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Thread: WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

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    WWE Network WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

    Wrestlefest ‘93
    January 30, 1993



    A random tidbit that likely no one else will care about. Although I’m watching this on the WWE Network, the video file I’m taking gifs from is from the Silvervision Home Video. For whatever reason, the WWE Network/Coliseum Home Video matches are in a completely different order from the Silvervision Home Video.

    Mean Gene and Bobby Heenan are your hosts, driving to Coliseum Home Video offices, but alas, they’re lost and Heenan is hopeless at navigating. Once they begin having car troubles, their trip turns from bad to even worse. Heenan is convinced that he can fix the car, but he struggles at even opening the hood.

    Money Inc. © w/Jimmy Hart vs The Nasty Boys - WWE Tag Titles
    From December 1992. This program had been going on ever since The Nasty Boys, much like The Natural Disasters at the start of 1992, realized that Jimmy Hart was always going to favor Money Inc over the other teams he managed. As a result, the Nasties dumped Hart on the Nov 1st edition of Wrestling Challenge, turning face in the process. Unfortunately, this lengthy program is mostly forgotten due to the fact that it was all building up to a Wrestlemania 9 match, but once Hulk Hogan came back into the picture, the Nasty Boys were kicked out of their spot in favor of Hulk Hogan and Brutus Beefcake. I suppose it’s not a huge tragedy since obviously these two teams wouldn’t be capable of having good matches together. This was fine, I guess. Sags played the face-in-peril for ages. IRS actually impressed some with his work, particularly with such a smooth drop toe hold and floating over. The appeal of the match is just the unexpected turn. After Knobbs made the hot tag and began to clean house, Money Inc bailed and went to leave, seemingly relying on being counted out to retain the tag titles. Instead, the referee informed the ring announcer that if Money Inc doesn’t return, they’d be lost the tag titles. Even the commentators doubt the referee’s ability to do this. That would ensure we’d get a proper finish, but surprise surprise, The Nasty Boys may have ditched Jimmy Hart, but we’re still forced to endure the typical Nasty Boys finish. While the referee is busy with Knobbs trying to throttle Hart, DiBiase grabs one of the tag titles and nails Sags after Sags got the cover with his ungraceful elbow drop on IRS. That allows IRS to drape an arm across Sags and get the pinfall. I’ll just focus on the positive and will be happy that Coliseum Home Video gave us a proper finish rather than focusing on the negative. **

    Crush vs Papa Shango
    From October 1992, the same night Bret Hart defeated Ric Flair for the WWE Title. At this point, Kona Crush is still fairly new and seems destined to be pushed really hard, especially come 1993. It seemed to me that the Doink the Clown feud seemed to derail Kona Crush some and it was difficult to see him as this epic figure after he was bested by a clown so many times. Meanwhile, Shango had been in the WWE for a couple of months more, but like Crush in 1993, didn’t really seem to go as far as you’d initially expect. Although he had a really great record on TV, he barely had any important TV matches with all of his important matches just coming at house shows in series of matches against the likes of The Ultimate Warrior and The Undertaker. This match was pretty dull as both men got in a good amount of offense following Shango starting the match by attacking Crush during the latter’s entrance when Crush foolishly turned his back on him. That led into the commentators debating whether or not such actions are fair. In his attempt to prove that playing by the rules can get you far, Sean Mooney brings up Bob Backlund, stating that, “He’s done...well…?” Bud, you don’t even sound too convinced of that, how are you going to convince others? Crush did manage to get in one good looking super kick in the middle of the match. The finish is the highlight of the match as Crush is gaining more and more momentum, sending Shango out of the ring. Shango would retrieve his voodoo stick and would shoot sparks out of it into the face of Crush for the DQ. Sure, it’s a lame non-finish, but it’s something notable! * ½

