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Thread: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

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    Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Alright, so this is another companion piece to my UWFI thread. I wanted to see if there is anyone on the boards that knows anything or has any opinions about PWFG. I've learned a lot about Japanese wrestling lately in an attempt to broaden my horizons a bit. I wrote about this in my UWFI thread. Pro Wresting Fujiwara Gumi is a promotion that was launched in Japan in 1991 out of the ashes of the second incarnation of the UWF. Four key wrestlers from UWF broke off and started their own vanity projects, three of them all around the same time in 1991. Satoru Sayama(Tiger Mask), Akira Maeda, Yoshiaki Fujiwara, and Nobuhiko Takada were four of the main wrestlers from the UWF. Sayama broke away from the group and founded Shooto in the mid-80's. After the UWF went out of business in the end of 1990 Takada, Maeda, and Fujiwara broke off and started their own vanity projects. Takada started UWFI, Maeda started Rings, and Fujiwara started Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi. Each of these promotions focused on more realistic style of wrestling and were the forerunners to modern day MMA. Rings eventually evolved into a full shoot promotion that produced talents like Fedor Emelianenko and Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira. UWFI fell apart and was eventually put back together as Pride Fighting Championships, the greatest MMA promotion ever. As for Fujiwara he would eventually go back to New Japan but three of his top students, Minoru Suzuki, Masakatsu Funaki, and Ken Shamrock, would go on to start Pancrase.

    What makes PWFG interesting to me is that Fujiwara was a top student of Karl Gotch, who was a master shooter that learned alongside Billy Robinson in the Snake Pit in Wigan England. Fujiwara and Gotch were instrumental in passing the forgotten art of catch wrestling on to a whole new generation of wrestlers.

    Ken Shamrock got his start in PWFG, as did Glen "Kane" Jacobs and a few other notable names. I plan on reviewing some of the shows in this thread so feel free to discuss anything related to this promotion if you have anything to add.

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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi


    May 16th, 1991
    Korakuen Hall
    Tokyo, Japan





    I have fallen head over heels in love with this stuff. This show that I am reviewing now is the second PWFG show. I can not for the life of me find the first show, which took place in March of 1991, a show that I would love to get in my hands if only just to see the 30 minute draw with Wayne Shamrock and Suzuki. Here are the results for the first ever PWFG show:


    Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi, March 4th 1991 @ Korakuen Hall in Tokyo, Japan


    Wellington Wilkins Jr. defeats Yusuke Fuke (11:58)
    Yoshiaki Fujiwara defeats Johnny Barrett (7:10)
    Minoru Suzuki vs. Wayne Shamrock - Time Limit Draw (30:00)
    Masakatsu Funaki defeats Bart Vale (17:36)...

    I will review all of these that I can get my hands on. I'm in love. To put things into context with this show this takes place about a week after the very first UWFI and Fighting Network Rings shows. This is a good two years before the first ever UFC show and nobody even knows how awesome Mark Rypien is yet. So lets dig into this.


    First off this show starts off with some awesome music that sounds like something you would hear in a movie like Best of the Best. Karl Gotch and Fujiwara are shown in the ring with all of their Japanese students, Suzuki, Funaki, and several others, teaching them all in a training session, showing them submissions. Pretty awesome. Then all of the wrestlers come out to the ring and line up for the opening ceremony. Minoru Suzuki, Fujiwara, Funaki, and Ken Shamrock all come out. Shamrock is pretty boss here. If you thought he looked awesome in the early UFC's, you should check him out here in his PWFG days because he's younger, bigger, and with longer hair. He looks like something out of a video game or something.


    So then Karl Gotch comes out and takes the center of the ring, with the Japanese wrestlers to his left and the foreigners to his right. Gotch gets a bouquet of flowers presented to him and then says this speach:




    Ladies and gentleman, the road to success is paved in blood, sweat, and tears. The first steps have been made and a lot of hard work lays ahead of us, but with the spirit that Fujiwara Gumi has, we can face the future with confidence. I hope that we can give wrestling back the honor that it deserves, so that it can be done in the same respect as boxing, which it once has. It's time to give the public what they paid for and not take their money in false pretenses of impersonating professional wrestling. Thank you.


