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Thread: Grim Reviews Random Games

  1. #61
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Silent Hill



    Console: Sony PlayStation

    Released: January 31, 1999

    Developer:
    Konami

    Plot: Harry Mason is driving with his daughter in the dead of night towards the quiet town of Silent Hill; suddenly, he swerves to avoid hitting a girl, crashing violently and knocking himself unconscious. When he awakens, his daughter, Cheryl, is missing. A mysterious fog and out-of-season snow belays the town, and Harry is alone. He must now find his Cheryl, and uncover what the hell is going on. 7/10



    Gameplay: Borrowing several gameplay elements from Resident Evil (which came out about 3 years earlier). For the most part, Silent Hill plays like a third person behind-the-person camera tank control; there are also a lot of areas that have camera angles that help create a very claustrophobic experience. Harry Mason is a pretty awkward character to control, however. Moving around feels wonky, though I feel that's totally on purpose.

    To me, fighting is one of the biggest problems I have with the original game. I can barely beat most opponents without taking massive damage, and that's actually on purpose. Each enemy is designed to be able to kill you if you fuck up. Hell, the first enemies you fight "kill" you (in reality just knock you unconscious in a great segment just to move the game forward). The fights are meant to be something of a last resort for Silent Hill. Instead, running and leaving the room is one of your best options (except for those damn dogs). Harry is incredibly weak and therefore cannot deal a lot of damage; he's also incredibly inaccurate with his swings and shots.

    The main driving point of this game is the horror aspect, which (if any of you blokes remember) I stated was my scariest game of all time. Seriously, even though it's come out 17 years ago, its horror has aged incredibly well (the control scheme unfortunately, has not). Playing off the uncanny valley and our psychological fears of the unknown, Silent Hill employs visual and audio scares to near perfection (almost like Silent Hill 2, which actually does this better). The only way to know if something is nearby waiting to kill you, you listen to static on a radio. That's pretty smart, because static is pretty unusual and already uncanny in a normal setting. Here, it plays off of a psychological fear that we might hear a voice in that static (which lets be honest, I hope that never happens to me in the real world).

    On the technical side of things (meaning menus and shit) Harry (much like Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield in Resident Evil 1) doesn't have a visible health marker. Instead, when Harry's health is low enough, the PS controller starts to rumble to a heartbeat rhythm; you can also check his health through one of the menus. Silent Hill is also one of the few Survival Horror games to not have a HUD, which makes exploring the menus all the more important.

    Overall, compared to Fatal Frame or Resident Evil, I'd have to say I'd rather play the other two, since the gameplay mechanics were... "better implemented" if that means anything. That's not to say that Silent Hill is an inferior game, it's more of a preference I have. The game is a mixed bag to me, but more positive than not. 7/10



    Visuals: When it comes to visuals, Silent Hill is one of the very best on the original PlayStation, creating some genuinely horrific imagery, and not only that still looks pretty impressive, despite being 17 years old. I mean, I really don't know how to describe just how awesome the games look, I guess giving some screenshots would help.





    A lot of the scenes are very scary, and it's all thanks to the visuals, which still look amazing today, despite being slightly aged.

    I almost forgot to mention how fantastic the cutscenes look. They still look pretty good, considering PS1 graphics, and that's a major plus. 9/10

    Audio: The best thing about Silent Hill, by far (aside from the spooks and horror aspect). From that legendary opening music, to the despondent and discordant pieces of bangs and booms and screeches, it makes the game. Some of my favorite pieces are "Silent Hill", "Claw Finger", and "Not Tomorrow 1". It has some legendary pieces to its name, and the rest of the ambience sets the atmosphere almost perfectly. Considering my background as a Resident Evil fanboy, that's saying something when I say that Silent Hill 1 had much much better music than ole' ResEvil 1. 10/10





    Final Thoughts:
    Although it has its problems, Silent Hill is an experience like no other. It still remains one of the scariest games I've ever played, and there are times where I still cannot get through the game without being properly frightened. It's worth having and owning, and perhaps one of the best PlayStation games of all time, behind perhaps Metal Gear and Resident Evil 2 & 3.

    Final Grade: 8/10

    (Hey hey hey, so, this was originally supposed to be planned for early June, but... stuff happened. However, this is just the beginning of what I like to call "Grim's Summer of Horror". I'll hopefully be doing a lot more reviews in the coming weeks, so yeah.)

