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Thread: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

  1. #81

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    I didn't mind the movie (more for the ghosts than anything else) but the babysitter character and her "I don't DO windows" line is so atrocious that it's the first thing I think of when this movie comes up. That's pretty bad.
    I'd much rather endure an entire movie filled with her one liners than a single scene with the little boy.

  2. #82
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    I really liked it and I am a Lillard fan but I'm not gonna lie and say it's good


  3. #83
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Wow. Lillard is 44 and i don't think he has aged since Scream.

  4. #84
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Great reviews I also loved See No Evil 2, even towards the end of the movie I knew Jacob would get the last laugh. Hey Jim I saw on your movie log you watched Horns, did you do a review on the film yet or ever planning to do one?

  5. #85

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by HoHo View Post
    Great reviews I also loved See No Evil 2, even towards the end of the movie I knew Jacob would get the last laugh. Hey Jim I saw on your movie log you watched Horns, did you do a review on the film yet or ever planning to do one?
    Uhh...

    You're not very observant in this thread, are you?

  6. #86
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Uhh...

    You're not very observant in this thread, are you?
    All you had to say in a respectful matter yeah I did check page 3 which I didn't check earlier.

  7. #87

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by HoHo View Post
    All you had to say in a respectful matter yeah I did check page 3 which I didn't check earlier.
    Bud, there's only been eleven reviews thus far. It's not as if it was some huge chore to see if I had reviewed it.

  8. #88

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #12
    Title: 13 Ghosts
    Country: United States
    Year: 1960
    Director: William Castle






    The Zorba family is down on their luck. On the day of their son's birthday, they get all of their furniture repossessed. Whether a coincidence or something other being at play, when the son wishes for a house with furniture that could never be taken away, a mysterious stranger shows up suddenly with a letter to see a lawyer the following day. The lawyer brings fantastic news as the distant uncle Plato Zorba has passed away and left his old house to his nephew. It's soon after the family moves into the house that the previous housemaid reveals that the house is haunted with a variety of ghosts. As the family becomes more and more concerned, the lawyer becomes far more interested in the happenings of the house after the little boy reveals a hidden stash of thousands of dollars. Is the Zorba family destined to become rich or will the ghosts get them first?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bwjk1q1gqIU

    Four decades before the ultra shittastic Thir13en Ghosts was made, the legendary horror director, used his typical movie theater experience while promoting his newest film of 13 Ghosts. As it's been mentioned in previous editions of Fright Fest (The Tingler and House on Haunted Hill), Castle was a fan of gimmicks and anything to do with trying to add fun for moviegoers. In the case of 13 Ghosts, Illusion-O glasses (Sorta like 3D glasses) were passed out to those that attended the movie at the theater. Supposedly, it enhanced the ghostly experience whenever the viewers would put on the glasses at the same time as when the characters would wear their own versions of the similar glasses. It may just be cheap 3D, but it's impossible not to love Castle when he's simply a guy who wanted to make the movie experience more fun. It's a pretty clever tactic when you're dealing with a constant stream of low budgets for your films.

    As I already reviewed the remake, one question some may have is how similar are the two films? Well, the very basic plot of a hard on their luck inheriting a house filled with ghosts remained the same. In both cases, the son is really into death, although in the original, he's more into ghost stories rather than real death. Both have a lawyer that is more concerned with hidden money rather than the well being of the family. There isn't a lot of similarities beyond that. The main plot of the remake is the attempt at creating a door to hell with the lawyer going after money sub-plot being such an insignificant aspect of the money. In the original, the evil nature of the film is nearly nonexistent. The original is just about a family coping with the realization that their new home is haunted, their inability to move out due to lack of funds and the lawyer doing anything he can in order to get his hands on the hidden money.

    Plot wise, I liked the remake more. The characters are in far more harm and you know that the ghosts are not looking to coexist together in a nice manner. This lack of danger in the original gives the film a feel that is reminiscent of a family film than a full fledged horror. Sure, it's a different time period, but even Castle's other films were more malevolent than 13 Ghosts. Not that it should be a surprise, but the effects in the remake far exceeded the original. Thanks to the Illusion-O gimmick, viewing the film without the glasses means that you're not getting a great look at any of the ghosts. You can certainly see them, but they're pretty pale looking. Some of the ghosts, the chef most notably, isn't scary in the least bit. There is one creepy looking ghost, but we end up finding out that part of why it was the scariest one is because it wasn't actually a ghost.

