Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

  1. #1
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    NJPW When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Thought this would be an interesting question to ask. I'm sure some watch being watching for decades (probably not ). Some may have only started in the last year or so. Perhaps you got an interesting story to how you came to watching New Japan or you started at a big occasion like Wrestle Kingdom 12. So give us your story on how and maybe why you started watching New Japan Pro Wrestling and if possible anything you remember from that event.

    I'll start. I've been watching New Japan since late 2012. More specifically, NJPW Power Struggle 2012. I was on Youtube around this time looking for old school WWE clips and I came across a YouTube video named Power Struggle so I clicked on it and I was intrigued by the different setting of the shows, presentation etc. So I looked at the cards and I saw a slightly familiar name in Prince Devitt. So I decided to watch his match against Low Ki and a few other matches on the card. This match is what I took from the show. More so his entrance than anything. At the time, which was before he created Bullet Club, Devitt came out to "You're The Best" by Joe Esposito. Most of you would recognize it from The Karate Kid film(s). I was hooked by the music and I became a fan of the show, eager to learn more about it. As crazy as that sounds, the music got me more into New Japan. Another thing that I took away was the cards. Looking at the cards, I saw loads of tag matches and with me having very little access to Japanese wrestling other than a few NOAH matches, I assumed that Power Struggle was New Japan's version of Survivor Series. In hindsight this is highly amusing and people who I've told this story to have always had a smile on their faces afterwards. The main event was Hiroshi Tanahashi vs Yujiro Takahashi for those wondering.

    That is when I started watching New Japan. Have any of you got any interesting stories on the subject?
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

  2. #2
    ozzyozyakup10
    Oz's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Izmir
    Posts
    289
    Rep Power
    38734
      Country                    Turkey

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    I had a few friends starting to watch it during Devitt's Bullet Club era but I got into it in G1 Climax 26. I remember Goto vs Marufuji being the match that convinced me to follow New Japan regularly. I wish I had started earlier since most of the wrestling there makes sense and doesn't require spending the night in front of a computer screen in order to watch it live.

  3. #3
    YES! YES! YES!

    Ed's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Dudley, England
    Posts
    32,971
    Rep Power
    1317787
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    I believe I started in late August 2012 after Jim had started a string of reviews on New Japan which encouraged me to give them a shot. The first match from them I ever saw was Liger and Tiger Mask Vs Taichi and TAKA which was actually really good as it was during a heated feud and it encouraged me to watch the rest of Dominion 2012. So I basically missed the very start of the Okada era but was probably a year or so ahead of when New Japan really started to explode in popularity with new fans online. I don't think I've missed a major show since then. Let me tell you, back in those days Karl Anderson was a very good wrestler!

  4. #4
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oz View Post
    I had a few friends starting to watch it during Devitt's Bullet Club era but I got into it in G1 Climax 26. I remember Goto vs Marufuji being the match that convinced me to follow New Japan regularly. I wish I had started earlier since most of the wrestling there makes sense and doesn't require spending the night in front of a computer screen in order to watch it live.
    Huh, Marufuji vs Goto? It's funny because Marufuji wasn't a New Japan regular, only ever showing up every few years. I do remember the match been really good. Big fan of both wrestlers, especially Marufuji.
    Last edited by MC 16; 07-28-2018 at 05:25 PM.
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

  5. #5
    ozzyozyakup10
    Oz's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Izmir
    Posts
    289
    Rep Power
    38734
      Country                    Turkey

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Quote Originally Posted by MC 16 View Post
    Huh, Marufuji vs Goto? It's funny because Marufuji wasn't a New Japan regular, only ever showing up every few years. I do remember the match been really good. Big fan of both wrestlers, especially Marufuji.
    Yeah, that match was great. Seeing a match like that convinced me there is more than WWE in wrestling scene, and I would miss out a lot if I didn't follow New Japan regularly. Then I watched older stuff like Suzuki vs Tanahashi match in KOPW 2012. That match is still my favourite match in general, alongside with Okada vs Shibata.