    Next Time: Undying
    Last edited by Grim; 02-05-2018 at 09:03 AM.
    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
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  2. #62
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Clive Barker's Undying



    Console: Windows & OS X
    Released: February 21, 2001 (NA)
    March 16, 2001 (EU)
    Developer: EA Los Angeles

    Story: Patrick Galloway, a renowned occult hunter returns to Ireland to see a sick war friend, Jeremiah Covenent, whom had sought out Patrick after strange events began plaguing his family after the Great War. Upon arrival to the Covenent manor, Galloway learns that it has been left mostly deserted by staff (though a few still remain). Jeremiah, ill from an unknown disease, explains that his family has been cursed by ancient spirits accidentally awoken during his childhood. His brothers and sisters are dead, and now haunt him, and begs of Jeremiah to deal with them before his demise. Unfortunately, that will prove to be difficult, with time travel, ghosts, monsters, and a certain evil wizard tailing him, Galloway is in for a nightmare. 8/10



    Gameplay: I'd just like to say how happy I am to finally be getting around to this game. It's such an underrated classic I can't believe people don't throw it around more when compiling great horror game lists. Undying is a first person shooter, and for PC plays exactly as it should. The mouse looks around and also shoots, and WASD is the standard movement procedure. The controls are not bad at all, very fluid, though some of the other buttons require getting used to, but I prefer to not spoil them and let you go have fun figuring out what the keyboard buttons do.

    The game's main gimmick is the use of a gun and magic. One hand controls weapons, and the other is used for magic and the like. There's an assortment of magic, such as the scrye which allows you to see more than meets the eye, and ectoplasm, shooting projectiles!!! The weapons you get are pretty cool too, you start out with a handgun, and eventually you get a god damn scythe (that has both positives and negatives, unfortunately). You've got mana to look out for too, which depletes when you use magic (duh).

    I'd also like to mention that some cutscenes stop movement of the character, I guess to allow the story to be told, and yeah, it can be annoying sometimes, but I really don't mind it. It could be Metal Gear Solid 2... Oh, and there's traditional, skip-able cutscenes as well; Goodie! Another plus is when you die, you get a cool custom death scene depending on the type of enemy that kills ya! Overall, it's this type of play style I enjoy out of a game, giving a lot of freedom to the player, but also restricting him just enough to keep him focused... for a moment. Yeah, I will say this, explore the world you've been given. It's pretty gorgeous, truth be told. 9/10



    Visuals: Mind you, this happens to be pre-Resident Evil graphics, but even then, they look pretty good. Considering this is the Unreal Engine 1, it looks magnificent. Environments are great, characters are identifiable, and enemies are nicely animated. This game's visuals are so nice that they actually inspire exploration to see everything you can find. Some of the enemies look terribly menacing, as well. 8/10

    Sound: Pretty good sound effects, truth be told. Great music (when it plays), and a nice ambience. Overall, it works quite a bit for the game and is simple, and nice. It is a great ambience. Most of the time, music doesn't play, but it's mostly sound effects and ambient noise, which helps set the tone. Overall, while it's not necessarily memorable, it works for the most part. 7/10



    Final Thoughts: Undying is an underrated gem that never got the recognition it deserved. It should definitely be worth playing once or twice. If any of you are lucky to get this one cheap, I commend you for picking up a great rare game.

    Final Grade: 8/10



    Next Time:

    Ib
    Last edited by Grim; 02-05-2018 at 08:58 AM.
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  3. #63
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Ib



    Console: Windows
    Released: February 27, 2012
    Developer: Kouri

    Plot: Ib, a nine year old girl, is taken to the local art museum by her parents to examine the works of recently deceased artist, Guertena Weiss. With her parents permission, she wanders off on her own, and is distracted by one of the more abstract works of arts by Guertena. While she's trying to understand the painting, a power outage suddenly occurs in the museum, causing an abrupt evacuation. Ib is accidentally left behind as the doors lock. By herself, some strange paint splatters seem to lead her to a large painting of the deep sea. She is able to step into the painting, entering an alien world of Guertena's works. There, she meets an young man named Garry, and a girl roughly the same age as Ib. Together, they must venture through this strange world and find a way to escape. Along the way, they'll learn more about themselves, and who they are. 8/10



    Gameplay: Ib is a top down horror adventure game, much like Misao and Mad Father (which I've reviewed before), but unlike the other two, this is much much longer and more puzzle oriented. The game is more about the journey, and not the destination, but is also a great character study and a very good psychological horror game. First off, the game controls are simple to understand, with the WASD keys moving Ib and the other characters, and the space bar your general action button. Your health bar is also pretty clever; it's represented by a rose, that wilts as you take more damage. You can replenish your health with vases; there are two types: ones that are one-time use, and endless vases. There's also plenty of save points, so you can work at your own pace without worrying about fucking up too much.