    Despite some weaknesses compared to the remake, what makes the original the far better film? The script actually makes sense for one. You understand the motivations of everyone, somehow the dialog is less corny than in the remake and each character is just a little more likable than in the remake. Take the son for an example. In the remake, I hated that little bastard. In the original, he got some laughs out of me in his handling of keeping a secret. The older sister is written as a cliche 50's TV teen girl, which works perfectly fine for this movie, unlike in the remake. Then there's the housekeeper of Elaine. Throughout the film, you're not sure if you can trust her due to her admitting to the fact that Plato Zorba was no longer trusting her in his final days. There's a fun little running gag with her with the son claiming she's a witch, which was played up whenever she held a broom. Chances are, that aspect of the character was written solely because of the actress who played the part. Playing the role of Elaine was none other than Margaret Hamilton (The Wizard of Oz's Wicked Witch of the West).

    Overall, 13 Ghosts isn't as strong of some of Castle's other films like The Tingler or The House on Haunted Hill. Then again, how could they be as good when it didn't have the best part of those two films - Vincent Price. Still, it's a fun little lighthearted 50's style horror that surpasses the remake in so many different simple ways. While I couldn't recommend the remake to anyone unless you were really into makeup of the ghosts, 13 Ghosts is worth checking out if you're a fan of that time period for horror. Still, I'd suggest watching the other Castle films I've mentioned in this review first.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:


    ----
    Coming up next, another requested movie gets reviewed.

  9. #89

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #13
    Title: Evidence
    Country: United States
    Year: 2013
    Director: Olatunde Osunsanmi





    In the middle of nowhere, Nevada, some 70 miles outside of Las Vegas, a horrific and brutal mass murder has taken place. As the police collects any sort of evidence they can find, a team comes together to examine the video footage captured on the video camera and cell phones of the poor victims. With the murderer still at large, it's up to the team to try and find any sort of lead as to who could be behind the killings. As they slowly make their way through the damaged footage, the team is startled by the fact that these killings were not done by an one time killer, but rather by a serial killer. Now with the fear that the killer may do it again, can the police find the incriminating evidence that they're searching for or will the killer simply slip through their fingers, being able to prepare to do it again?


    As the 2000's began, the Scream lead self aware horror boom was wrapping up some. There was a couple of years period where Japanese remakes were all of the rage thanks to The Ring. However, for the majority of the 2000's, the two most popular and whored out sub-genres were the torture porn (Saw) and the found footage (Paranormal Activity) films. By 2013, both of those types of horrors were pretty played out, but apparently that didn't make a difference. After stinking up the screen with his previous horror effort in The Fourth Kind, director, Osunsanmi, created a film that was essentially a torture porn film, but recorded as a found footage movie. Rather than seeming like a fresh idea, Evidence just feels extra stale.

    I do think that they managed to do the best they could to explain some of the initial problems with found footage. For example, why are we watching this found footage? Sometimes found footage films simply set up the story by finding a tape and randomly playing it. In Evidence, the viewer has to watch the footage because it's the job of the police to scour the videos to try and piece together what happened. Due to the fact that fire was involved in the killings, it nicely explained why the footage sometimes flat out sucked and had a lot of glitches and the likes. Give the filmmakers some credit, they attempted to do the standard found footage cliches, but explain them away using logic.

    Meanwhile, there's the torture porn aspect of the film. For these kinds of films, it's all about really gritty and difficult to watch torture or death scenes. You don't get to see a lot of up close and detail violence due to the found footage nature of the film, but the movie does have one of the more terrible ways to be killed in a horror. The unknown killer kills a couple of his victims by use of a welder's torch. It's a little difficult to watch as he's slowly just running the flame up and down the body while the poor victim is screaming in pain. If you're a fan of gruesome deaths, this one has them, only in the context of not seeing them too well due to the video footage. By the end of the film, the comparisons become crystal clear with the final few minutes being devoted to the ultra, mega, super, super twist while music is blaring to the revelation. It's so totally Saw that I'm looking around for the jigsaw doll to pop out somewhere. While I wasn't a particular fan of being reminded of the Saw series, the twist ending was so much more appealing than the original ending would leave you to believe is the killer. It's not a lot of fun when the mystery of who is the killer is revealed to be the one you were questioning from a very early stage. Checking IMDb (Where every movie in history has a thread calling it "The worst movie ever") and the ending seems to have divided the viewers down the middle. You either love it and think it's the best part of the movie or you hate it and think it's the worst part. I side on the former rather than the latter.

