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Thread: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

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    Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    The Amazing Spider-Man is the main comic book line for one of the most popular superhero out there, Peter Parker aka Spider-Man. Started in 1963, it was renumbered in 1999, then renumbered in 2014 and relaunched a 4th time in 2015. My first serious venture into comic books was pretty much reading all of Ultimate Spider-Man so now I'll be doing the same with the actual main canon line of Spider-Man.

    If you're familiar with comics at all, you'll be well aware that they're a clusterfuck of continuity. Also, there's a fuckton of events and spin-offs. Fortunately I've found a great reading order: http://www.comicsbackissues.com/comi...er-chronology/ so I'll be using this to guide me. It goes up to about the 2014 relaunch so I won't have to worry about finding my way around until then. If I can't find one of the ones on that list, I'll have to skip it.

    Odds are this thread gets abandoned but on the other hand, I've got a lot of classes I half-pay attention to so why not read some comics while I'm there. They won't be crazy detailed and they'll be a mix of summary & commentary.

    Index
    Amazing Fantasy #15 - 1962 - Silver Age (Part One & Part Two) - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Fantasy #16 - 1995 - Modern Age - Kurt Busiek & Paul Lee
    Amazing Fantasy #17 - 1995 - Modern Age - Kurt Busiek & Paul Lee
    Amazing Fantasy #18 - 1995 - Modern Age - Kurt Busiek & Paul Lee
    Amazing Spider-Man #1 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Spider-Man #2 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Spider-Man #3 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Spider-Man #4 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Spider-Man #5 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    Amazing Spider-Man #6 - 1963 - Silver Age - Stan Lee & Steve Ditko
    The Untold Tales of Spider-Man #1 - 1995 - Modern Age - Kurt Busiek & Patrick Olliffe
    The Untold Tales of Spider-Man #2 - 1995 - Modern Age - Kurt Busiek & Patrick Olliffe

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    See, I knew Timothy Thatcher would be too boring for you to keep up with

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Jon give me your Marvel Unlimited password plz n thnx





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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed View Post
    See, I knew Timothy Thatcher would be too boring for you to keep up with
    Beat me too it.

    Jon's probably done with indy wrestling all together thanks to Thatcher.
    Last edited by Tennessee Nicky; 03-14-2017 at 01:16 PM.
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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Thatcher is totally coming but this is something I can do mid-class whereas I'm working on some assignments outside of it as it is. Once I get through this surge of coursework, I'll be dropping more rasslin' reviews, especially the GOAT Thatcher.

    ---

    Before we begin, a little intro. Amazing Fantasy is where Spider-Man actually makes his first appearance. First called Amazing Adventures in 1961, then renamed at issue #7 to Amazing Adult Fantasy (I was afraid to google this) then finally called Amazing Fantasy as of issue #15 with the arrival of Spidey. During its Amazing Adventures series, it mostly featured monsters and also starred Marvel’s first silver age comic book hero, Doctor Droom (not to be confused with Doctor Doom, in fact he was renamed to Doctor Druid to avoid that confusion when he popped back up in the 70s) a supernatural monster hunter. They were written by Stan Lee, and drawn by Jack Kirby, Don Heck and Steve Ditko. I can’t find much on Amazing Adult Fantasy so let us segway into Amazing Fantasy #15.

    With the Amazing line set to die, Stan Lee went ahead and created a teenage superhero with everyman problems that wasn’t a sidekick. Turns out, people loved it. The rest is history.



    Amazing Fantasy #15 Part One:

    Peter Park is a classic nerd. He’s a bookworm, called a ‘professional wallflower’, a loner, and obsessed with science. We get glimpses at his Uncle Ben and Aunt May who love Peter Parker above all else (Aunt May in particularly has nothing else going on in her life aside from Peter). Before there was MJ or Gwen Stacy there was Sally who rejects Peter Parker because of school hunk, Flash Thompson. He gets a bonus rejection trying to get his classmates to go to a science exhibit with him. To be fair, most would probably pass on that.