    -Karl Gotch

    Very interesting stuff, especially considering he has Ken Shamrock in the ring with him. What makes that significant is that Shamrock was what the early UFC shows were built around. Without Ken Shamrock and Royce Gracie, the first four or five UFC shows would have been disasters. Shamrock along with Royce Gracie were the ones that brought the technique to the UFC and showed people that there was some element of sport, that it wasn't JUST blood and violence. Not to mention Shamrock had the it factor something fierce, his rivalry with Royce Gracie elevated the UFC in 93-95 to where they were selling more PPV's than WCW or WWF. MMA and the UFC declined when Shamrock left in 97(there were a bunch of other factors, but losing Shamrock was one of the biggest), and it never really recovered until he came back in 2002 for his fight with Tito Ortiz, then again in 2005-2006 when their rivalry helped push the sport into the mainstream. Many people forget that the main event attraction for the watershed Forrest Griffin vs Stephan Bonnar fight in 2005 was Ken Shamrock vs Rich Franklin. Bonnar and Griffin stole the show but Shamrock was the show(even though he lost that fight badly, it's besides the point). So at the end of the day, in their own way, Gotch and his boys achieved what they set out to do, exactly what he says in this promo.


    Minoru Suzuki vs Kazuo Takahashi


    Suzuki is the young gun of PWFG. These two actually fought each other in a fight in Pancrase in 1998. Takahashi has about sixty fights on his record on the Sherdog database, which is the authority on MMA records. Takahashi fought in the UFC once at UFC XII, but most of his sixty fights were in Pancrase, and I'd bet a good number of those were worked. Suzuki would go on with Funaki to be the founding fathers of Pancrase, helping train most of their fighters, including Shamrock, his brother Frank Shamrock, and Bas Rutten.


    We get some nice grappling exchanges here until Suzuki drops Takahashi with a stiff knee to the belly, followed by an uppercut palm strike. Suzuki works his way into a full mount and goes for an Arm Triangle Choke. Takahashi works his way out of the choke but Suzuki goes for an armbar. Takahashi slips free of the armbar but Suzuki catches him shortly after and forces the submission after only 3:22. Not much to this, pretty much a squash.




    Bart Vale vs Yusuke Fuke


    This was a fun match that got some good reactions out of the audience. Vale is a much bigger American bad ass guy here with some great kicks for a man his size. Fuke is smaller and going for submissions most of the match. Vale matches him on the ground using strength, escaping Fuke's submissions with kicks on the ground. Fuke catches Vale's kicks and takes him down into submissions but Vale kicks his way out. Vale hooks a heel hook at one point and Fuke slaps him in the face a few times before reversing him. The flow of the match and everything feels very real. The positioning and the transitions are things you would see in a modern MMA fight. Side mounts, full mounts, sweeps. Vale gets Fuke into a rear choke on the ground at one point and Fuke escapes into a full mount, the crowd pops for it. They work their way into a turtle position with Vale locking on a Half Nelson, Fuke reverses into a cross armbreaker/armbar and the crowd pops big time for him, then they go silent and just watch. Best part of the match comes after Fuke gets a takedown on a kick attempt from Vale. Fuke locks on an ankle lock and smacks Vale in the face as he leans up and tries to escape. Vale eventually stomps Fuke with his foot before breaking out of the hold. Pretty stiff.


    Vale gets the knockout at 10:58 when Fuke charges in on a takedown attempt. Vale hops up with a knee similar to what Frank Mir tried on Brock Lesnar in their second fight, only this one lands dead on. Fuke goes down for the 10 count and it's over. Vale wins. 2 Stars


    Yoshiaki Fujiwara vs Wellington Wilkins Jr.


    Awesome start to this match as Wilkins takes Fujiwara down and gets his legs like he's going for a Boston Crab, only for Fujiwara to perform one of the most believable spin out counters I've ever seen.