    Due to how immensely popular and over saturated the market was with found footage and torture porn films in the last decade, there's not a whole lot more to say. If you've seen a couple of those films, you know exactly what to expect. The film does have some tense moments and made me jump a few times. Granted, they were all cheap jump scenes, but a horror film partially succeeds whenever it can cause the viewer to be frightened at various points. The characters weren't anything amazing, but I found myself liking them all to some extent. I'm pretty confident the only reason why I cared about seeing Rachel survive is because the actress playing her, Caitlin Stasey, is super duper hot. Evidence doesn't bring anything new to the table. If you're sick to death of the torture porn or found footage sub genres, you may be better holding off on watching it just yet. However, if you don't mind watching those types of films still in 2014, Evidence certainly isn't a bad example of a mix between the two.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:


    ----
    Coming up next, in this incredibly well organized Fright Fest, Jim is once again unsure of what to watch next. Chances are it'll be a horror movie though.

  10. #90
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die



  11. #91

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by Professor Booty View Post
    Jack Frost could be fun to watch again. Provided I can find a proper link, I wouldn't be against watching and reviewing Jack Frost 1 and 2 at some point in the month.

  12. #92
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    The first is on YouTube in full


  13. #93

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #14
    Title: The Mummy's Tomb
    Country: United States
    Year: 1942
    Director: Harold Young





    Taking place thirty years after the events of The Mummy's Hands, Dr. Steve Banning is now an old man retelling his encounter with the mummy, Kharis, to all friends and family. Meanwhile, back in Egypt, Andoheb has somehow survived his multiple point blank gun shots by Babe all of those years ago. Just prior to his death, he gives over his knowledge and control of Kharis over to a new protege of Mehemet Bey. Just before Andoheb dies, he gives Bey the strict instructions to travel to America and use Kharis to kill all of those survivors that dared to disturb the tomb of Princess Ananka three decades ago. For Banning and his family and friends, they learn that their nightmare has never fully ended.


    Fans of Universal mummy movies would finally get a sequel after their original Mummy venture with Boris Karloff, failed to attain a sequel. While the Frankenstein series was already racking up the sequels quite nicely by 1942, the Mummy's Tomb is a fairly important horror sequel. It's the first horror sequel that follows the typical formula of a slasher sequel. First off, you have the wacky revelation that the bad guy did somehow survive the events of the first movie. There isn't any reason why Andoheb should have been able to survive the attack by Babe. He was shot like...four times while being a foot away and then fell down a long flight of stairs! Then there's the fact that the survivors of the first film are killed over the course of this sequel to make room for the new cast of stars. That's exactly what happened in a movie like A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: Dream Master. Lastly, there's the general feel that they're not adding anything new and the sequel is just an attempt to get Kharis back on the big screen.

    My opinion of the Universal Mummy movies have changed so much with each film. Karloff's The Mummy was terribly disappointing since it was just a cheap retread of the Dracula story and the Mummy spends practically all of the movie not under wraps. With the Mummy's Hand, all of the problems were rectified and I just loved it. The Mummy's Tomb is just an uninspiring sequel that's main appeal is seeing Kharis do his thing again. Taking over the role of Kharis from Tom Tyler is Universal's Monsters GOD, Lon Chaney Jr. This film came out just a year after The Wolf Man and in the same year that he portrayed Frankenstein's Monster in Ghost of Frankenstein. So Chaney's already amongst the three biggest horror stars in the world along with Karloff and Lugosi. Funny enough, one year later, Chaney would play the role of Dracula in Count Dracula. So literally in the time span of just three years, Chaney was Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy and The Wolf Man. His portrayal of The Mummy is similar to that of Frankenstein's Monster. He's perfectly serviceable despite not being in a talking role. It's a huge improvement over his disappointing role of Dracula, but Chaney was always at his absolute best while playing the sympathetic Larry "The Wolf Man" Talbot.