    Peter looking like Rick from Degrassi promises a vaguely threatening vengeance on his classmates. The gist of his getting his powers mostly the same as the movies and cartoon interpretations: he goes to a science exhibit on radio-activity, a spider who absorbed a fuck ton of radioactivity bites Peter while he's watching the exhibit. There doesn't seem to be foul play as with later interpretations just yet. After all, no Oscorp or anything of that sort yet. It's written mostly as if it was chance that the spider got radioactive and it wasn't an escaped spider from an exhibit or that type of stuff. He rushes out of the science hall, and through sheer chance discovers most of his abilities. Jumps out the way of a car about to hit him onto a building, realizes he can climb while sticking to a wall, trying to grab a hold of something to get on the roof, he crushes a pipe. Wanting to test his powers, he enters a 3 minute challenge against wrestler Crusher Hogan.



    Not yet in a Spidey gear though and henceforth named the Masked Marvel (I say henceforth but he calls himself Spider-Man real quick because that's the first name that pops up in five seconds of thinking about it). He manhandles and lifts Crusher Hogan up the eternally long ringpost until Crusher surrenders. After getting a 100$ pay day (that would be about 800$ today) he gets a verbal deal for future matches. Part one ends with Peter creating his web-shooters and his costume (complete with armpit webbing).

    This is the tried and true origin story of Spider-Man, and I’m suspecting we get Uncle Ben’s death in part two to complete the origin story cliche checklist. Contrary to movie interpretations though, we aren’t treated to a montage of bad costumes, Peter gets it right the first time.

    Character Introductions: Flash Thompson, Uncle Ben, Aunt May and of course Peter Parker.

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    Amazing Fantasy #15 Part Two

    Amazing Fantasy #15 Part Two:

    Peter Parker, following up his victory over Crusher Hogan, cashes in on the fame and fortune. He films some commercials, chases away men in suits trying to make a buck out of him and… let’s a burglar escape him. The thief, chased by a cop, runs by him and he lets him go. This is a decent difference from the usual depiction where Peter Parker has some sort of recent motivation for it (he gets underpaid, for example or short changed by the cashier in ASM). Parker tells the cop he’s through getting pushed around and is only looking out for himself.


    After Ben & May get him a microscope, he rectifies that with he’ll take care of them because they’re the only ones who’ve ever cared about him. He doesn’t get an opportunity to do that though, some time later, Peter Parker goes home to find out his uncle was killed. This comes pretty suddenly and off-screen, literally a page after he promises to take care of them. The cop decides to tell Peter Parker where the burglar is holed up and that they’ve got him cornered on the other side of town. Peter goes upstairs to get dressed (though considering he’s coming home from a Spider-Man commercial appearance, you would think he’d already be wearing the suit).


    Peter discovers the burglar, after knocking him out, is actually the man he let go. To sidetrack, Tobey Maguire Parker actually kills the burglar, where as Andrew Garfield never manages to find him. The cartoon versions of Spider-Man prove closer to this interpretation as he hangs him down from webs and lets the cops capture him.


    After mourning, Spidey walks down the street as we get our first glimpse at the iconic quote. Another pretty significant difference is how much of a non-factor Uncle Ben is as a mentor to Peter Parker versus the movie interpretations of him. He’s much more of a guiding light for Peter in the movies, and there’s a lot of emphasis put in his relationship with Peter before they kill him off. He’s shown to be a loving person in his very brief appearances here but like Aunt May, we’re never really made to care about him beyond being one of the only two nice people to Peter. Also, no Peter embarrassing Flash Thompson in this one.

    It also ends on a sort of very open-ended note. There’s no real redemption. We don’t really know if he’ll become a super hero, we don’t know if he’ll move on from his celebrity business, if it’ll change his life as Peter Parker, etc. He just walks away after figuring out it was all his fault.