    The Big Boss Man vs Rick Martel
    From September 1992. At this point, Boss Man had just recently returned to TV after being injured by Nailz in Nailz’ memorable debut. This was a whole lot of nothing. Martel complained of the Boss Man pulling at his hair, even though he now has shortish hair. Boss Man ruffled at Martel’s hair and then worked over the arm without any purpose. The difference between Boss Man in 1991 and 1992 is very apparent to me. It just doesn’t seem like he cares anymore, which is not a good thing when he’s against an unremarkable opponent like Martel. What really annoys me the most about this match is the finish. Realizing that he’s not having much success against the former corrections officer, Martel decides to grab his atomizer. That prompts Boss Man to grab his nightstick and we have a standoff with both men holding their trusty objects. The referee, unable to get either man to drop the weapons instead calls for the bell, DQ’ing both of them. A double disqualification without either guy actually doing anything. And to think, this match was actually taped for Primetime Wrestling. Lame. * ¼

    Back to the side of the road and Bobby Heenan still can’t figure out what the problem is.

    The follow match is copied and paste from an earlier review. More on that after the match.

    The Repo Man vs Earthquake
    From November 1992, the night before Survivor Series. The Repo Man is another wrestler who isn’t booked for Survivor Series and could have easily been a part of an elimination match. Pretty short match here as The Repo Man gets in a surprising amount of offense. Even though we’re two years removed from Quake’s peak in his WWE career, it’s bizarre seeing him being dominated by a random lowcarder like the Repo Man. I do really like the finish, even though I suspect it wasn’t planned. The Repo Man went to climb up to the top rope, but it proves to be a bit awkward for him, so he’s forced to waste a few moments switching sides on the ring post for the far more comfortable way to the top rope. The commentators play this off as The Repo Man forgetting that he’s not ambidextrous. All of this time wasted allowed Quake to recover, forcing Repo Man to dive off of the top rope prematurely, in a sad looking dive that Quake easily catches and slams. One Earthquake Splash later and Quake wins. Both men would be done with the WWE within the next few months. An unremarkable, but inoffensive match. **

    I previously reviewed that match in the Coliseum Home Video, Smack’Em Whack’Em. So not only is Coliseum Home Video double dipping such a random match, they’re double dipping literally two months later! If you only watch Coliseum Home Videos on the WWE Network, this match is on back to back tapes! It makes zero sense especially seeing as Wrestlefest ‘93 clocks in at two hours and nineteen minutes, making it a bit longer than the average CHV. It’s not even comparing two different types of Coliseum Home Videos, as if the one was an hour long tape and the other a normal two hour tape. It’s a silly thing to rant over, especially since it’s a move done twenty-five years ago, but I’m legitimately baffled as to the WWE doing this.

    Shawn Michaels © vs Virgil - WWE IC Title
    From October 1992. This is actually a bit interesting because this is from the night after Shawn won the IC Title from The British Bulldog at SNME 31, but that show wouldn’t air until November 14th (This was taped on October 28th). So for these fans in attendance, they’re the first to learn that Michaels was now a champion in the WWE. Speaking of the match not airing until November 14, the commentators reference Michaels’ failure to beat Bret Hart for the WWE Title at Survivor Series. Much like their MSG match from the start of 1992, this was surprisingly good. It’s pretty one sided with Michaels controlling the majority of the match with super kicks and a nice standing dropkick that gets a #VintageShawnMichaels from Lord Alfred Hayes. Virgil does get in some moves, but I’d say nearly everything he does can be credited as a defensive move to counter some of Michaels’ offense. The finish saw Virgil missing a charging knee in the corner, allowing Michaels to finish him off with the Teardrop Suplex for his first official victory as a champion in the WWE. Good match, but their MSG match is a little better. ** ¾