    Willington gets Fujiwara's arm and goes for an armbar from his back but Fujiwara holds it off and tells him something in Japanese that gets the fans excited. They break apart and stand. Fujiwara backs Wilkins into the corner and smacks his face after headbutting him. Fujiwara locks on his Fujiwara armbar and the crowd goes crazy until Wilkins gets a rope break. Fujiwara starts taunting Wilkins and the fans are loving every bit of it. Fujiwara checks one of Wilkins' kicks perfectly and then takes him down, landing in side control. Wilkins knees Fujiwara from his back and Fujiwara responds by smacking the shit out of him, then stomping him. They stand back up and Fujiwara drops him with a German followed by a bunch of headbutts. Fujiwara takes Wlikins down with a nice legsweep later on, hooking him in a leg lock. Wilkins gets a rope break and smacks the fuck out of Fujiwara when their stood back up. The finish comes after Fujiwara twists this guy's ankle every way you could possibly imagine in a few different holds. Fujiwara puts him away by dragging him out to the center of the ring and locking on an ankle lock, forcing the submission. Decent match. Fujiwara added a bit of showmanship to it and had more of a pro wrestling flare than a lot of the other PWFG matches I've seen so far. 2 Stars




    Naoki Sano vs Wayne Shamrock


    Very high level grappling going on here in this match. I know Sano fought Royler Gracie in one of the first Pride shows and he did not do very well. Both guys are very explosive. Some violent heel hook submissions before Shamrock uses a nice fireman carry takeover into a hammerlock from side mount. Another nice little touch in the match is when Sano sells the fatique in his arm when he gives up a submission. This is just old time wrestling. This is what Gotch and Hackenschmidt were doing but just taken in a different direction, a different version of what the Gold Dust Trio had in mind with their Slam Bang Western Style that they pioneered in the 20's.


    Very violent grappling going on here as these guys try to rip each other's heads off with submissions. They finally stand it back up and Shamrock goes crazy with palm strikes like he's in a Rocky movies, landing some stiff shots, just wild hook palm strikes. Sano clinches up and lands an AWESOME underhook DDT! Shamrock recovers and starts working Sano's arm over, eventually taking his back in the Turtle Position and puling him back into a choke. Sano fights the choke off and gets a rope break.


    They clinch up later and Shamrock lands an ubelievable underhook suplex, flipping Sano over into the canvas and immediately going for the Hammerlock. Sano rolls over to give up his back. Shamrock transitions over to get a Fisherman hook on Sano's leg but Sano breaks loose and unloads on some nice punches followed by a spinning back kick. Shamrock gets up on the eight count and these two guys fucking slug it out in an awesome striking exchange, very intense, very stiff, open handed striking exchange.


    Both guys get exhausted and the action comes to a stand still for a moment on the mat with Shamrock attacking Sano's arm from the Turtle Position, eventually flipping him over to his back and going for the double wrist lock. Shamrock just dominates Sano on the ground until Sano catches him in a double wrist lock. Shamrock escapes and locks on a Fujiwara but Sano quickly escapes. Shamrock then works his way into the headscissor/double wrist lock position but Sano works his way out. Shamrock keeps Sano's back in the Turtle Position. Sano recovers to his feet and then drops back down into an STF! Shamrock gets a rope break. That was awesome.


    Shamrock then begins destroying Sano with stiff kicks, knees, and elbows. Shamrock throws Sano to the canvas and lets the referee begin counting. Sano gets up and nine and gets the crowd fired up by fighting back against Shamrock in a mad flurry of strikes. They go back to the Turtle Position and Shamrock rips Sano up from his roots into a German Suplex. Sano gets up at nine to break the refs count and Shamrock just begins peppering with strikes. Shamrock goes for a leg scissor takedown but Sano just falls on top of him. Both guys are completely exhausted at this point. Sano has Shamrock's back in the Turtle Position. They take a rest for a moment and it just hits a point where they are so tired they can barely move. The crowd goes silent. The match gets pretty boring from here. Shamrock gets another ankle lock but Sano gets another rope break. They stand back up and Shamrock goes for his leg scissor takedown attempt again and can't get it. They both fight for each other's ankles with Shamrock on the ground on his back and Sano standing. Shamrock eventually breaks Sano down and locks on a Knee Bar but Sano gets another rope break.