    Despite being such a short movie, I felt as if they were struggling to fill up time. It's a bit odd too since the movie was only sixty minutes and the first twelve were devoted to Banning telling the story of the previous film with highlights being shown. The Mummy's Tomb is just a repeated cycle of Kharis killing a new victim every night while everyone is shocked in the morning. The film dragged on and I was getting bored the longer it went on. Had Mehemet Bey, played by Turhan Bey, been a more interesting character, it would have helped things out a lot. George Zucco as the evil asshole, Andoheb, was so entertaining in the Mummy's Hand. It's one of the better villains in Universal horror. You quickly notice that Bey can't compare with Zucco. Same thing can be said about Steve Banning's son, John and John's love interest, Isobel.

    If you enjoy mummy movies, go ahead and check out The Mummy's Tomb. It's a mindless popcorn flick for mummy fans. It's not as good as the previous entry, but you get plenty of scenes with Kharis slowly walking around like any half decent person wants to see in a mummy movie. Again, the movie is only sixty minutes long and if you've seen The Mummy's Hand, you can skip the first ten minutes. So even though it's quite average, it won't take you long at all to watch. Like a typical horror slasher sequel, enjoy it for what it is rather than focusing too much in the drop of quality from Mummy's Hand.

    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:


    ----
    Coming up next, Hammer's golden trio of Fisher, Lee and Cushing return with their own tale of a wrapped up mummy.

  14. #94
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKCJxsO1jt8



    side note, holy hell horror movie trailers used to be cornball

    Spoiler:

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  15. #95

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Grimes View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKCJxsO1jt8



    side note, holy hell horror movie trailers used to be cornball
    If you want me to review Needful things, find me a download link.

  16. #96

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #15
    Title: The Mummy
    Country: England
    Year: 1959
    Director: Terrence Fisher





    In the 1890's, a family team of archaeologists discover the ancient tomb of Princess Ananka. Little do they know that they have awoken a mummy that is destined to protect his lost love at all costs and the anger of Mehemet Bey, for daring to disturb the tomb. Three years later, the father is locked up in an insane asylum due to his brief encounter with the Mummy, Kharis, and Bey has completed his mission to bring Kharis to England to hunt down the last two members of the archaeology team. For John Banning, he must find a way to survive while also coping with Kharis' strange attraction to Banning's wife. Will Bey complete his mission of revenge or will Banning find a way to stay alive and keep his beloved wife out of the Mummy's hands?


    Released merely a year after the release of Horror of Dracula and two years with Curse of Frankenstein by director Terrence Fisher and stars Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, there's already been a pretty notable change for The Mummy compared to those two previous films. By 1959, Universal and Hammer have settled some of their differences and as a result, Hammer's The Mummy didn't need to go out of it's way to appear different from Universal's various Mummy pictures. I haven't a clue whether this is actual reason or not, but it would explain why this film had the simple title of The Mummy rather than creating a longer title like Hammer did with the start of their start to their Dracula and Dr. Frankenstein series. When you watch the movie, you even see that so many of the characters have kept their names that they used in the Universal films. You've got Kharis, Stephen and John Banning, Mehemet Bey, Isobel and even Joseph Whemple!

    In case you need a refresher, those characters were not just all from one of the Universal mummy movies. For example, while Mehemet Bey is from The Mummy's Tomb, Joseph Whemple was from the original '32 Mummy. Instead of just modeling their film after one Universal mummy movie, Hammer borrowed a little bit from The Mummy, The Mummy's Hand and The Mummy's Tomb. The end result is this nicely detailed film that works even better than The Mummy's Hand to be superior mummy film. I really loved this pick and choose aspect of the script for Hammer's Mummy. Even though Universal's '32 Mummy didn't impress me much, I liked how they brought the mummy, Imhotep, back to life with the summoning spell more than Kharis being kept alive and controlled through the usage of tana leaves like they did in the other Mummy films. At the same time, if I'm watching a mummy film, I don't want to see Boris Karloff walk around without being wrapped up in bandages. You have just a little sampling of the comedy you saw in Mummy's Hand without going too far with it. Elsewhere, you give the mummy a little more substance to the character with the love story like Universal did with Imhotep in '32 Mummy. Screenwriter, Jimmy Sangster, who also wrote Horror of Dracula and Curse of Frankenstein, nailed the script down perfectly. It's as if he watched the Universal mummy films and kept a list of what worked and what didn't work in each movie. It's no wonder these initial Hammer series movies are so fantastic. You have the great director, amazing writer and the legendary screen duo of Cushing and Lee working together each time.