    Character Introductions: Burglar

    Next Up: Typically this would be Amazing Spider-Man #1 which pops up in 1963 but seeing as we're following that order I linked in the opening post, we'll be time skipping to 1995 for some modern day Spidey with Amazing Fantasy #16.



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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Shit man this is a heck of a ride. The first several years of Spidey are very dated now, not to mention good God there's over 700 issues of this stuff to read. I did it once before and it's quite an undertaking.

    You have my support even though you'll quit before issue 20.

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Quote Originally Posted by Silk View Post
    Shit man this is a heck of a ride. The first several years of Spidey are very dated now, not to mention good God there's over 700 issues of this stuff to read. I did it once before and it's quite an undertaking.

    You have my support even though you'll quit before issue 20.

    Tap Tap Tap
    What do I get if I make it past 20?

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    You know I'm in this for the long haul, always been a fan of Spider-Man in the Comics. Amazing Fantasy is such a classic, personally I own a T-Shirt based off that cover just love it. Can't wait to hear your thoughts when we get to Venom and Carnage or even the Green Goblin when they showed up in the Comics.
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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Legend View Post
    What do I get if I make it past 20?
    Forgiveness.

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Just get to the first appearance of The Sandman so I can get your thoughts on the ingenious way he defeats him.


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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    What I like about this is the longer this lasts (I have faith in you Jon) the more I learn about the Spider-Man mythos without actually having to go out of my way to find these books and reading the subpar versions myself.

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Amazing Fantasy #15 was a success for Marvel but it took a few months for them to start up the Amazing Spider-Man series this thread will focus on. Amazing Fantasy #16 didn’t come until a few decades later in 1995 (the great year yours truly was born in) as a means of showing what happens between Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1.

    Amazing Fantasy #16

    Amazing Fantasy #16 is one long introspection on the part of Peter Parker of figuring out how he can properly live up to the powers his responsibility gives him. There’s a ton of namedrops and visuals for the Fantastic Four, Thor, Hulk, mutants, and a few others, essentially pointing out how this is just about when all the big name heroes were having their coming out party.

    There’s a pretty pointless subplot where Spider-Man’s agent from Amazing Fantasy #15 is trying to get ahold of him so he can keep profiting but without Peter’s real identity, he’s out of luck in find him. It goes nowhere and he only finds Spider-Man at the very end but realizes he won’t be able to rope him back into becoming a celebrity.



    Like #15, we get a momentary glimpse of his school life. As he ponders finding someone to confide in, Liz Allen pops up for her chronological debut to sympathize with Peter about his uncle’s death. Unfortunately, she’s swept away by a few other students, namely Sally, and Peter realizes he has no one he could possibly confide in. Also in here is the start of Flash’s idolatry of Spider-Man when he wonders out loud where the missing webhead is after Spidey’s agent put out a classified ad looking for him, little does he know, Spider-Man’s picking up the books Flash just smacked out of his hands right behind him.

    The villain of the week for AF #16 is Conrad “The Undertaker” Eisenstadt. He runs a murder-for-hire business among other things but what draws the attention of Peter is a scam on widows/widowers. One of his agents, Val, pretends to have had furniture Uncle Ben bought but was only partially paid. He offers to null the contract and keep the ‘down payment’ if they can’t afford to pay it but they insist they’ll find a way to pay to honor Ben’s last gift (alas, they have no more money after Ben’s funeral).

    Peter finally decides to put his mask on for the first time since catching the thief who killed Uncle Ben and somehow finds himself at another one of Val’s victims, discovering that he’s a fraud. He follows him to a warehouse where the whole operation is being held. While dealing with Conrad’s thugs, Peter figures out his Spider-Senses and also lets loose his mocking tongue-lashing for the first time.


    After calling the cops on Conrad and stopping some common thieves, he returns home to talk to Aunt May about Uncle Ben.