  6. #6
    Scumbag Role Model
    Tennessee Nicky's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    46,324
    Rep Power
    1009369
      Country                    United States

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Started watching regularly after WrestleKingdom 7.

    Honestly haven’t watched a lot of stuff from before that.
    -------
    Quote Originally Posted by RaiZ-R View Post
    What the fuck is happening to you guys? I once got a blowjob where she used her teeth a little bit too much and I ended up with a bloody dick, I still enjoyed the blowjob up to the point I started bleeding. I can honestly say that I have never had anything I would call a bad blowjob, that wasn't a great experience but up until I started gushing blood I was having a great time!
    Spoiler:


  7. #7
    "Above Average"
    Codename Bags's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Margaritaville
    Posts
    317
    Rep Power
    53379
      Country                    United States

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    The first time I actually sat and watched a full New Japan show front to back was Wrestle Kingdom in 2015. Obviously, I'd seen matches my whole life. Whether it be Chris Benoit as the Pegasus Kid wrestling Liger, or the Global Impact specials with TNA back in the day, but as far as getting invested into the product, the first show I watched was Wrestle Kingdom 9.


  8. #8
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    BXSTXRD's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    191
    Rep Power
    16697
      Country                    Canada

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Just after Wrestle Kingdom 10, by watching that event solely on the praise AJ vs. Nakamura was getting and I have been a huge fan of AJ for many years prior. Really glad I did because I have grown to become a huge fan.

  9. #9
    BTB Legend
    EgoFantastico's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,320
    Rep Power
    36830

    Reply

    I started watching New Japan in the early 90s after seeing Jushin Liger wrestle Brian Pillman in WCW. I’d get tapes on a regular basis and keep up with what was going on through magazines and such. I soured on New Japan when Antonio Inoki’s fuckwittery destroyed Shinya Hashimoto’s career, and stopped watching them altogether when that fuckwittery almost destroyed the company itself. I started following New Japan again in 2003, lured back by the combination of Jun Akiyama being part of the G1 and Yuji Nagata’s match with Kenta Kobashi. Nagata was the young lion that I’d had highest hopes for, and it was his treatment at Inoki’s hands that was the tipping point for me walking away from New Japan. And I’d always been a big fan of Kobashi and was confident that the match between the two would be fantastic.

    From there, I’d start getting a few tapes and DVD’s here and there, got back to following them again, and it was a slow and steady return from there to once more being a regular viewer.



    BTB Newcomer of the Year 2012
    BTB of the Year 2012





  10. #10
    Heel Champion
    Dodger's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3,878
    Rep Power
    2570

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Can you explain the Inoki comments please out of interest?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dodger View Post
    Can you explain the Inoki comments please out of interest?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm sure Ego will tell you more specifically about what he is talking about but I think he is is talking about Inoki getting Naoya Ogawa to shoot on Shinya Hashimoto during a a match, legitimately beating him up and eventually pushing him out of New Japan. Though the first part is unconfirmed.

    As far as Nagata and Inoki is concerned, Inoki forced him (and others) to wrestle MMA fights, putting Nagata against the likes of Mirko Cro-Crop and Fedor. And then tossing him to the side when he, unsurprisingly, lost.
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

  12. #12
    BTB Legend
    EgoFantastico's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,320
    Rep Power
    36830

    Reply

    Quote Originally Posted by Dodger View Post
    Can you explain the Inoki comments please out of interest?
    Rather than go through the whole aggravating mess myself, I shall defer to portions of Hashimoto’s obituary from the Observer; as well as detailing the events, it serves as a decent history lesson for few other things;

    Spoiler:


    It was Hashimoto's credibility as a tough guy that was in many ways prostituted by Inoki to try and create a new mainstream star in Naoya Ogawa. One of the most talked about modern pro wrestling matches in Japan took place on New Japan's annual January 4" show in 1999. Although tt was not the main event, it was Japan's equivalent to the 1997 Survivor Series, a match where the postmatch intrigue was bigger than the match itself. Unlike that one, it was followed up, and unlike that one, while it was believed to have been a double-cross on Hashimoto, it was a shoot, but not a double-cross. Ogawa had been training hard on his kickboxing, and while Hashimoto was thought to be tough, Inoki knew Ogawa was tougher, was doing real training and was thus in far better shape. He told Ogawa to go all out. Hashimoto was not double-crossed, as many thought, since it later came out he was told ahead of time this was going to be basically a shoot with a predetermined finish, as when he got in trouble, he could hit the ref to end it as a no contest.