    While he didn't get much of a chance to do much as Frankenstein's Monster in Curse of Frankenstein, Christopher Lee makes up for it here as Kharis, the mummy. While there is a lengthy flashback scene showing a little backstory to the character where Lee isn't all wrapped up and even gets a few lines, the real good scenes from him involves being wrapped up as the mummy. The scene where he breaks into the insane asylum to kill Stephen Banning may be a single scene that is scarier than anything in the Universal Monster Movies. With the muddy look thanks to climbing out of the swamp, Kharis tears off the metal bars and breaks through the glass as if he's a pissed off Jason Voorhees. Anyone would have been scared shitless had a character like that burst through their window. The emotion of the character is great too. Through his eyes, Kharis has three main emotions. There's the emotionless look he has when he's casually killing one of his targets. This is a look where you know he doesn't really care and he's just doing his job. Then there's his intense looking of longing when he sees Isobel, who is a dead ringer for Princess Ananka. Finally, there's the look of pure fucking hatred he has when Mehemet Bey dares to threaten the life of Isobel. Holy shitballs, now THAT'S a terrifying look. While Lee will forever be remembered most fondly as Dracula, for his Hammer days, he was a hell of a Kharis too. Poor guy paid for it though as his back went out, had a dislocated shoulder, was burned from squibs, and his knees and shins were roughed up from not being able to see the metal pipes under the swamp. Knowing what Lee went through over the course of this film only makes me appreciate his work all the more.

    One of the better changes the film had was adding an increase of bitter anger to Mehemet Bey. Unlike with Universal's Mehemet Bey in The Mummy's Tomb, Bey has a more personal reason for having Kharis go after his targets. For Bey, he feels some intense cultural and religious disrespect by the Bannings and their crew breaking into the tomb of Ananka. Things are made even worse for Bey since these aren't Egyptians. Those damn British people do not have any right to even see such sights. Late in the movie, Bey gets blood on his hands, without having any sort of regret. George Pastell, who played the role of Bey was a gigantic upgrade over Universal's Bey played by Turhan Bey. With Kharis being more sympathetic than in the Universal movies, Bey comes off as being the true villain of this movie.

    There's a lot of other enjoyable little aspects of the film. There's some character development between John and Stephen Banning. At the start of the film, Cushing's character of John had broken his leg, but his father, Stephen, had been so focus on finding the tomb of Ananka that he put off leaving to get John some proper care to set is leg back into place. As a result, three years later, John walks with a permanent limp. It's a small example of the obsession of finding glory has it's consequences. Late in the film, Cushing has his best scene in the film when he heads over to the house of Mehemet Bey to confirm that Bey is the one behind the mummy attacks. From the moment John enters the house, you know he knows Bey is the responsible party. So John spends his time getting under the skin of Bey, questioning his faith and enjoying Bey losing his temper. The best part is that none of that was even necessary since Bey was already angered when he answered the door to find John, when he was already under the impression that Kharis had killed John.

    I really can't praise Hammer's The Mummy enough. It's a movie that exceeds most of the best Universal Monster Movies and should be hailed as one of the best horror films ever made. Seriously, go watch The Mummy.

    Grade: A

    Fright in Motion:


    ----
    Coming up next, another request gets reviewed. Maybe it will be yours~!

  17. #97

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #16
    Title: The Brøken
    Country: England
    Year: 2008
    Director: Sean Ellis





    It all began on such a sweet moment. Two grown kids, and their partners, throw a surprise birthday party for their father. Everyone gets a nice scare when a large mirror breaks. However, their laughs don't last long as strange encounters begin occurring the following day. For Gina (Played by Lena Headey), she gets into a serious car accident after spotting someone who looks identical to herself. As the days pass, Gina begins to suspect that her boyfriend and even her family are not the people who they claim to be. Has something happened to Gina's family or is it all just an effect of Gina's car accident?