    Meanwhile, the issue ends with the tease of a telepath emerging in Manhattan.


    This is a decent entry into the Spider-Man lore though without reading ASM #1, I’m not sure how much of it is necessary. The way Peter Parker’s spider-senses and talkative vigilante persona exploded here felt shoe-horned in about a page. Still, I did enjoy the tease at a growing super world, as well as Flash’s obsession with Spider-Man, and Liz's relationship with Peter. I wonder how many more appearances Sally will make too. The Undertaker felt pretty suave as a villain but was clearly outmatched by Peter and dealt with quickly, I don’t actually recall ever seeing him before so we’ll see if he pops up again down the line. In a way, the villain 'of the week' for this one felt more a means of demonstrating how Peter explored his powers (proportional strength to a spider, using his webbing offensively, spider-senses) and less to give his villains any shine or actually issue him any sort of challenge.

    Character Introductions (appearances only): Liz, Human Torch, Hulk, The Undertaker.


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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Amazing Fantasy #17: In #16, Peter Parker fully took on the mantle of Spider-Man, realizing what he needed to do to live up to the responsibility of his powers after his mishap caused the death of Uncle Ben. After saving a construction worker from a tragic fall, Peter meets another super in Joey Pulaski, a flying psychic. Having only recently lost his long time friends in Sally, Liz, among others as they transitioned into high school thanks to the machinations of Flash Thompson, Peter’s pretty desperate for a friend. Oh, and Aunt May telling Peter he’s far too serious all the time and that she misses him running around the house with his friends doesn’t help.


    Peter decides to enlist the help of Joey to deal with the sabotaged building but all it does is send Joey on a rampage, forcing Peter to save the numerous casualties of her tantrum. Joey reveals that it was her sabotaging the construction, and reinforces Aunt May’s idea that Peter is all too serious. Peter starts to question why he’s taken the mantle of Spider-Man, and ponders on whether or not he’s doing it for the guilt and even wonders if he’s done enough to atone for the death of Uncle Ben. Though he may say that, it’s obvious enough that while he’s far too serious as Peter, Spider-Man is his release, and if he had atoned for it, he still would keep keeping on as he is under the mask because he doesn’t find near as much joy in his civilian life.


    Peter decides to go ‘looking for trouble’ and finds out that things are coming to a head at the construction site. Whoever is paying Joey to sabotage the place wants to seal the deal. Spider-Man arrives just in time to stop Joey & co from threatening their way into controlling the construction company. In a pretty underwhelming fight, Peter is able to dispatch Joey but her employers escape arrest. Peter, still seeing Joey as a friend, tries to sympathize with her but Joey wants nothing to do with him, ending the sole friendly relationship Peter had.


    Underlying here is Peter’s old agent still trying to get him back under contract as he struggles with his own finances. Just as things look to be going as south as they can for him, a roided out Spider-Man/Collosus hybrid meets him. We also get a first glimpse of our favorite mob boss, Kingpin. The Kingpin is unveiled to be the man trying to get his hands on the construction company and though not wholly angered by Spider-Man’s actions, he keeps a lingering eye on him.

    The big fight of the issue is incredibly underwhelming and over in about three panels. Whatever hesitation Peter might have about fighting his friend is present but not in any way to hinder him. Joey’s psionic abilities aren’t made to be a problem or even anything to be concerned about for Spidey who just dodges them and punches her lights out.

    First Appearances: Joey Pulaski, the Collosus/Spider-Man guy, Kingpin

    Up Next: One more Amazing Fantasy before we read our first ever Amazing Spider-Man back in 1963.

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Amazing Fantasy #18
    By Kurt Busiek (Writer) and Paul Lee (Painter)
    1995 - Modern Age

    Womp. Womp. I’m alive again.