    The Undertaker w/Paul Bearer vs The Berzerker w/Mr. Fuji
    From June 1992. All of these years later, I’m still not entirely sure if these two had a feud around this time period or not. Without a doubt, my clearest memory of the Berzerker was an angle he did with Taker on TV where he tried to stab the Deadman with his sword. Obviously, The Undertaker moved out of the way, causing ‘Zerker to plunge his sword through the ring. For 1992 WWE, it was a pretty shocking moment. Was that part of a short B program for Taker or was it just the result of a random match? This was more of a fight than a proper match. With Fuji constantly distracting the referee, Berzerker was able to use whatever weapons he could get his hands on. This included a chair, the steel steps, and some cables. Nothing Berzerker could do would have too much affect on Taker though. Even when The Berzerker begins to deliver three piledrivers in a row, Taker no sells the first two and tries to no sell the third. With each piledriver, has more difficulty in getting back up. However, Taker doesn’t remain down for long, preventing Berzerker from using his sword and finishing him off with the Tombstone to get the victory. The match wasn’t much, but I did appreciate it if for no other reason than the sword in the mat being one of the better memories I have from my childhood as a wrestling fan. * ¾

    Back at the side of the road with Mean Gene and The Brain. Heenan not has a spot of oil on his nose. When Mean Gene gets on Heenan to help out, Heenan’s solution is to rip out random parts from under the hood, claiming that, “They just get in the way”.

    Jim Duggan vs IRS
    From July 1991. It wasn’t uncommon for CHV to throw on one match from an entirely different time period from the rest of the tape. While most of this tape is from the second half of 1992, here we have one from the previous summer. At this point, IRS had only been on TV for a couple of months. In fact, since Summerslam 1991 was still a month away, this is the earliest IRS match that was ever released on video. How’s that for a random, and an incredibly worthless, piece of trivia? Speaking of worthless, IRS vs Duggan. Not much happens in the match as IRS kills time with some rest holds. I did enjoy some of Duggan’s offense based around holding IRS’ tie in a spot that didn’t happen nearly enough in IRS’ run with the WWE. The finish is just as lazy as the match as they battled to the outside until the referee counted to ten, counting out both men. Meh. *

    High Energy and Tito Santana vs The Nasty Boys and The Repo Man
    From July 1992. Why is this The Repo Man teaming with The Nasty Boys when The Mountie would have made far more sense? For a Nasty Boys match, this wasn’t bad. Owen played the face-in-peril for the majority of the match. The commentators rarely could be bothered to call the action, instead focusing on Lord Alfred Hayes’ inability to trust and other matters. They ended up missing Owen countering a Pity City and sending Knobbs into Sags’ armpit instead. Once Owen was able to get the hot tag, the match kind of falls apart. Since it’s a Nasty Boys match, they had to have the end of the match spot involving the babyface covering a Nasty Boy, but the referee is distracted, allowing the other Nasty Boy to break up the cover. Rather than using a weapon in that moment, the heels instead vary the tired spot by then bringing in Repo Man’s rope to try and use it, but Santana counters it, sending Repo Man over in a back body drop. At some point, the referee DQs the heels, awarding the match to the faces. I do kinda like the North American trio of Santana, Owen, and Koko together though. ** ¼


    Randy Savage vs Terrific Terry Taylor
    From November 1992. Taylor had only been back on WWE TV for a month at this time. During Savage’s entrance, Gorilla Monsoon and Lord Alfred Hayes praised all of Savage’s work with the Make a Wish Foundation. I know that John Cena holds the record for most wishes granted, but I was curious to look up to possibly find out how many wishes Savage granted. Instead, I found an article from The Onion about how a kid with leukemia wished Savage would just go away after spending half a day with him. ‘"I really only wanted him to give me an autograph and tell me what it was like to fight the Ultimate Warrior," Tyler said. "Not read me bedtime stories and try to feed me."’ God bless The Onion. I still have no idea how many wishes The Macho Man granted. Anyways, this followed the typical Macho Man babyface formula of allowing his opponent to control the match with Savage making the comeback at the very end. I’ve never been a Taylor fan, but he comes across as being so much more natural as a heel than when he was the babyface Red Rooster. Although Taylor did dominate the match, every time he attempted something big, Savage thwarted it. Taylor would go for a big dropkick, but Savage would hold onto the ropes, causing Taylor to crash and burn on the mat. Taylor would attempt a Vader Bomb, but Savage would get his knees up. Savage would predictably finish Taylor off with the flying elbow drop for the victory. It’s likely only because I saw so little of his year as Terrific Terry Taylor, but it’s always a treat seeing Taylor in these matches. An okay match. ** ½