    Shamrock is so dynamic on the ground in the late stages of this match with some of his rolling transitions and some of his submission attempts. You could tell he was just something else on the mats and he had a one of a kind dexterity for a man his size. The final seconds approach with Shamrock destroying Sano with STIFF open hand chops. Sano takes Shamrock's back and hits him with a DRAGON SUPLEX! Sano transitions into a Fujiwara armbar and forces Shamrock to submit! Fun match overall but there were some real dead spots that drug on. Some great grappling here though, way ahead of it's time, that's for sure. 3 Stars


    Masakatsu Funaki vs Johnny Barrett


    Not much to this match as it's pretty much all Funaki. Barrett is a bigger, more overweight, less athletic looking guy and he gets little to no offense in this match. Something I've seen a lot in the PWFG and UWFI shows I've seen so far is how they use a nice little headscissor neckcrank as like a setup for the strait armbar, or vice versa. That is something I'm definitely going to try next time I roll with someone. I always like using the armbar, gogoplata, ommo platta, and triangle chokes as a chain of submissions, going back and forth from one to another to keep my opponent on the defensive mode, sooner or later they always get caught if you just keep going back and forth from hold to hold, now I want to try working that sweet little headscissor neck crank into that chain.


    Funaki blasts this guy with kicks and then lands a double arm overhead suplex, transitioning from there right into a strait armbar for the submission at 9:40. Pretty lopsided match, Funaki is the man.


    This was another fun show if only for Gotch's promo at the start with all of the legends in the ring with him. Shamrock vs Sano was the best match of the show. I'm really looking forward to watching through some more of these.

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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    I don't know as much about the behind-the-scenes of PWFG as the other two, other than it not being as successful as it's contemparies and Fujiwara driving off the entire roster (who went on to create my favorite shoot style promotion ever, BattlArts).

    I enjoyed Shamrock/Sano quite a bit more than you did. I'd have that in my top 30 matches of 1991 for sure and I've seen others rate it higher. (along with the Fujiwara match which I'm more in line with you on) Even in those "dead parts" everything was spirited and felt like a true struggle. And to be honest with you for a 25 minute match there wasn't nearly as much downtime as I first expected. They worked a great pace for shoot style imo and I greatly enjoyed it.

    Sano has a match vs Suzuki right around the corner in about 2 months that you may just enjoy even more.
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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Yeah that Shamrock vs Sano match was a treat. Of all of the shoot style promotions I'd have to say PWFG is my favorite so far. Shamrock vs Sano was like a pro wrestling version of a Rocky fight.

    I'm interested in how Battlearts splintered off from PWFG? I don't know anything about Battlearts other than maybe Ikuto Hidaka, who I enjoyed in the dying days of ECW(I looked up some of Hidaka's highlights and may or may not have seen some Battlearts clips, Zero 1? It looked pretty cool).

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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    All I know is PWFG had money problems and there was political disagreements. Similar to the AJPW/NOAH split except with Misawa as Yuki Ishikawa and Mrs. Baba as Fujiwara himself.

    The promotion bottomed out for awhile in 2002 (One of their biggest sponsors backed out) and went basically dark for five years and then around 2008 had an awesome comeback based around Ishikawa's trainees, also known as Gen II Bati-Bati wrestlers. If you ever get through PWFG or onto BattlArts we can get more in-depth in terms of matches and such, especially since Ishikawa & Ikeda start to come into their own in PWFG and doing good stuff.

    Hidaka's a great wrestler, though he's wrestled much more for Zero-1 over the years (BattlArts only ran a couple of shows per year from '02-'07 and monthly from '07-'11) and is more of a "hybrid" wrestler than a definitive shoot-styler. But he's had great Bati-Bati matches too. I'm a huge fan of his as a pro wrestler.

    Back to PWFG, by this point I totally agree that it's the best company of the three. RINGS had nobody yet and I personally rate Takada lower than many shoot-style fans, & like I mentioned in my original UWF-i post it was never my favorite. But PWFG was a consistently good company out of the gate, probably due to Fujiwara's influence and simply having the best guys at jump street. Some real good stuff from '91-'92.
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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    PWFG had some weird shit at times.