    This time on Amazing Fantasy #18, Peter Parker struggles with financial issues and Spider-Man suffers from impostor syndrome. Peter’s guilt over Uncle Ben’s death is still very present, particularly when he sees Aunt May doing some budgeting and cutting costs. Personally, he doesn’t reckon himself a Thor or Fantastic Four. Desperate to help out Aunt May, he sets aside his morals and sells his services to Maxie, his agent.

    We get our first shot of Jonah Jameson as well. In a “let’s go back and give him a reason to hate” moment (I’m sure there’s a trope name for that), Amazing Fantasy #18 has J.J.’s astronaut son booted off a TV show in favor of Spider-Man. His son doesn’t take it too personally but the grudge is very much developing. Also there is Flash Thompson who plays a tiny role in motivating Spider-Man in his time of need.

    Mid-broadcast, our friend from last issue, Super Battery (great name) pops up. We’re dishes his ‘tragic’ backstory about him and his father’s experiments to engineer a super hero. These experiments result in his father’s death and his own metamorphosis. He has a revelation and decides that all super heroes are actually freaks surrounded by tragedy. To prove his point, he holds the audience hostage to instantly kill them all, painlessly, he assures us. You can see how this might make Spidey more guilty considering his own abilities are surrounded by the tragedy of his Uncle.


    He first goes off to try and get the Fantastic Four to come to the rescue, but realizes that people would be dying while he’s off to find them. Instead, he finds the courage through the power of witty TV related remarks (because they are on taped television) to take on Super Battery. His luck eventually runs out, but as mentioned earlier, Flash manages to motivate Spidey and he comes up with the idea of plugging into Super Battery and sucking all the power out of him. I don’t know if this pseudo-science solution is valid but we’ll go with it. Super Battery is sucked dry but he promises we’ll eventually see what he meant.

    Spider-Man realizes that his uncle’s death has nothing to do with his super powers and he’d still have them whether he was alive or not and would still have the responsibility to protect people - because he can, he should. Spidey finally accepts himself as a super hero.

    Also featured: Iron Man is making a name for himself around this time in a casual mention.

    Oh, and Maxie goes to jail because he’s kinda the one that got Super Battery in the building. I’m sure Super Battery didn’t need to pay Maxie to get on the show though, probably could’ve just done a hostile takeover without legally getting the gig.

    Next up: Amazing Spider-Man #1

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    The Amazing Spider-Man #1 (1963)
    Stan Lee & Steve Ditko

    A recap reminds us of Peter Parker’s situation. Got bit by a spider. Uncle Ben got shot when a burglar tried to rob their house (I think they added details here, don’t remember if they specified how the shooting happened last time). He caught the burglar and hung him from his webs for the police to arrest. Now they’re broke and trying to figure out how to pay the bills.

    The interlude issues don’t perfectly mesh-up here. We see Peter considering quitting school to get a job and when he’s dissuaded for that, he’s once more considering how to use his abilities for profit (including being a criminal, before thinking better of it because he doesn’t want to get arrested, that’s the only thing stopping me from being a criminal too) and decides to go back to his performance gig. He calls up his agent (Maxie’s in prison so let’s present this oddly similar looking agent is just his twin) and gets a gig and paycheck too boot - though he finds out pretty quick he can’t cash in a paycheck as Spidey.


    When Spidey is back around to get another gig, he discovers that J. Jonah Jameson’s slander has begun. This is a nice continuity from the interlude issues and actually makes his rant a lot more sensical and less sudden. He berates Spidey as a vigilante and as a bad idol for the youth, while highlighting his son, a test pilot as someone to look up to, following pretty well on Spidey stealing John Jameson’s act in the interludes.

    Peter whines about Fantastic Four and Ant-Man getting to perform and has to try to find a part-time job though that’s a pointless endeavor (I can sympathize, was never able to find a part-time job in high school). When he spies Aunt May pawning off her jewelry, he decides he’ll have to stalk the night. It’s great how this can pretty easily pass as a villain’s origin story.

    Before that, Peter decides to watch John Jameson’s rocket launch and as you might expect, everything goes to shit. John Jameson’s capsule gets loose and he’s pretty much guaranteed to crash. They try to parachute a net to stop it but that’s a fruitless endeavor. Fortunately, Spidey pops up to inform them that he can do it. Jonah disagrees but reluctant approval from one of the actual guys in charge is enough for Peter. He gets on a jet thanks to a good Samaritan and manages to jump onto the rocket thanks to his webs. He reattaches the capsule and saves young John Jameson.

    Sadly for Peter, that doesn’t raise his standings in Jonah’s books and Jonah’s still calling for him to be arrested and prosecuted the next day. He lays claim to a conspiracy where Spider-Man sabotaged the test to steal the spotlight. I mean, it’s a pretty credible argument. So, having seen even his good actions viewed negatively by the public, Peter considers truly becoming a villain




    Bonus stuff: Peter Parker figures out a way to get some cash. He plans out a Fantastic Four home invasion and pretty much beats the shit out of all of them before demanding a max salary. Peter’s got some balls. When they’re unveiled to be a non-profit, Peter bounces pretty quick, they were willing to help to. Peter’s a real asshole.

    Chameleon makes his debut and figures out that Spider-Man might be pretty desperate for cash if he home invaded the Fantastic Four. He steals some defense plans disguised as Spidey and calls Spidey up just in time to take the fall. Peter figures out the ploy pretty quick and catches up to Chameleon (helicopter be damned) to drag him back to where he stole the plans (also preventing some damn commies from getting them). Chameleon is able to escape and disguise himself as a cop but thanks to his Spidey senses, he can tell which one is off. Still Chameleon is able to turn everyone against Spidey again so Peter Parker rage quits and literally runs off crying… the cops catch the Chameleon in like a second once Peter is gone.

    The chapter ends with the Fantastic Four wondering what might happen if Peter Parker fulfills his villain origin story.


    Debuts: Chameleon~, and Fantastic Four!

    Editor's Notes: ​Woo! PROGRESS!

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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    Bravo Jon yeah it's tough in these streets when you can't cash a check in a Costume. Lucky Peter didn't have to work as a Call Girl to help Aunt May play the bills. Here's hoping you get to Amazing Spider-Man 300 with the debut of Venom.
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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    The Amazing Spider-Man #2 (1963)
    Stan Lee & Steve Ditko

    On the #2 edition of Spider-Man we get The Spectacular Spider-Man villain, Vulture’s debut. Vulture’s made a name for himself being able to fly and more or less, come from outta nowhere. When Parker realizes that pictures of The Vulture will fetch a high price, he gets one of Uncle Ben’s old cameras to pursue the ole’ bird. On the flipside, Vulture plots a way to steal a million dollars worth of jewels.

    Vulture is confident enough in his ploys that he goes around town literally sending messages to people that he’s plotting to steal the jewelry. Everybody thinks he’s an arrogant ass for it but they’re also all attending the transport to see if Vulture can actually pull it off. Meanwhile, Spider-Man happens to spot Vulture whilst he’s yelling out his intentions and catches a few pictures. In a brilliant bit of writing, Vulture knocks out Spider-Man and instead of dropping him from yay-high, he opens up a water tank and tosses him inside. Spidey wakes up in time to go to the bottom and jump right out. Vulture should’ve tried harder.

    Peter’s cool with it. He’s got his pictures and he decides to start adding some gadgets to his Spider-Man costume, including a hidden belt, camera, some extra web-shooters and a device to take down Vulture. Bonus points, he gets paid straight from Jonah Jameson for the pictures in his first deal with the news man.

    On a sidenote, man, I feel like all of Peter’s classmates want to include Peter but he just isolates himself so they pissed and start calling him names. I mean, it’s not the best way for them to deal with it but Peter’s kind’ve a dick.

    Back to the plot, Vulture’s way of stealing the jewelry is actually pretty clever. He subverts everyone’s expectations and steals the jewelry right from under their nose (literally) by popping out of the sewers, grabbing them, and flying away through the sewers before they have a chance to react. Sadly for him, Peter’s already figured out the trick to his wings and uses his special device to quasi-deactivate it and get some pictures to boot. He’s able to solve his and Aunt May’s financial issues, have his first legitimate villain into the Rogues Gallery (because let’s be real, the cops did their job with Chameleon) and for the most part, he’s slightly less of a whiny bitch here than last issue.


    More interesting than Peter’s duel with the Chameleon is the debut of the Tinkerer. Peter gets a gig as the assistant of a scientist, Dr. Cobbwell. The good doctor tells Peter to go pick up a radio at the Tinkerer’s shop. Peter’s pessimism about the super cheap prices of the radio shop and the shitty shop name leaves him suspicious so after discovering there’s something hidden in the radio, he heads back.

    At the shop, he discovers that the Tinkerer is actually working for a bunch of aliens (who seem prone to telling the Tinkerer to shut the fuck up even if he never listens). Peter’s quick to accept the presence of aliens, I guess you can justify that with his powers but still, it’s a huge leap from mutating from a spider-bite to accepting the presence of aliens as no big deal. Anyways, he gets stunned and in a classic “let’s find a contrived way to kill him” moment reflecting Vulture’s from earlier, they toss him in a tiny cage with the intent of suffocating him instead of just blowing his head off right then and there while he’s stunned.

    Peter manages to get out, break the machine, start a fire and escape in time to head back to Dr. Cobbwell’s office (who spots the space ship flying away but at least has the sense to not believe it). Peter isn’t too salty about the aliens just doing their job, he’s more pissed about the Tinkerer betraying mankind but discovers by the end that the Tinkerer was actually wearing a mask and may not be who he pretended to be.


    Can’t tell if that’s the Chameleon back or if it’s a Skrull hint. The aliens looked kind of Skrullish.

    Debuts: Chameleon, Tinkerer, and some aliens~

  19. #19
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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    The Amazing Spider-Man #3 (1963)
    Stan Lee & Steve Ditko

    You know one thing I’ve always hated about comics? It feels like they always telegraph what’s going to happen and spoil their own shit. Like if X is gonna die, they’ll literally call the entire series “Death of X”. Anyways, the title page of this one shows “Doctor Octopus, The Only Enemy To Ever Defeat Spider-Man!” Thanks for that. Also Vulture defeated Spider-Man, he just didn’t finish the job, and I presume Doc Ock doesn’t either consider the millions of issues that will follow for the next 60 years. Anyways, onwards we go.

    Spider-Man’s been faring pretty well since Vulture and the Tinkerer. He has his wing webbings (I’m not sure if those are new or if he had it in the other issues actually) and a new Batman style spotlight to announce his arrival. Getting rid of a couple of thugs, supremely arrogant Peter Parker wants a bigger challenge since shit’s too easy.

    Cue in Doctor Octopus. He’s an atomic researcher who uses four mechanical arms for some nuclear experiments. One such experiment goes wrong and he loses consciousness, has some brain trauma, and has the mechanical arms melted into him. He discovers he’s able to control his arms with his mind, and with that brain trauma, suddenly turns into a dastardly super villain. He takes over the plant and force the people there to start working for him. Meanwhile, Peter Parker gets a gig from Jonah Jameson to go get pics of Doc Ock.

    Peter manages to locate ole Doc Ock just in time to save one of his hostages from getting hurt. Doc Ock is pretty quick to beat the shit out of Spider-Man (or Super Man, whatever you want to call him) and instead of killing Spider-Man, just tosses him out of the building, figuring he isn’t worth killing. Peter Parker gets super depressed and presumes that it is indeed the end of Spider-Man. At the very least the hostages were smart enough to escape during the fight forcing Doc Ock to find another plant to hole up in.