    Back at the side of the road, Bobby Heenan pulls a hamster out from the engine. Holy smokes, could this be the cause for Heenan and Mean Gene’s car troubles?!

    Bret Hart © vs Kamala w/Harvey Wippleman and Kim Chee - WWE IC Title
    From August 1992. Sean Mooney and Lord Alfred Hayes had the gall to talk about how you can watch the best matches on Coliseum Home Video before this match. Earlier in this review, I bitched about Earthquake vs The Repo Man appearing on both Wrestlefest 1993 and Smack’Em Whack’Em Coliseum Home Videos released just two months apart. Hart vs Kamala also appeared on that tape, but that was a different match, which was for the WWE World Title. So technically, Coliseum Home Video is releasing two separate matches for Hart vs Kamala, but still...it’s Kamala vs Bret Hart released on back-to-back tapes. Unlike Smack’Em Whack’Em, you don’t have the benefit of also watching Bret against HBK and The Nature Boy. You know a Bret match is bad when Hart isn’t able to do anything really noteworthy. Kamala dominated the match, mostly thanks to his vice grip on Hart’s pectoral. I get that if your hands are large enough, such a hold could probably be pretty painful, but all it looks like on TV is Kamala squeezing Bret’s boob. Kamala was in a wacky mood, being pretty athletic, even jumping up into the air and touching his toes as if he’s 2011 circa Randy Orton. Since this match was a Coliseum Home Video exclusive, and not filmed for any weekly program, the fact that it was an IC Title match was never brought up. So that was a little awkward. Once Bret started to make his comeback, Kim Chee was quick to jump into the ring to cause the DQ. At least in their Smack’Em Whack’Em match, Bret got a roll-up victory. What a waste of a Bret CHV match. * ¼


    Razor Ramon vs Tito Santana
    From October 1992. I don’t know what got into Santana, but he put on his working boots for his match. It’s only four minutes long and he was clearly there to job, but he was working hard from the start until the finish. The match began with Santana immediately going after Razor, knocking him out of the ring with a flying forearm. El Matador kept up the fast pace, something that wasn’t so common for Tito in the 90s, for the rest of the time, tossing Razor around with arm drags and even making an arm lock interesting. Alas, it Santana still ended up failing after Razor delivered the Razor’s Edge for the victory. One of the better short matches from 1992 WWE. ** ¾


    Mr. Perfect vs Ric Flair - Loser Leaves Town
    From the January 25, 1993 edition of Monday Night Raw. This is the historic first match from Raw to ever be released on physical media. Although I’ve never been as high on this as seemingly every other person who has watched it, I do have to admit that the match felt important. You’re not going to find a more important Raw 1993 match than this one. In an era where loser leave town matches now mean absolutely nothing to the point where you shouldn’t even expect the loser to miss a single episode of Raw, this is different. With his loss here, Flair wouldn’t be seen again on WWE TV until late 2001. The action in the ring is just okay, but color commentator, Bobby Heenan, worked his ass off calling the match. It’s not quite as good or memorable as his calling of the 1992 Royal Rumble match, but it’s pretty close. I don’t know whose idea it was, but whomever decided that Rob Bartlett would say virtually nothing for the entire match made the right call. Instead, we’re able to just focus on this epic struggle between Flair and Perfect with McMahon and Heenan calling the action filled with emotion. On this Home Video, there’s a couple of cuts, which most likely corresponds with when Raw went to commercial break, but since the commentary is slightly edited, we’re not told when a commercial break is actually happening. Are we getting the full match that was shown on Raw or is it slightly edited down some? Since the commentary is edited a bit, I wouldn’t have any idea unless I checked out the Raw episode on the WWE Network. Despite a lot of abuse including being busted open, Mr. Perfect managed to cleanly pin Flair with the Perfect Plex to not only win the match, but to send Flair packing from the WWE for the rest of the 90s. Ultimately, I think the match is just okay, but the emotion and Heenan’s commentary bumps it up into being something better. *** ½