    Shamrock vs Sano is great. There is a Sano vs Suzuki match from '91 that is incredible and one of the best shoot style matches ever too.

    RINGS is my favourite shoot style promotion though.


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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Pro Wrestling Fujiwara-Gumi was formed in early 1991, after the fall of the second UWF. The company was started by Yoshiaki Fujiwara and had the financial ...
    AED

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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi
    One For All And All For One



    July 26th, 1991
    Tokyo Bay NK Hall
    Urayasu, Chiba, Japan



    I watched this recently with my little brother and we went into Mystery Science Theater 3000 mode with this and had an absolute blast watching it. This is the third ever PWFG show. There is no commentary for this but there is some television editing and some music/highlight packages showing the intros, plus a few interviews with some of the Japanese wrestlers, Sano and Suzuki. The show starts off with highlights of the wrestlers warming up in the ring, stretching, sparring, etc. Then everyone is shown coming out to the ring in front of the audience, Japanese guys on one side, foreigners on the other in single file line. The music on the show sounds like it was recorded through a Sega Genesis. +1


    Mark Rush vs Kazuo Takahashi


    Takahashi would go on to be a star for Pancrase. He also came over and fought in the UFC 12 lightweight tournament, doing pretty well against Wallid Ismail. Mark Rush is a big muscled up American in his 40's, looks like a legit tough dude. Rush had some experience in the UWF Reborn shows prior to this but this is the first time I've ever seen or heard of him.

    This was a very fun, very realistic looking match. The Japanese fans marking out for simple little wrestling transitions always gives me goosebumps. This had a lot of realistic amateur style scrambling, but they would throw in the occassional enziguiri here and there. The positioning and the transitioning from position to position is all very legit. The crowd is quiet for most of the match. There are times when they are deadlocked in a position in a stalemate, which only adds to the realism. They work their way into some nice slam spots. The escapes and transitions out of the holds is very entertaining from a technical standpoint. The whole match had a good athletic competition feel to it. There were times when Takahashi would go for suplexes but Rush would just drop dead weight to prevent it. It feels like a real sparring match at times. Takahashi almost hooks a cross armbreaker/armbar at one point but Rush gets his legs to the ropes. There are no special rules for rope breaks and there is no point system so I like that over what UWFI was going for.

    Rush uses some knees to the body and a hiptoss to land in side control and lock in a hammerlock(aka Over the Top Double Wrist Lock, Americana, or Keylock). Takahashi gets a rope break. Something interesting is how Takahashi works from his back using a Jujitsu guard. It's interesting because Jujitsu like this wasn't even really a thing yet over here in the USA, and wouldn't be until UFC 1 two years down the road from this. You are seeing positioning and grappling here that is pretty far ahead of it's time, regardless of whether or not it's worked or shoot.

    They get the crowd into the match when Takahashi lands a high single and slams Rush, going right into an ankle lock. Takahashi goes for a headlock but Rush lifts him and slams him. Takahashi goes right into half guard and eventually works his way into what looked like an upside down triangle attempt(probably more of a headscissor neck crank). Rush wins it with some more slams and a pretty nasty looking neck crank/crossface at 11:45. My reviews are probably not a lot of fun to read since I like to go for a move by move description as opposed to a cliffs notes summary. A big reason why I like reviewing these matches this way is just to have a personal reference. Some of these submissions and holds are new to me and I would like to come back to them and take a closer look in the future and maybe try some of them myself next time I roll with someone. This particular neck crank looked especially effective and is something I will definitely be coming back to. 2 & 1/2 Stars


    Bart Vale vs Lato Kiraware


    Bart Vale is a pretty big bad ass looking dude. He's stacked and very light on his feet in this match. His opponent is a bigger heavyset Samoan looking dude. Bart Vale really lights this guy up with some stiff strikes that make me second guess this being worked. The big guy takes Vale down and smothers him for a bit but Vale gets out from under him and destroys him with strikes. Man, I honestly can't remember the finish to this so I won't rate it, I do remember really enjoying this though as Vale comes off as a bad mofo. (5:49)