    When it comes to horror, you typically run into one of two types of movies. Most of the horrors are simply an attempt to create a fun experience. Maybe the acting isn't so hot, the script is filled with cliches and it's only redeemable qualities are some fun kills, tons of blood and boobs. While rarer, there are some horror films that are an attempt at creating a quality film. The Broken happens to be an example of just that. The pace is pretty slow, not a whole lot happens and it mostly plays out like a psychological thriller. I have little doubt that some viewers will watch the movie and be completely bored, personally, I feel as if it did a fantastic job at creating a terrifying film.

    With so few kills, what makes the film work is the atmosphere. Throughout the film, you feel uneasy, as if something can happen at any moment. This despite the fact that the film has so few scare scenes that there isn't much of a reason to expect something big to happen. It's a mystery and one that you feel the need to keep watching to find out what's truly happening. Yet, this slow pace and little action only heightens the typical scare scenes that occur in horror. The one main death in the film was shocking due to how over the top and gory it was. It's not the type of death scene you'd expect in The Broken. It's like watching the Wizard of Oz and in the middle of it, there's a quick scene with the flying monkeys giving Dorothy a gang bang. Love the brutal nature of the kill and it's one of the more fun ones I can remember from the 2000's. There's another scene with a cheap jump scare, but it's not what you expect and causes you to tense up for the rest of the film, thinking that something like that will happen again. The suspense of the film is pretty damn great.

    While watching the film, one of the first films I compared it to is Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Yet, that's more alien related rather than being a doppelganger. For a potential inspiration for this movie, it may come from the doppelganger based story of The Twilight Zone's "Mirror Image". In that episode, which you can find on Netflix, a woman began experiencing some weird events while waiting at a bus station. Everyone around her keeps claiming that they've interacted with her, despite her not remembering. As the episode goes on, she realizes that her doppelganger has come after her. When comparing The Broken and Mirror Image, The Broken's biggest positive over Mirror Image is that it's far scarier. Everything was just more suspenseful and you even got some violent moments. On the other hand, Mirror Image did a better job at explaining the concept of doppelgangers. By the end, you knew exactly what was going on, what the goal of the doppelganger was and why they're so dangerous. In The Broken, none of the mirror people doppelgangers are given any lengthy explanation. Two similar stories about doppelgangers, but with highlights being different.

    I don't know how popular The Broken was. It received a minor amount of attention thanks to being selected to be involved in the third year of the After Dark Horror Fest. It happens to be the year I'm least familiar with. I'd suggest giving it a chance though if you can find a copy. It stars Game of Thrones' Lena Headey, so you know you can rely on her stellar acting. Richard Jenkins, from a million billion different films, has a lengthy role as Headey's father. The scene with him in the public restroom is a killer scene for suspense. Once it's done, there's still a lot to weigh on to try and figure everything out. If they really wanted to, the film left room for a sequel with the doppelganger invasion growing larger and larger. Or they can keep it a solo film that all began because of the seven years of bad luck one attains when you break a mirror. There's plenty more I could discuss about the film, but then we'd get into the really heavy spoilers which eliminates the appeal of big twist of the film.

    Grade: B

    Fright in Motion:


    ----
    Coming up next, Jim celebrates his birthday by reminiscing about one of his oldest horror loves. Reader, beware, you're in for a scare!

  18. #98
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    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    One of the things I think helped me really enjoy The Broken, was it's lack of dialogue, too often it feels like things get too wordy, whereas this film does a lot of talking through the settings and actions of it's characters. I also totally agree that it will be far too slow for most people.

    Spoiler:

    Even though it was kind of obvious the closer you got to the end, I still felt like the ending just made the movie that much better because it gives it a great sense of rewatchability


    yay jim reviewed my movie, and shares a somewhat similar opinion on it~!!

  19. #99

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan Superman View Post
    One of the things I think helped me really enjoy The Broken, was it's lack of dialogue, too often it feels like things get too wordy, whereas this film does a lot of talking through the settings and actions of it's characters. I also totally agree that it will be far too slow for most people.
    Yeah, with lack of action and dialog for the majority of the film, it's mostly just people going about their business while they begin to get the impression that something just isn't...right.