    However, virtually nobody else was informed, and the wrestlers freaked out at what happened. It lasted just 6:58, all of it with Ogawa just beating Hashimoto to death in a one-sided battle, more brutal than most MMA matches because Ogawa both attacked Hashimoto's spine and kicked him hard in the face before Hashimoto decided it was time to end it by knocking the ref down. Ogawa was an instant superstar because the public believed it was real, and because it was so one-sided.

    The idea New Japan was would build him for a match with Rickson Gracie, which would be the biggest money match of all-time, and hope the bigger Ogawa improved to the point he could win. But the long-term idea of what they were building never came close to fruition. But it did set the stage for the huge television ratings Ogawa drew over the next six years.

    In Japan, it set the stage for the beginnings of more realistic looking matches, which, unfortunately were overdone and ran their course and were still being booked long past when they had lost their steam, because they had worked so well at first and the promotion kept hoping to recreate its success.

    Hashimoto-Ogawa was super hot at the time, and this match led to a climactic match which was the most watched pro wrestling match on television anywhere in the world in more than a decade. The monster somewhat backfired, since Ogawa broke ties with Inoki, and also fell out of favor with New Japan because he refused to be professional in a tag match involving Riki Choshu.

    Hashimoto and Ogawa had three more memorable matches in what was the hottest program in Japan of its time.

    It should be noted that Hashimoto and Ogawa had a record five singles matches on Dome shows. Their program actually dated back to April 12, 1997. New Japan booked a special Dome show after getting a verbal agreement from Ken Shamrock, coming out of UFC as a major worldwide celebrity. The verbal agreement was Shamrock would work four shows for $300,000 at the Dome. In his first match, Shamrock, still the biggest star in UFC and a celebrity in Japan from his days as the face of Pancrase, would lose when challenging Hashimoto for the title. Shamrock in return would beat Hashimoto and become only the third American, after Hulk Hogan and Big Van Vader, to capture the title. However, WWE made a stronger offer and Shamrock left New Japan holding the bag with a huge building on a special date and no main event.

    Ogawa, who represented Japan as a superheavyweight in judo in the 1992 and 1996 Olympics, winning a silver in 1992, was going to debut on the undercard. New Japan needed to create something with impact, so Ogawa, in his pro wrestling debut, billed at the time as a judo vs. wrestling showdown, coming out as a judo fighter in a gi, beat the IWGP champion clean in a non-title match before a reported crowd of 60,500. This set up a May 3, 1997, at the Osaka Dome, which was packed, with 53,000 announced (43,000 would be more likely), as Hashimoto won and retained the title, and pro wrestling got its revenge on judo, and New Japan created the illusion that the IWGP belt was the strongest belt in combat sports.

    Hashimoto and New Japan were at their peak at the time, with Hashimoto leading New Japan to wins over shoot fighting (Takada) and judo, which only shows just how much the world of wrestling has changed in eight years.

    The rematch was on the October 11, 1999, show at the Dome before a reported 58,000 fans (again, take off 10,000 to 15,000), with Ogawa retaining the NWA world heavyweight title in a match that hardly resembled the classic
    NWA title matches. The match was a stiff as hell bout, worked using mostly MMA positioning, such as punches from the mount. It was not back-and-forth like pro wrestling for the most part, although Hashimoto was able to get his fiery comeback in after taking a beating. At another point, Hashimoto took off his grappling gloves and started making a comeback with bare knuckle punches. Ogawa finally hit his STO, and began punching and kicking Hashimoto at will until Inoki jumped in to stop the fight.

    The finish was built off the famous Andre the Giant vs. Akira Maeda match, which turned into a shoot, and ended when Inoki jumped in the ring to stop it. Fans in the building hated the finish, however, as MMA was not yet popularized, and people wanted a clean pinfall or submission, and not a stoppage based on a guy not defending himself and taking punishment.

    The two sold out the Dome on January 4, 2000. Although not positioned as the main event, it was clearly the big draw on the show, as they did another match that was a worked shoot, at the time not an overdone cliché, and tore the house down, with Hashimoto and Takashi Iizuka beating Ogawa and Kazunari Murakami This match also started out as being out of control, as Murakami got Iizuka on the ground and was punching him from the mount until he knocked him out. It turned into a bench clearing brawl and was ruled a no contest in 2:24. Inoki came in the ring again and yelled at all the participants for brawling instead of doing a clean fight. Iizuka ended up choking Murakami out to win in 8:59, leaving Ogawa and Hashimoto open ended.

    Hashimoto challenged Ogawa to another singles match at a special Tokyo Dome show on April 7, 2000, which was a rare live network TV special. It was a funny deal, because from a live standpoint, by the standards of New Japan Tokyo Dome events, it wasn't a big draw. Legitimately, there were probably closer to 40,000 fans there, although it was promoted more as a live network special at the time on a Friday night than as a live event.

    All of the hype at the time was based on the return of Friday night wrestling, a fixture from the 80s peak period, and Hashimoto vowing to retire if he didn't get his revenge and beat Ogawa. Hashimoto vs. Ogawa drew 34 million viewers and a 24.0 rating for the main event. The number doesn't sound as impressive today as it was at the time, because of the mainstream popularity of PRIDE and K-1. But it was the single most watched pro. wrestling match ort television in the. world ( even Hogan vs. Andre on NBC in 1998 drew a tad fewer viewers and nothing from the modern era drew more than one-third that) since an Antonio Inoki vs. Leon Spinks match in
    1986.

    The problem? Of course, it was built for Hashimoto to finally get his win. And he fans knew. On a live special, they had a phone poll, with more than one million phone calls coming in, and about two-thirds expected Hashimoto to win. The phone poll showed the general public knew pro wrestling was worked in some form, since Ogawa had destroyed Hashimoto in their previous meetings, but they expected Hashimoto to win because he vowed to retire and it was his turn.

    When Inoki got to the Tokyo Dome, he changed the finish. His reasoning wasn't because people expected Hashimoto to win, but his feeling that Ogawa had greatly surpassed Hashimoto as a television star and he needed to protect him more because he had big dollar signs than save the less marketable Hashimoto. With Antonio Inoki, representing Ogawa, and New Japan president Seiji Sakaguchi, representing Hashimoto, at ringside, it was a battle of hard kicks vs. judo throws, with Ogawa winning via ten count knockout using the STO.

    Hashimoto was majorly screwed. He had take time off to sell the retirement. He came back on October 9, 2000, in the opening match at the Dome. Kensuke Sasaki had taken his spot as New Japan's representative when it came to fighting outsiders, as the Dome was sold out for the dream match of New Japan's top star against All Japan's top star (Toshiaki Kawada) for the first time in history.

    On November 13, 2000, Hashimoto was fired by New Japan after being on the outs with booker Riki Choshu. Later, this was played up for a big Tokyo Dome match between the two of them for Choshu to come out of retirement. In Japan, at the time it happened in 2000, it was considered historically one of the three biggest firings of a wrestler in the history of the country, along with JWP's firing of I noki in 1971 when he failed a power play to take over and
    New Japan's firing of Akira Maeda in 1988 after failing to accept punishment for doing a shoot kick to Riki Choshu several months earlier, because he got financial backing to start up his own group.