    The game's biggest attraction has to be the horror aspect, which is played very well. It utilizes some great psychological scares, along with some classic jump-scares and fake out. You'll probably (I hope) not be screaming in terror, but I think you'll appreciate the creep factor on display. It's a properly creepy game, which is a big plus in my book. I'd much rather be creeped out and have the game build tension than flat out be terrified.

    As the story unfolds, you get the chance to learn more about the characters you're going to meet. There are prompts which allow you to choose what to say, and It actually drives the story forward and can have long-reaching implications for the rest of the game. Yes, there are multiple endings, which add so much replayability to the game. All the endings, much like Clock Tower, depend on you meeting certain conditions throughout the game.

    Another thing of note is one of the big gameplay mechanics is switching between characters during a segment where the group gets split up. Much like the train segment of Resident Evil 0, the characters are helping each other out even though they aren't necessarily together. It's a nice break from the usual puzzles, and becomes more multi-layered, giving this game a lot more credit. It certainly gives more variety than many of its partners, and is essentially like Corpse Party. Overall, the game is basic RPG maker horror games, with a great story, likeable characters, good psychological horror, and enough gameplay elements to keep you interested all the way through. 9/10



    Visuals: The game looks very much like the original Corpse Party in graphics only, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. It looks like a throwback to old DOS games, and I like it a lot. The characters are well designed (Ib looks seriously adorable), the monsters look truthfully menacing, and the environment is so varied it looks great. There's a lot of dark blues, and browns to accentuate darkness, with red being the usual color for something scary. It mixes dark colors with bright and vibrant ones to just create such a beautiful yet frightening scene that you simply can't look away. The paintings are also really nicely drawn, and you'd just like to look at them and observe them. Simply stated, the game is lovely, and scary at the same time. 9/10



    Audio: The music in this game is really nice, they help set the tone and scene for whatever is happening and I adore the "All Alone" theme for one of the endings. There's also one of the wandering around themes I like. The sound effects aren't bad either, they're really nice too. Some strange sounds that'll get you wondering what the hell it is. Classic horror gaming 101, build tension with sound effects. It works best inside the game and it is really creepy when done right, which the game nails down. 9/10



    Final Thoughts: Ib is a really good game. I underestimated the game when I first played it and came out loving it a lot. On the plus side for anyone looking to give it a try, it's absolutely free. Anyone who liked Misao or Mad Father would definitely enjoy this one.

    Final Grade: 9/10
    Next Time:

    We're going to run and gun it, baby.
    Last edited by Grim; 02-05-2018 at 09:09 AM.
    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
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  4. #64
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Zombies Ate My Neighbors (Zombies (PAL))



    Console: Super Nintendo
    Sega Genesis/Mega Drive
    Released: July 19, 1993
    Developer: LucasArts



    Plot: Monsters have risen up and are terrorizing the neighborhood, thanks to local mad scientist Dr. Tongue. Having witnessed an attack by one of the monsters, teenage friends Zeke and Julie arm their water pistols and prepare to save the neighborhood. Along the way, they'll gain bazookas, soda cans, Popsicles, weed whackers and crosses to do battle with this cornucopia of death, including: giant ants, evil dolls, vampires, mummies, and yes, even zombies. 7/10

    Gameplay: Zombies Ate My Neighbors is a top down shoot em' up where you traverse the map and collect your neighbors before the monsters do. The game has some fantastic gameplay elements that are numerous throughout the game, but I'd like to think the biggest advantage this game has is cheap b-horror charm. It is fucking awesome and in my top 10 favorite games of all time (#2 in fact)!