    I do think it helps that it was only ninety minutes instead of trying to drag it to two hours or longer.

    Spoiler:

    Even though it was kind of obvious the closer you got to the end, I still felt like the ending just made the movie that much better because it gives it a great sense of rewatchability
    I was beginning to suspect it as the film went on, but that final big moment could have been done many different ways with any number of revelation being made.

  20. #100

    Re: Fright Fest 6: The Series That Refuses to Die

    Day #17
    Title: Goosebumps
    Country: United States
    Years: 1995-1998
    Director: Various



    Being born in October of 1986, the 1990's encompassed my entire childhood after the lame baby/toddler years, but before the teen years. Back in those simple days, my obsession with horror hadn't begun, but it's not as if there wasn't anything there. For anyone who are like me and had their childhood in the 90's, there were two main sources for horror for children. On TV, there was the classic Nickelodeon show, Are You Afraid of the Dark? With a ton of guest starts that would end up becoming minor stars, this show about the Midnight Society and their weekly ghost stories was the regular Saturday tradition. For lovers of books or for anyone forced to read a book in school, there was Goosebumps written by R.L. Stine. This long series of books weren't anything overly complicated. They were simply every possible horror story or cliche that Stine could think of, toned down so that they would be appropriate for children. To say Goosebumps was popular amongst children would be an understatement. To put it bluntly, if you didn't have some Goosebumps books, you were a little bitch.

    I had a pretty decent collection of Goosebumps books during those years. My favorite happened to be the Haunted Mask series. Since it's been years since I've held a Goosebumps book, I struggle with remembering too many details. Yet, the one cover I distinctly still remember is for The Haunted Mask 2. It's the colors, the awesome looking mask, it's everything. As the popularity rose, Goosebumps eventually landed itself a nice little TV show on Fox with videos then being released to your favorite VHS store. I know I had a few of those, although not nearly as many as the books, but the one I distinctly remember owning was The Haunted Mask 1. So for this special birthday review of a childhood favorite of the Goosebumps TV show, it only makes sense to take a look at the Haunted Mask TV episodes.

    Both novels received a beefed up two parters to fully tell their stories, making both Haunted Mask stories to take place over four episodes. The basic background story is this, a mysterious shopkeeper has some sort of unknown facial damage. We never get to see what his face looks like, but he hints that it's really bad. As a result, he began making masks to cover his face. It's a bit like in the House of Wax remake in that respect. Yet, despite his face now looking okay, he was still ugly on the outside. That ugliness was absorbed into the mask until the mask too looked disfigured and frightening. At that point, the mask would gain life. Once that happened, the shopkeeper would ditch the mask and make himself a new one until the same thing would happen yet again. In both stories of the Haunted Mask, a kid gains control of one of the living masks that the shopkeeper created. Wearing the mask changes the kids and if they dare to put the mask on three times, it will forever be stuck on their head, becoming their new skin. With that, let's look at the The Haunted Mask 1.


    The Haunted Mask
    Season 1, Episode 1-2

    Carly Beth is a typical kid with one increasingly problematic problem - she's scared shitless of everything. It doesn't help matters that a couple of her friends, Chuck and Steve, enjoy tormenting her, finding new ways to scare her on a daily basis. Fed up with her squeaky clean image, Carly Beth sets out to make Halloween be the day that she does the scaring instead of Chuck and Steve. Finding a tiny little shop with handmade masks, she finds the perfect one that will scare her friends. The only problem is that the shopkeeper isn't keen to selling it to Carly Beth. After stealing/throwing thirty dollars at the gentleman, Carly Beth now has the mask in her possession or is it possibly the other way around. For the rest of Halloween, Carly Beth will learn that she shouldn't have ever tried to change herself and now it may not be within her control over ever removing the hideous mask.