    There was resentment among the wrestlers that Hashimoto was drawing his $400,000 per year salary, but rarely wrestling, since they had to keep him out of action due to the retirement stipulation, plus had done an angle where he was not touring to make the Ogawa matches on the Dome shows bigger. He only worked three matches for the company that year, all at the Dome. Choshu was mad Hashimoto was reluctant to put over Manabu Nakanishi and Yuji Nagata, who he was grooming to push on top. Choshu himself wanted Nakanishi to beat Hashimoto in his return from losing the retirement match, but Tatsumi Fujinami volunteered to lose to Hashimoto, feeling another loss at that point would have destroyed him as a draw.

    At a four-hour booking meeting on 11/10, Choshu, Sasaki, Chono, Shiro Koshinaka and Katsuji Nagashima all voted to fire him, with Sasaki pushing the hardest. Fujinami, who was the closest to him after volunteering to put him over a month earlier, was furious at being the only one to vote to keep him. Hashimoto had been talking to Mitsuharu Misawa for five months, and it was known internally, with the feeling he was going to leave anyway when his contract was up.

    Hashimoto ended up getting a financial backer, and opened up tile Zero-One gym, and was going to run shows on his own. After being fired, this led to it being a regular promotion. Some of this was also an angle, as New Japan was happy to get his big salary off the books after they believed Inoki had ruined his tough guy gimmick, but also knew that if he ran a separate promotion, it would lead to inter-promotional business down the line, that New Japan big shows had been built around.


    As for Inoki’s fuckwittery almost killing New Japan, like MC said, it was forcing New Japan wrestlers into real fights. As PRIDE and K-1 were gaining popularity, Inoki’s bright idea was for New Japan wrestlers to prove they were the toughest fighters in the world by taking on and beating fighters from those organizations. Unfortunately, after that idea backfired, repeatedly, Inoki then had the even brighter idea of bringing real fighters into New Japan and pushing them to the moon, putting them over the homegrown talent at just about every turn. And it was done in a manner where New Japan wrestlers were made to look decidedly second rate and the popularity of the company plummeted accordingly. It was until Inoki sold his controlling share in New Japan in 2005 that they were able to make an effective start on crawling out of the hole that Inoki had put them in.



    BTB Newcomer of the Year 2012
    BTB of the Year 2012





  13. #13
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    All of the hype at the time was based on the return of Friday night wrestling, a fixture from the 80s peak period, and Hashimoto vowing to retire if he didn't get his revenge and beat Ogawa. Hashimoto vs. Ogawa drew 34 million viewers and a 24.0 rating for the main event. The number doesn't sound as impressive today as it was at the time, because of the mainstream popularity of PRIDE and K-1. But it was the single most watched pro. wrestling match ort television in the. world ( even Hogan vs. Andre on NBC in 1998 drew a tad fewer viewers and nothing from the modern era drew more than one-third that) since an Antonio Inoki vs. Leon Spinks match in
    That can't be right. 34 Million? I know that this was a big drawing match but this seems like an unlikely number. Wow
    Last edited by MC 16; 08-01-2018 at 03:47 PM.
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

  14. #14
    Big Papa's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,081
    Rep Power
    185546

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed View Post
    I believe I started in late August 2012 after Jim had started a string of reviews on New Japan which encouraged me to give them a shot. The first match from them I ever saw was Liger and Tiger Mask Vs Taichi and TAKA which was actually really good as it was during a heated feud and it encouraged me to watch the rest of Dominion 2012. So I basically missed the very start of the Okada era but was probably a year or so ahead of when New Japan really started to explode in popularity with new fans online. I don't think I've missed a major show since then. Let me tell you, back in those days Karl Anderson was a very good wrestler!
    Hmmmm.... I seem to remember pimping puroresu to you for quite a while before you started watching.