    Wayne Shamrock vs Duane Koslowski


    These old Ken Shamrock matches blow my mind. Here you have a MMA legend two years before his UFC debut doing Japanese worked shootfighting matches. The thing is when he came over to UFC they hyped him up as a "Shootfighter", this being back during the style vs style era of the UFC. I always wondered what exactly they meant by Shamrock being a Shootfighter, and now I'm actually watching and seeing exactly what Shamrock came from it is kind of crazy to me as someone that never really connected the dots until now. I remember them interviewing him in one of the early UFC's and he spoke about how the UFC was easier than what he was used to in Japan because the fighters in the UFC didn't know submissions. I also read that when he came over for UFC 1 he was convinced that it was going to be a worked American version of PWFG, he was sure of this all the way up until it was time for him to walk out to fight Pat Smith in the first round of the tournament. Shamrock said that he was waiting all night for someone to come up to him and tell him the finish to his match, but it never happened. Talk about a pucker up moment.

    Some more info I recently learned from an excerpt of one of Shamrock's autobiographies was about how he was being recruited by UWFI, Rings, and PWFG after UWF died. He chose PWFG because he wanted to stay loyal to Funaki, who was his main trainer and one of the guys that was watching his back in UWF when he was a rookie. They paid Shamrock $30,000 up front in advance to wrestle in PWFG for a year. He ended up blowing through the money in a couple of months and went broke for the rest of the year. Shamrock found his niche in Japan during this time though and was becoming a master of submissions. Something interesting about this particular match was that Koslowski was a Silver Medalist amateur wrestler that PWFG recruited. They were bringing in Koslowski to do the job for Shamrock but he refused because he didn't want the amateur wrestling community to find out that he lost a match to a fake pro wrestler. Neither guy wanted to put the other guy over so they set Shamrock and Koslowki up in a legit shoot match in the dojo behind closed doors, with the arrangement being that whoever won would go over in their match in the upcoming show. Shamrock got the better of Koslowski and forced him to submit and earned his respect.

    Shamrock is fucking RIPPED as he's ever been, with long hair. Duane Koslowski looks like a foreigner from Russia or Europe, almost looks like old school boxer Tony Zale wearing a wrestling singlet. Shamrock is decked out in all black and looks awesome. This looks like a strait up shoot. In fact, my brother and I had fun going back and forth while watching this and trying to figure out of it was real or worked. The strikes were so stiff that it was really easy to suspend disbelief here. The way Shamrock explodes out of bad positions and submission attempts here is fucking amazing, you could see that he had the skills to dominate MMA. Shamrock's scrambling here is so explosive in this match it's amazing, just bursting out of Koslowski's holds.

    Koslowski takes a fucking beating in this match with some stiff as fuck strikes from Shamrock. He manages to close the distance and slam Shamrock a few times. Everything is so crisp and explosive that I really thought this was a shoot until the finish. Shamrock fucking EXPLODES into a Northern Lights Suplex that was incredible, the exact same suplex that he hit Matt Hume with in their worked fight in Pancrase a few years later. Shamrock goes right from that into an ankle lock for the submission at 9:56. This was fucking AWESOME. 3 & 1/2 Stars


    Napataya vs Yusuke Fuke


    This match had my brother and I marking out like school girls as both of us have always been pretty big fans of Muay Thai kickboxing culture and history. Napataya is a Muay Thai fighter from Thailand and he gets a full wai khru ceremony before the match complete with the authentic music they play during Thai boxing matches in Thailand. All of this is authentic Thai boxing tradition. This is a boxer vs wrestler match. Napataya is decked out in traditional Thai gear, gloves and all. Fuke is not wearing any gloves.