    When you watch Goosebumps as an adult, it can be a pretty hilarious experience because everything is so damn cheesy. Hey, enjoyment is enjoyment, even if it's unintentional that you're being entertained in such a way. The interactions that Carly Beth has with others while wearing the mask is chuckle worthy. Her best friend, Sabrina, who apparently has yet to find a Halloween costume that people can guess what she's supposed to be easily, won't shut up about trying to get Carly Beth to remove the mask because it's creeping her out too much. Chill out, Sabs. Let your friend have some fun. Then there's a mother passing out candy with her two kids. When her bratty daughter mentions that Carly Beth's mask scares her, Carly Beth has a little fun and tries scaring her a bit. It's completely harmless. Yet, the mother actually threatened to call the cops!

    If there's a flaw to the story, which granted, it's a story for children, so you have to expect there to be some weaknesses when you watch it through the eyes of an adult, it's the lack of danger. When Carly Beth is wearing the mask, I don't sense that she's evil or anything dangerous. If anything, I think she's better off with the mask on. Without the mask, she was a bit of a pathetic girl that was afraid of her own shadow, wouldn't stand up for herself and did some pretty horrible things. The worst thing had to be when she ripped apart the duck costume that her mom made her for Halloween. Hey kid, I know you're upset about things, but your mom probably spent hours on that geeky costume! She wasn't under the influence of the mask when she initially stole the mask. It doesn't matter that she gave the shopkeeper some money, it wasn't for sale and even if it was, we don't know if the money would be enough to cover it. It's a fun little episode though thanks to Carly Beth's overacting, a gnarly looking mask and Steve and Chuck doing their best impressions of Randy Orton's childhood pranks by putting live worms in Carly Beth's sandwich. They totally seem like the type that would end up pranking Carly Beth a decade from now by shitting in her purse.


    The Haunted Mask II
    Season 2, Episode 11-12

    After the near life altering events of the previous year's Halloween, Carly Beth is now a changed girl, being far braver and less prone to being scared of every single thing in existence. Feeling downtrodden, Steve wants to find a scary costume this year for Halloween to try and regain his spot of being Carly Beth's main tormentor. Along with his useless buddy, Chuck, Steve ends up at the same little store that Carly Beth originally got her mask from. Unknown to Steve or even Carly Beth, the shopkeeper had lost control of his masks. With Carly Beth's old mask regaining power thanks to Halloween, it forced itself back over the head of it's original master, allowing for a new old man mask to be made from the shopkeeper's latest mask that he was wearing. So in the deserted little shop, Steven enters through the back and after rummaging through some boxes, eventually finds the newest mask of the old man. History is about to repeat itself as Steve will learn why stealing a mask is never a good idea and for Carly Beth, she'll learn that her previous problems with her old mask is about to begin yet again. Can the kids survive yet again or will the stronger than ever evil mask keep Steve in his control and gain control over Carly Beth again?

    The big strength of The Haunted Mask 2 is that it corrects the flaw of the first story. Once Steve put on the mask, he was a bit of a dickbag. He stole candy from kids, said some hurtful things to his lame friend Chuck (How do you even have a friend, Chuck?) and smashed pumpkins against people's front doors. As the old man mask gains more and more control over him by turning him into an old person, he meets up with Carly Beth's old mask (Now being worn by the shopkeeper, who is merely a physical vessel for the mask) and actually agrees to bring the evil mask the sculpture of Carly Beth's head that her mom made, that played a significant role in Carly Beth surviving last Halloween. It's a selfish move, knowing that he was sacrificing Carly Beth's safety for his own. By the end of the episode, Steve does obviously redeem himself, but they at least got over the fact that these masks were truly evil and had to be stopped.

    The episode as a whole was just better than The Haunted Mask 1. You have some character development with learning more about Steve, Carly Beth having a new personality thanks to her prior experience with the evil mask keeping her from ever being scared of minor things again. It's obviously just as hokey as the previous episode, but the writers managed to add more variety to the episode. I particularly like that it wasn't just the first episode practically remade. Steve's experience under the mask was different from Carly Beth's. The longer he wore the mask, the more difficult everything became for him, which caused him to be willing to temporarily work with the evil mask.

    If you're like me and some of your childhood was centered around Goosebumps or you'll like to just get a small taste of it, Netflix currently has the entire series uploaded, however; it will be removed on November 5th.

    Frights in Motions:


    ----
    Coming up next, back to usual reviews with a tale of a new shop that offers your most desirable of items.
    Last edited by Jim; 10-30-2014 at 05:01 PM.

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