    Quote Originally Posted by MC 16 View Post
    That can't be right. 34 Million? I know that this was a big drawing match but this seems like an unlikely number. Wow
    Ummm.... maybe? Its possible. Japanese TV is a big different. But a bit of quick research says there is about 48 million households in Japan currently and about 2.5 people per household. If the rating is a percentage of total possible viewers, then it might be. Cable was not and is not a big thing in Japan, so terrestrial TV stations are still the norm and I don't think that you have the specialization of channels that you do in America and elsewhere. Considering this probably would been early to mid 90s, fewer channel options, etc.... I wouldn't say its necessary IMPOSSIBLE, especially if its considered one of the largest TV audiences every to watch a match.

    As for the original question... Been watching sporadically since about 2008. Came back to watching wrestling that year after missing about 5-6 years. Wanted to go beyond the WWE almost immediately, and ROH was kinda interesting. In digging into ROH's history, I fell in love with the Joe vs Punk stuff and then found Joe vs Kobashi. And Kobashi has been a favorite ever since. That took me down the puro rabbithole, particularly due to Ditch's site. Heavy emphasis on 90s All Japan and early Noah. Dove into the history of New Japan a bit, and particularly took a liking to Hashimoto. I watched current product pretty sporadically, notably when some hype came out about a particular match. Since the golden period started about 5-6 years ago, I watched a bit more. But again, not consistently in-depth. Watching the G1 show by show as I finally subscribed to New Japan World.


  15. #15

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Papa View Post
    Hmmmm.... I seem to remember pimping puroresu to you for quite a while before you started watching.
    Clearly my opinion meant loads more to him than yours.

    My first NJPW show was day one of the 2011 G1 Climax. Nagata and Tanahashi had a killer match, Nakamura shined as a sleazeball, Hideo Saito (Captain New Japan) became my favorite lousy wrestler but fun character, and I was first exposed to the overrated shit that was La Sombra. I believe I watched some of day 2 before going quiet on NJPW until 2012. That's when I got really into the promotion thanks to Nakamura, Devitt, Naito, ect.

    Naturally, I fucked off right before NJPW became super popular.

  16. #16
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    It seems La Sombra follows Jim everywhere he goes


    I am noticing a pattern of early 2010's starting points which isn't totally surprising.
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

  17. #17
    BTB Legend
    EgoFantastico's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,320
    Rep Power
    36830

    Reply

    Quote Originally Posted by MC 16 View Post
    That can't be right. 34 Million? I know that this was a big drawing match but this seems like an unlikely number. Wow
    That number is accurate.



    BTB Newcomer of the Year 2012
    BTB of the Year 2012





  18. #18
    WAKE UP

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    31,679
    Rep Power
    87964

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Started watching probably late 2000's, few years after I got into non-WWE wrestling in general. Indy wrestling first, then puro. Those who have been watching for a long time may remember Ditch's old site - guy had hours and hours of puro footage dating all the way back to JWA and Rikidozan. I actually started from the begining and watched most of the footage on that site in chronological order. I was actively following puro and watching current stuff probably 2007-2008? Remember when I first started watching regularly Mutoh was going through his last title run - which sucked. Nakamura and Tanahashi were coming into their roles as aces. Okada hadn't even debuted by that point I don't think.

    Watching through chronologically made me appreciate the better years of NJPW - it was never the best wrestling promotion in Japan but did have some great talents such as Fujinami, Hase, most of the Junior division in the 90s, and of course big Hash. I followed the promotion and the whole puro scene regularly from that point up until I stopped a few years ago, mostly because I had no interest in 90% of the roster. I could ignore someone like Devitt in the juniors division - the division consistently sucked since the early 2000s. However once Bullet Club became a thing that was the final straw for me.

  19. #19
    Big Papa's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,081
    Rep Power
    185546

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    Ditch's wrestling site is still up. Not getting updated anymore but I think most of the hosted matches are still available. Such a treasure trove. The fact that you watched thru it in sequence is insane, Steventon.


  20. #20
    TAKE THE DREAM~

    MC 16's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nippon Budokan
    Posts
    5,290
    Rep Power
    346596
      Country                    England

    Re: When did you begin watching New Japan Pro Wrestling?

    All the way through? I like to do the same with new companies I find but never on such a grand scale.
    Spoiler:


    Milano Forever!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •