Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 2101112
Results 221 to 230 of 230

Thread: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

  1. #221
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Tales from the Crypt
    Title: Split Personality
    Season: 4/Episode: 11
    Director: Joel Silver


    Joe Pesci stars as Vic, the schmuck scammer who is always out to make a bit of money, regardless of who he screws in the process. When we’re first introduced to Vic, he comes across as a decent guy, helping out a gambler down on his luck win a lot of money. Vic only further comes across as a good guy when he keeps refusing to accept any payment from the gambler, insistent that the guy keeps his money. Vic’s true colors are revealed after he plays a long game con on the gambler and we’re even shown that all of it, including the gambler’s struggles at the game’s table, was part of the con. Vic’s a real piece of shit.

    Besides loving the art of the con, the other thing Vic loves most of all is the fantasy of being able to bang a pair of twin sisters. Through pure happenstance, Vic’s two great loves end up meeting head to head as Vic is in a small car accident and when he goes to the nearest house to call for some help, he learns that the house is owned by a pair of twin sisters, both of whom are completely loaded from the inheritance of their famous architect father. Vic puts on a bit of charm to get close to the sisters and then takes it one step further by introducing them to his twin brother - Jack. Thanks to a hairpiece that allows Vic/Jack to fool the sisters into believing that they’re each dating a brother, Vic/Jack has seemingly attained everything he could want in life. The dual marriages allow Vic/Jack to bang a pair of sisters and to live off of their money. What could possibly go wrong for Vic?

    This episode is a classic morality tale for Tales from the Crypt. Vic is a total scumbag, who doesn’t seem to have any sort of moral compass. Early on in the episode, he even bragged about scamming the elderly to his hooker. The more everything seems to come together for Vic, the greater the anticipation for it to all go sour. Pesci deserves the majority of the praise for this episode. He pulls off the character so perfectly. Vic is a lowlife, but Pesci plays him as such an entertaining person that even when he’s doing something awful, you can’t help but to just shake your head and chuckle to yourself.

    The big twist at the end of the episode is actually better than what it initially seemed like it would be. Obviously, the twin sisters would end up learning the truth about Vic and punish him accordingly, but what wasn’t expected was for the twin sisters to be revealed as being behind their father’s death. So not only do they have a reason to be upset with Vic, it’s now established that they’re a bit mentally unhinged. The end result wasn’t just the sisters punishing Vic, but rather pulling out a chainsaw to cut Vic in half, allowing both twins to keep their half of Vic/Jack in their beds for as long as they wish. The final image of Vic/Jack cut perfectly in half and a bloody mess while the twins are completely unfazed by being in bed with a half corpse is pretty unsettling.

    If there is one flaw of the episode, it’s that there’s so little time with Vic/Jack that they never bothered explaining how the twin sisters were fooled in the first place. Had they just introduced “Jack” prior to Vic taking the girls out, there would have been some opportunities to explain how they twins didn’t realize the truth. Admittedly, part of the fun of Vic’s con is that it’s such an awful con. The fact that he only managed to “Remember” about his own twin brother after hanging out with the twins on several occasions makes Vic out to be an even more lovable asshole. If you’re a fan of Joe Pesci, go out of your way to watch this episode.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, the world's most famous vampire actor returns to Fright Fest ready to kill again.

  2. #222
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Day #22
    Title: Mark of the Vampire
    Country: United States
    Year: 1935
    Director: Tod Browning




    After a man's death, everyone in the village believes two new residents, who look like vampires, are behind the murder. Is the murder vampire-based or is the one inspector who refuses to believe in the occult right in his beliefs?


    Quite possibly the most legendary lost horror film ever made was 1927’s London After Midnight. This Lon Chaney Sr. film is apparently so cared about and sought after that there’s even been attempts to reconstruct the film with just still photos. Chaney’s character of Prof. Burke may be a character that very few people, if any, still alive today have seen fully in a movie, but he still lives on in inspiring future horror figures. One such figure that was influenced by Chaney in London After Midnight was the title character in the Babadook film from a few years ago. With each year that passes since the creation of London After Midnight, it’s becoming less and less likely that a copy of the film will ever be found hidden in someone’s attic or storage unit. A real shame too that horror fans are not able to experience a horror classic starring the most legendary silent era horror star and directed by Tod Browning, one of the bigger names in horror filmmaking in those early days of filmmaking.

    The real irony in all of this is that despite the fact that it’s been since 1967, when the last known print of London After Midnight was destroyed, it’s almost as if Browning could see into the future and knew that his film would become lost. A mere eight years after London After Midnight was made, so it’s still not a lost film, Browning set out to remake the film, this time using this new fancy development known as sound. Even without knowing the backstory with London After Midnight, there’s a lot of intrigue when you first hear about 1935’s Mark of the Vampire. As I already said, it’s directed by Tod Browning. He’s the man who helped usher horror into the talking era with his Universal Picture, Dracula. Joining him is Dracula himself, Bela Lugosi, playing Count Mora, who you could argue is exactly like Count Dracula. Also along for the ride is Lionel Atwill, who despite not having much of a name for himself just yet, he’d end up becoming one of the more recurring stars of the Universal Monster films until his death a decade later. So even without knowing anything else about the film, I was pumped to see this non-Universal Monster film from the very peak of the Universal Monsters era.

    Initially, things do go pretty well. We’re introduced to a plot that comes across as being different from the typical vampire tale. Instead of retelling Dracula, there’s a far greater emphasis on the mystery of the death of Sir Karell Borotyn and whether or not the suspected vampires of Count Mora and Luna is behind the deaths. Nearly everyone in the entire village buys into the idea that vampires not only exist, but you’re always at risk of being killed by them. Naturally, once Borotyn is found dead with two bite-like marks on his neck, they believe he must be a victim of Mora. The only one that is entirely dismissive of such a notion from the beginning is Atwill’s character of Inspector Neumann. It creates a fun dynamic of Neumann suspecting everyone and everyone being generally confused when Neumann confronts them. The longer the film goes on, the more I’m interested in the question of whether or not Mora and Luna are actually vampires or if they’re just goth killers.

    While Lugosi does his best to just portray Dracula again, with the only differences being that there’s a wound on the side of his head and he remains silent, it’s his daughter, Luna, that nearly steals the show. The character of Luna has a great look to her, with being slightly seductive while being creepy in her silence. Luna is clearly not just one of Dracula’s random brides that were ultimately forgettable in this time period. Also creepy is the general atmosphere and sets. It’s certainly cheap looking, but there’s a plethora of cobwebs, bats flying around, and fog. The mood of the film is on point.

    My interest in the film does begin to wane as I become frustrated with how little Neumann, Mora, and Luna are actually in the film. Up until the very last scene, we don’t even get to hear any lines from Mora, which seems like a waste of Bela Lugosi. The big reveal at the end of the film only further caused me to not care. It turns out that not only did Borotyn get killed by his friend, Baron Otto, but Mora and Luna aren’t even vampires, they’re just actors! It becomes this great big complicated mess as it’s revealed that various characters began to suspect Otto of the killing, so an elaborate plan was created to trick him into being hypnotized and showing how he made Borotyn’s death look as if it was caused by a vampire. When we do finally get to hear Mora and Luna speak, they’re laughing about another successful acting gig, convincing Otto that they had really been vampires. Truthfully, this final act is so all over the place that I’m not entirely sure if I understood everything that was happening. If there is any legitimate confusion, I can’t say the end result has made me want to go back and re-watch Mark of the Vampire to get a better grasp on what happened. There’s even the frustration over not knowing if this should be considered a serious horror or merely a parody.

    Overall, I had high hopes going into Mark of the Vampire and while the film initially did deliver, it tried too hard to have a complicated twist ending that left me not interested in the movie altogether. I can’t say it was bad enough to actively avoid, but I’d recommend anyone interested in watching this to go in with the understanding that all of the great potential set-up at the beginning of the film is ruined thanks to the ending. Still, Count Mora and Luna excelled for the limited time they had on the screen though.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, it's Christmas time again in Fright Fest, time to grab your Santa Claus suit, the holiday music, and that special someone you've been obsessing over.

  3. #223
    Crotchety Old SMOD

    Fuji Vice's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Wing Kong Exchange
    Posts
    24,756
    Rep Power
    377825
      Country                    Canada

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    In regards to Split Personality, the first thing I noticed about it is the ridiculous cast at the beginning. You’ve got Joe Pantoliano (The Matrix, Memento), Burt Young (Uncle Paulie from Rocky) and Joe Pesci all in the same scene. They could have made an entire episode with just the three of them talking and it would have been one of the best of the series. Even more amazing is the fact that Pesci, an Oscar winner at this point, was willing to work on a television show, something that just wasn’t the norm back in this time period.

    There’s also a lot of talent on the other side of the camera here. The director is Joel Silver, most known for producing a slew of Hollywood hits like Die Hard, The Matrix, the Lethal Weapon series and Predator among many others. It’s written by Fred Dekker who also wrote both House films, Night of the Creeps and The Monster Squad and it was photographed by Jan de Bont, who would go on to a lot of success as a director with films like Speed and Twister. That’s pretty fucking impressive if you sit back and think about it for a minute.

    Amazingly, I found that even with all this talent, the episode itself was pretty pedestrian and would have most likely been terrible if Pesci hadn’t been cast as the lead. Like Billy Zane in Demon Knight, you could tell he was having a ton of fun with the role and really made the most out of it. Unfortunately, outside of his performance, I didn’t really care for much else here. The actresses playing the twins, while good looking, were awful and the ending was telegraphed with the shot of the chainsaw while Pesci was in the swimming pool. I suppose I just expected more from Dekker given his previous works but that seems like foreshadowing a grade 4 student could come up with.

    Then again, he did come up with one of the Crypt Keeper’s best lines with “heads I win, tails you ooze” so I suppose I can forgive him for the rest of the script.


    Ask Fuji|2017 Movie Log

    Help decide WC's Fave Five Horror Movie Heroes~!

    ​​​



    Quote Originally Posted by Swamps
    Get out and kick their ass! Even if its Grandma!







  4. #224
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    Then again, he did come up with one of the Crypt Keeper’s best lines with “heads I win, tails you ooze” so I suppose I can forgive him for the rest of the script.
    My favorite Cryptkeeper line comes from season 3's Loved to Death.

    “Women. You can’t live with them, but you can’t cut them up into tiny pieces and tell the neighbors she’s in Palm Springs either.”


  5. #225
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Day #23
    Title: P2
    Country: United States
    Year: 2007
    Director: Franck Khalfoun




    It's Christmas Eve and for Angela, all she wants to do is to get out of work to spend the holidays with her family, unbeknownst to her, there's one man in the building that is set on a private party with just the two of them...


    Although released a decade ago, in fact in three weeks will be the 10th anniversary, I feel P2 is even more relevant today than it was in 2007. Thanks to social media only increasing and everyone having a far greater online presence, it’s easier to become aware of white knights and “Neckbeards” that literally think that all women are awful people who are only interested in jerks and not swell guys like themselves. Naturally, that causes the neckbeard to throw a tantrum and verbally berate all women, poking some serious holes into the claim that they’re so nice. Essentially, this is the exact sort of person that the antagonist, Thomas, has become. He’s so deluded that he actually thinks there’s some sort of relationship between himself and Angela, despite their limited previous interactions and has such rage for anyone he believes has harmed Angela, completely missing the fact that he’s harming her far worse than anyone has before. It’s Thomas’ obsession with Angela and staunch belief that he’s in the right that makes him such a terrifying character. These sort of mentally disturbed people are not that of fiction, but they exist in reality, meaning one day you may encounter your own Thomas.

    While watching the film, it wasn’t difficult to realize that P2 came out at the height of the torture porn fad. The plot itself of a woman stuck in a parking garage, trying to avoid her captor comes across as more of a thriller than an actual horror. Yet, it’s the gore, albeit spaced out nicely, that grounds the film back into the realm of horror. Any time there’s an act of violence, it’s far more intense than even I expected, despite seeing the movie once shortly after it originally came out. The death of the dog alone was so brutal and lasted far longer than maybe I would have been comfortable seeing. It definitely keeps you watching, always curious what P2 will do next with the gore. Although P2 did make a very small profit on its meager 3.5 million dollar budget, I’m wondering if all of the gore ended up being a mistake. Decrease the violence and I’d have to assume that P2 would easily be able to earn itself a PG-13 rating, potentially resulting in far more people going to see it.

    Generally speaking, I’m a fan of one location based horror movies. Although the title, P2, is slightly misleading, seeing as the events of the movie takes place all throughout the parking garage, not just on the second level, they managed to keep things interesting despite the limited amount of locations they could visit. Wes Bentley (Thomas) deserves a good deal of praise for this. He nails the part and manages to switch up the character to be more creepy, fun loving, or pathetic. Where he particularly excels is when I don’t find myself caring for him or feeling bad for Thomas when he has his pathetic moments of admitting how lonely he is or after he finds his dog dead. I certainly feel bad about the dog dying, but Thomas is such a twisted individual that those feelings of sympathy for the dog does not carry over onto Thomas himself.

    Rachel Nichols as Angela was likable enough. She could have used a little more depth to her character. Writing wise, all she had going for herself was being a victim. Whether it’s all Thomas does to her or the sexual harassment from a coworker, we’re supposed to feel for the character solely because she’s having such a tough time. Rather than the sexual harassment or being held captive, what actually hit me on an emotional level for Angela was when Angela is forced to call her family by Thomas, lying to them to explain why she wouldn’t show up. The viewers know what Angela is going through, but her family obviously doesn’t. So to Angela’s family, she’s just flaking out on them, something that may have been a regular thing for her. Hearing her brother-in-law in the background of the call calling her out for lying made me feel really bad for Angela. Imagine if Angela had died in the film, knowing she’s dying with the knowledge of her family’s last thoughts about her was that she was uncaring, when she absolutely meant to show up to the Christmas party. Since there wasn’t much depth to the character, the filmmakers seemed to purpose dress Angela in a very low cut dress, seemingly with the idea that massive cleavage = viewers will care about her.

    For a movie that didn’t need to be set in the Christmas season, the movie did do their best to constantly remind you that it’s a Christmas movie. God bless Thomas, constantly blaring Christmas-based music and even wearing a Santa Claus costume for Angela to see when she first wakes up after being knocked out. Considering the fact that Thomas then immediately removed the costume, it served no other purpose than to simply dress up for the sake of dressing up. Thomas may be a sick individual, but he has the Christmas spirit! In addition to what Thomas does, there’s also plenty of Christmas decorations in the actual office building and an office Christmas party is what seemingly starts the film. My one slight complaint about the Christmas feel is the lack of snow. I assume the reason why there wasn’t any snow, despite being set in New York (And filmed in Toronto), is because it was filmed when it wasn’t winter.

    Overall, I enjoyed P2 when it first came out and I feel it still holds up well. The tension is high at various points and Wes Bentley nails the creep factor necessary for his character. The lack of depth for Rebecca and the fact that there’s been some truly great captive/kidnapping horror movies (Inside, Misery, or even the recent Don’t Breathe) that just did everything better than P2, keeps P2 from reaching its full potential. P2 is well worth the watch if you’re looking for some Christmas based horror though.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, this "Creepy" movie, that had been requested multiple times in 2016 and 2017, finally gets covered in Fright Fest.

  6. #226
    Crotchety Old SMOD

    Fuji Vice's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Wing Kong Exchange
    Posts
    24,756
    Rep Power
    377825
      Country                    Canada

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    I've never gotten around to P2 but I did enjoy Khalfoun's take on Maniac so I'm going to try and catch it in the next couple of days. I've got to say, "a new level of terror" is an excellent tagline.

    Also, I'm going to attempt to steal a cheap rep and say tomorrow's review is Creep.


    Ask Fuji|2017 Movie Log

    Help decide WC's Fave Five Horror Movie Heroes~!

    ​​​



    Quote Originally Posted by Swamps
    Get out and kick their ass! Even if its Grandma!







  7. #227
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    I've never gotten around to P2 but I did enjoy Khalfoun's take on Maniac so I'm going to try and catch it in the next couple of days. I've got to say, "a new level of terror" is an excellent tagline.
    But you're Fuji. You've watched like...everything.

  8. #228
    Crotchety Old SMOD

    Fuji Vice's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Wing Kong Exchange
    Posts
    24,756
    Rep Power
    377825
      Country                    Canada

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    But you're Fuji. You've watched like...everything.
    Tbh I kind of forgot P2 existed but I must have wanted to watch it at some point since it’s on one of my hard drives.


    Ask Fuji|2017 Movie Log

    Help decide WC's Fave Five Horror Movie Heroes~!

    ​​​



    Quote Originally Posted by Swamps
    Get out and kick their ass! Even if its Grandma!







  9. #229
    Jim's Avatar

    Status
    Online
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    43,656
    Rep Power
    221185
      Country                    United States

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    Day #24
    Title: Creep
    Country: United Kingdom
    Year: 2004
    Director: Christopher Smith




    After falling asleep and missing her subway, Kate must spend the night in the locked up subway station, unaware that she isn’t alone…


    As someone who has never lived in a big city, I’ve never been on a subway in my entire life. I’ve been on trains, planes, and buses, but not subways. While watching Creep, I began to wonder if my lack of first hand experience with subways may take away some of the scare factor of the movie. When the movie relies on horror in the environment that so many are used to being in and having to rely on, I do wonder if perhaps the film is creepier if the viewer is then forced to ride the subway at some point in the aftermath of finishing the film. I’m a fan of any sort of horror where the scares take place in a location that you’re supposed to be comfortable in, or as comfortable as you can feel on public transport, and I find it to be an effective form to add extra creepiness to any plot.

    The characters in the film are kind of interesting to me. You’ve got the two well to do career business people in the lead character of Kate and her co-worker Guy. Neither person is actually likable. To put it blunt, Kate has a tendency to be pretty bitchy to people and at no time in the film is this ever resolved. It’s a weird trait to give your main character when you don’t intend to noticeably change her personality. If Kate is just a little bitchy, Guy is a total scumbag, assaulting Kate in her time of need and had the creature not attacked him when it did, Guy would have raped her. On the other end of the spectrum are the three characters that are either blue collar (Sanitation worker, George) or homeless drug addicts that live in a secret area of the subway station (Mandy and Jimmy). In both cases, these characters are far nicer, willing to put themselves out there to help others, and even die in hopes of helping someone. Even someone like Mandy, who was too drugged out to do much when the horror kicked in, had a nice moment of sorts when she offered to sell Kate her subway pass in order to allow Kate to get on the subway in time. Not that that really mattered though as that silly bint ended up falling asleep while waiting for the subway, causing her to be left alone (or is she?!) in the subway. That seems to be a pretty clear message that regardless of your spot in society, being a good person and a true asset to society is not dependant on your social standing.

    I loved the handling of the creature. In the first half of the movie, the filmmakers actively avoid showing the creature. At most, all you see is just a hand. The first time the creature is fully shown is brilliant. As the lights flicker in and out, Kate is scared and alone. The lights go out and once they come back on, the creature’s face is taking up the entire television screen. It’s a great jump scare without having to rely on music to get the job done. From that point on, the creature is shown in all of its gross beauty. Besides just looking dirty, the creature has many open sores, seems to be a bit mutated causing it to hunch, and most importantly, has a very unsettling sort of scream about it that it lets out whenever it’s harmed. The creature design is simple, but effective, made better by the fact that it was all practical design without CGI.

    The scene that stands out the most is the surgery room scene. There’s a lot that went into this in order to make it so effective. For starters, enroute to their attempted escape, Kate and George pass through the room to find a dead looking Mandy strapped to a table, looking as if she’s already been experimented on. Due to the nerves George felt and the way Mandy looked, he was too quick to assume that she was dead, causing himself and Kate to leave the room just as Mandy summons enough strength to weakly call out for help. Instead of help, the creature arrived. The creature imitates what he’s personally seen a surgeon do while prepping for surgery. The creature washes his hands (No water being used), puts on gloves (Incredibly dirty ones), puts on a jacket, and finally administering the anesthesia (It’s not connected to anything). Bless that creature’s gross soul, he’s trying so hard! It’s even almost adorable when the creature knows to blow into the gloves when you’re having problems putting them on. Right before he begins to hack Mandy up, he begs the creature for her life, which has so much meaning later on when the creature copies it in order to try and trick Kate into not killing him. That scene later on is fantastic as Kate is having some genuine emotion, finally seeing this creature as a person, only to then realize that this sinister creature is practically mocking her, using the final words of a victim to use against Kate. This movie has some legitimately great moments.

    There is a lot of vagueness that will be frustrating for some. The creature’s backstory isn’t flat out explained, but the film does present plenty of clues to allow the viewer to try and piece together what all has happened to the creature. The best I can come up with is that a surgeon once ran an abortion clinic in a hidden area of the subway, but rather than actually kill some of the fetuses, he managed to keep some of them alive, including the creature, whose name is apparently Craig. What a let down. This bad ass creature is named Craig. CRAIG! At some point, the surgeon died and only Craig was left alone to roam the subway system, kidnapping, killing, and eating those who make the grave mistake of being alone in the subway.

    Overall, Creep is a low budget horror that at one point was receiving a decent amount of attention. It seems as if the success of the Mark Duplass film, Creep, took away a lot of the attention that this film had going for itself. Kate not being the most likable causes her to be a difficult main character to root for. When the film does something right, such as the surgery scene, it does it incredibly well. Creep is a rather bloody film that I feel deserves a bit more attention than it receives. I’d recommend it to those who enjoyed The Descent and are looking for something a bit similar, albeit lesser quality.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:

    Spoiler:


    ---

    Coming up next, Jim stops being a troll and actually covers the Creep that posters have been requesting.

  10. #230
    The Bastard of Bolton
    Shade's Avatar

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Winterfell
    Posts
    3,261
    Rep Power
    24916

    Re: Fright Fest 9: Never to be Certified Fresh

    If i remember correctly. I requested this Creep film once previously for a Fright Fest so I'm glad to see it get a look even if it was a troll haha. I remember watching this as a kid and it freaking me out especially as where I lived was close to a subway station. Definitely worth a look. Agreed that Kate is a bitch. Also haven't seen it but reading your review P2 sounds great. Going to need to check it out.





Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 3 users browsing this thread. (1 members and 2 guests)

  1. ShinobiMusashi

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •