if only because that meant the end of the music for the rest of the movie. That theme didn't happen to make it onto the soundtrack did it?

    But then there’s the decision to kill off Rachel, our main heroine from Halloween 4, early to allow Tina to step in as Jamie’s unofficial caregiver.
    I mean, I get what they were going for in the sense that they wanted to show that no character was safe. Unfortunately they didn't bother to have a good enough character ready to step in and take Rachel's place and, while I don't hate Tina nearly as much as you, I'd be lying if I said she was even remotely up to the task. My least favourite Tina moment is that horrendous dialogue she spews to Jamie about "when you get older you meet people that just make you feel so good that you want to be around them all the time." I can't imagine anyone feeling "so good" around her, at least not for an extended period of time.

    I’m also a big fan of Dr. Loomis. Throughout the series, there’s a progression of Loomis slowly losing his mind as time goes on and regardless of all of his warnings, little is done to stop Michael. Here, he’s in his most bat-shit crazy mode, just completely frustrated and exhausted to the point that he’s not going to worry about going along with the generally accepted plans.
    There's no doubt that he's at his crazy best here. The early scenes where he's browbeating Jamie while trying to get her to reveal her connection to Michael are bordering on child abuse yet it all seems perfectly normal to him. As an outside observer, you understand why he's doing it, but to the characters around him in the movie he seems like a total kook.

    One thing I'm surprised you left out was the incredible commentary track on the DVD/Blu-Ray from everyone's favourite crazy director Dominique Othenin-Girard with Danielle Harris and Jeffrey Landman. When we're not being treated to creepy comments like how DOG enjoyed taking little Danielle out for ice cream during a screening of the film or how he thought it was funny that the police were called for a false alarm, we're privy to Landman's ridiculous total recall from the set. He may have played an annoying character but luckily he remembered EVERYTHING about the experience. It's one of my favourite commentary tracks and I try to listen to it at least once a year around this time. In fact, I may just do that today.


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