    This was a very fun match and there is no doubt in my mind that it was full 100% shoot. Napataya destroyed Fuke with legit Thai kicks to the legs and body. Fuke kept fighting to get a takedown but Napataya was able to get out of his grip and escape to the ropes in a mad scramble for his life. Napataya plays the heel role up as he taunts Fuke throughout the match, even doing some Anderson Silva style showboating. The funny part was in between rounds as Napataya's cornermen rubbed oil on his legs to keep Fuke from being able to take him down. They were shameless about it. You could even see Fuke making a fuss about it during the match, wiping the gunk from his hands at times. Napataya clung to the ropes and destroyed Fuke with strikes. This was fun and had great psychology even though it was a shoot.


    Minoru Suzuki vs. Naoki Sano - Time Limit Draw (30:00)...


    This was an incredible war. I was thrilled watching this match. They worked their way into so many dramatic spots and really milked them with the facial expressions in this match. This was a very cinematic style fight. The grappling was incredible, with Suzuki showing some Jujitsu positioning that was pretty ahead of his time, using the guard and the half guard. He went after Sano's leg at times and Sano sold it very well. The striking exchanges were like scenes out of Rocky at times. They kept the crowd white hot throughout the match. Something interesting that I caught was Suzuki going for "The Twister", which is a rare submission hold that has only been seen once in the UFC.




    This was just an unreal battle. It was very legit in the grappling and the slams, positioning, fighting for submissions. The strikes were fucking ridiculously stiff, drawing some bloody noses at times. What made it great though were the cinematic elements they brought into it with the facial expressions and the way they built up to the big submission spots. These two guys killed each other. There were some pro wrestling moments in the match like when Suzuki landed a piledriver at one point, and he landed a Dropkick a little later on in the match but it all worked well. The crowd ate up everything and made this fun. The finish was about as dramatic as you could get with both guys locked in each other's heel hooks, with Suzuki bleeding from the nose, both guys screaming as they try to snap each other's ankle's similar to the finish of the Don Frye vs Ken Shamrock fight in Pride. The clock runs out on them. Fucking epic battle. 4 Stars


    Yoshiaki Fujiwara vs Masakatsu Funaki


    This was another very fun match. Fujiwara is old and Funaki is the young gun. Funaki beats the dog shit out of Fujiwara all throughout the match with strikes, STIFF strikes. One of my favorite moments of the match came when Fujiwara went for an ankle lock as Funaki was fighting from his back. Funaki hit Fujiwara with an upkick and Fujiwara dropped like he was legit KO'd. It was a very realistic looking spot that you see happen often in MMA. So after 12:04 of beating the fuck out of the old man Funaki falls into a fucking awesome submission hold on the mat that I have no idea what to call, some form of a Crucifix hold, it was beautiful though, especially the way he set it up. Fujiwara used Funaki's own momentum and over-aggression against him and basically let him fall right into the hold. Funaki taps out. 3 & 3/4 Stars

    My god I loved this show. I need more. This was a lot better than the UWFI show I just reviewed. If you have any or know where I can get a collection of PWFG shows on DVD or even through downloading, you need to hit me up via my PM box. This was a fantastic show. The thing about it to me that intrigues me is just how divided American MMA and Pro Wrestling fans are. MMA fans balk at the mention of pro wrestling or the concept of the two genres being related, and it's the same on the other side of the coin with pro wrestling fans. If you were to show this show to a younger pro wrestling fan chances are they would shit on it as being fake MMA. The intriguing thing is that this show happened before MMA even existed, and yet you see so much of the MMA ideology and techniques at work here with PWFG. Fujiwara taught his wrestlers to work like this because this is what he learned from the original pro wrestling shooters. So PWFG and promotions like it really took pro wrestling back to it's roots, but MMA shares those same roots.
    Last edited by ShinobiMusashi; 04-09-2015 at 10:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Curtain Jerker

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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    shinobi- pm me

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    Sweet Meat
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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill C View Post
    shinobi- pm me
    dont do it

    Spoiler:

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve
    I stopped reading when it became clear it was the same butthurt smarkf*g "real wrasslin'" crybaby rant on every youtube vid featuring Cena.



    Quote Originally Posted by Buff Bagwell on John Cena
    But I think he's bigger than Buff Bagwell. I really do.
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    Re: Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood Dook View Post
    dont do it
    you know you want to

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