    He succeeds too, taking over a plant and evacuating everyone with the threat of death. Now, he’s super intelligent, and has Spider-Man level super strength, and supposedly bad intentions but it’s never really clear what he’s aiming to do aside from experiments with nuclear technology. It’s not like he’s killed anyone really. If he had a bit more rationale, he probably could’ve just kept on with his life and had it his way without being a dick to everyone. But I guess that’s the whole brain trauma.


    The government enlists Human Torch for help (with the rest of Fantastic Four busy) but since the Torch has to recharge his abilities, he gives a fun speech in the meanwhile about never giving up which speaks to the heart of Peter Parker whom had completely given up. Peter decides he’ll give it another shot and infiltrates Doc Ock’s plant. He concocts a chemical experiment (I’d have advised maybe doing it before you got to the building instead of at the building, you know, just in case you couldn’t find the room in time or whatever) that allows him to melt two of Doc Ock’s arms together. Then, with a perfectly timed punch, knocks Doc Ock down. Sadly for Doc Ock, the super strength extends only to those mechanical arms and not the rest of his body.


    ​'Merica.

    In case you were wondering, he didn’t take the pictures, failing to the first time, and to focused the second time. At the very least he saves the day and credits Torch for his success.

    Debuts: Doc Ock

  20. #20
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    Re: Jon Reviews The Amazing Spider-Man (1963 - Current)

    The Amazing Spider-Man #4 (1963)
    Stan Lee & Steve Ditko


    Don't call it a come back.


    It's time for Fuji's long-awaited Sandman debut in the record-breaking (not sure which record) 4th issue of The Amazing Spider-Man.




    Spider-Man discovers early on in this issue that it's maybe better to apprehend people after they commit a crime instead of beforehand. The three criminals turn out to be smarter than most and call the cops to arrest Spider-Man after they've been assaulted by him unlawfully. They should've pressed charges, but for some reason they opt against it.


    Next up, he runs into the star of this issue, The Sandman. After ripping his mask open and discovering how invulnerable Sandman is, Spidey cuts his losses and runs away.


    He goes back home to sew his mask back together meanwhile Sandman gets back into the bank-robbing gig and spends his time playing cops and robbers with the NYPD.



    Don't be suspicious of a random pile of sand while you're looking for a guy who can transform into sand.


    Back at school, Liz, having finally accepted Peter Parker's request to go out with him, gets rejected when Peter prioritizes catching Sandman that evening. Conveniently enough, Sandman's decided to hide in a high school - the high school Peter goes to, of course - so the cops can finally give him a break. There, he runs into the principal of the school, a man with enough conviction to stand his ground against Sandman. Thanks to Spider-Man's timely arrival, the principal doesn't actually have to fight Sandman.


    Chekhov's Vacuum Cleaner


    Spider-Man and Sandman engage in fisticuffs where Spider-Man is reminded over and over again that none of his ordinary tactics are going to work against a man made of sand. Still, he manages to lure Sandman down to the school's basement where he uses a vacuum - one he just discovered some dozens of minutes earlier while running an errand for his professor - to vacuum Sandman and save the day.




    Unfortunately for Peter, Liz doesn't need to be anyone's second choice in life and she rejects him after he says that his schedule has cleared up. Peter nearly loses his cool after Flash insults him but thinks better of it. That, plus J. Jonah Jameson publishing more slander about him has him feeling down more than ever about his life as a super hero. He ends the issue holding out hope that the world will understand he does what he does for the greater good.


    Peter Parker continues to be a little bitch in this issue, but I'll give him credit for profiting off J. Jonah Jameson's hatred of Spider-Man. Not totally sure why Sandman couldn't just slip out of the vacuum since he's basically a bunch of sentient sand grains but I don't know vacuum biology.

    Debuts: The Sandman


    Next up: Amazing Spider-Man #5

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