    Finally, we wrap up the tape by heading back to the side of the road. Mean Gene and Heenan have given up all hope of fixing their car and is now trying to flag a car down to hitch a ride. Once a ride does stop, the pair is delighted. Mean Gene rushes off to the car while Heenan gathers all of their stuff. Just as The Brain gets everything in his hands, the car drives off with just Mean Gene.

    Overall
    When you have skit segments with Bobby Heenan, whether with Gorilla Monsoon or Mean Gene, you at least have that to look forward to when watching a Coliseum Home Video as compared to the inconsistent segments with Sean Mooney and Lord Alfred Hayes. Quality wise, up until the final match on the tape, there wasn’t much to enjoy. Matches like Razor/Santana and HBK/Virgil were good for what they were, but they were hardly the sort of matches you’d buy a tape for. At least back in 1993, the reason to get your hands on this tape was for the Loser Leaves Town match. With the exception of the UK home video of Monday Night Raw Prime Cuts, this video was the only way to re-watch the match for over a decade. As I said, I’m not as big of a fan as everyone else, but if you were to put together a list of the most important 1993 matches for the WWE, Perfect/Flair would certainly be on it. However, since the Flair/Perfect match is shown originally on an episode of Raw that is on the WWE Network, I wouldn’t say there’s much of a reason to actually watch Wrestlefest 1993 on the WWE Network.

  2. #2
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    Re: WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

    Thought I watched this tape before but apparently not. I rented a Coliseum Video from around the same period when I was in HS and it had a Flair-Perfect match on there but it wasn't the Loser Leaves Town match. Gonna see if this tape is on the Network.


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    Re: WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

    Quote Originally Posted by LibSuperstar View Post
    Thought I watched this tape before but apparently not. I rented a Coliseum Video from around the same period when I was in HS and it had a Flair-Perfect match on there but it wasn't the Loser Leaves Town match. Gonna see if this tape is on the Network.
    It is on there. And its a good match. I think its invasion of the bodyslammers
    Here fishy fishy fishy.......

  4. #4

    Re: WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

    Yeah, the other Perfect/Flair match was released on the Invasion of the Bodyslammers home video. I had previously reviewed the match in my Royal Rumble 1993 (2013 edition) review as a bonus match review.

    Although the tape does have the Perfect/Flair match and a random Bret vs HBK match, the rest of the tape looks pretty...rough. With such highlights as The Beverly Brothers vs The Nasty Boys, Kamala vs Doink, Papa Shango vs The Undertaker, and Typhoon vs Bam Bam Bigelow, it could be a chore to it through. To make matters worse, the segments between the matches features bowling with Lord Alfred Hayes and Kamala. Good god...

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    Re: WWE Wrestlefest '93 Home Video Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim
    Yeah, the other Perfect/Flair match was released on the Invasion of the Bodyslammers home video. I had previously reviewed the match in my Royal Rumble 1993 (2013 edition) review as a bonus match review.

    Although the tape does have the Perfect/Flair match and a random Bret vs HBK match, the rest of the tape looks pretty...rough. With such highlights as The Beverly Brothers vs The Nasty Boys, Kamala vs Doink, Papa Shango vs The Undertaker, and Typhoon vs Bam Bam Bigelow, it could be a chore to it through. To make matters worse, the segments between the matches features bowling with Lord Alfred Hayes and Kamala. Good god...
    I remember now. Man, that was so cheesy.


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