    The first thing I should talk about is the main control system; they're actually fairly simple to learn, and I'll be going by the SNES control scheme (if you have the Genesis/ Mega Drive version, you've got the inferior one). The Y button uses weapons you have selected, and the X button uses items you have. B cycles through weapons, and A cycles through items. The L & R buttons open up a mini map that vaguely tells you where your neighborly fellows happen to be. The big complaint I hear people have with this control scheme is the fact you can't cycle backwards. I actually don't have a problem with this, since it's really a minor thing, but I do understand; you receive a huge satchel of weaponry, and cycling through them for a favored weapon type takes some time, but as long as you keep a level head, you'll deal with it and not get hurt in the process.

    You can actually play a two player game, which is really a lot of fun. Unfortunately, there are a few too many problems to really recommend going for the long haul with it. For one thing, no split screen; that's right, you have to share the screen the entire game, but the maps give a lot of room for you to not have to worry about that. Secondly, you both would be getting so few items and ammo, since you do not share them, and for the long haul, that becomes a key problem after level 30, where resources become scarce very quickly, and enemies become much tougher. That doesn't mean multiplayer games can't be successful, just that they may not last until the very end.



    As for the enemies, there are so many monsters in this game from classic and some modern horror that it is really amazing. This game is an all out homage to horror and the B-movies we all know and love. Movies like Texas Chainsaw Massacre/ Friday the 13th, Child's Play, The Blob, Tremors, Them!, and even Honey, I Blew up the Kid (of all movies) are a part of the homage, with enemies reflecting that. Even their niches are present and accounted for. For example, a werewolf will die instantly if you throw silverware at it, the same happens for Creatures of the Black Lagoon. The most annoying enemies in this game has to be the spiders on many of the office levels; they're way too damn fast and can do a ton of damage if you don't kill 'em quick enough.

    Your neighbors are most likely the most important thing in the game. Your objective is to save all of them, and failing to even rescue one in a level results in instant game over, regardless the lives you have. All of them are pretty colorful characters and are worth an assortment of points. You know that teach who keeps givin' you an F? He's worth 50 points. What a dick. There's usually 10 in a level you have to find, and as they die, there becomes less and less each level. Fortunately, since the game works with a point system, you'll be able to earn those victims back in due time.

    The weapons and items are all really hilarious, as is the rest of the game (campy homage and all). Just a few of the items you get are medikits, Pandora's box, red & blue potions, and even decoy clowns! The biggest gamble for items happen to be the mystery potion; the various effects include healing, hurting, speed boost, and the dreaded Hyde Effect (turning evil and killing neighbors). Some of the weapons include Popsicles, footballs, tomatoes, fire extinguishers, and much much more.

    I could go all day on the gameplay, but simply put, running around killing the monsters and saving neighbors in castles, neighborhoods, beaches, caves, pyramids and the like is just too much fun. Great gameplay and wonderful tongue-in-cheek humor. 8/10



    Visuals: Man oh man. The visuals in this game, whilst not perfect, are certainly great, even by SNES standards. Enemies are colorful and spooky, and the settings are gorgeous. You travel from regular places such as the neighborhood, offices, and shopping centers, all the way to pyramids, castles and even football fields (I also forgot to mention Hell itself)! The characters, and neighbors are nicely drawn and look really good. There's not much to say other than the Genesis and SNES versions have slight presentation differences, but despite its censored game over screen I'll still take the SNES version. I should also mention a small detail for you Europeans reading. The chainsaw maniacs in the game are changed to lumberjacks due to heavier censorship... I guess. So overall, these are cartoonish yet spooky visuals worth looking at if you're gonna be playing for 6 hours (like me). 9/10

    Audio: Even better than the visuals is the music! There are so many memorable tunes in this game. It's honestly one of my favorite soundtracks on the SNES just for its kick-ass tunes. Some of my favorite tunes have to be "Mars Needs Cheerleaders" or "No Assembly Required". I totally recommend giving the music a listen to. It's all perfect for your running and gunning experience. I should also mention the spooky monster sound effects in the game, which are also great. Evil Dolls laugh wildly, and Vampires give that gutteral laugh, and the death explosion is AMAZIIIING! Thank you Joe McDermott for this wonderful gift. 10/10



    Final Thoughts: Zombies Ate My Neighbors is a game that is so underrated it's not even funny. If anybody here (which means most of you) is a great fan of horror movies, you'll love this game, like I do. Worth getting for Virtual Console if anybody here owns a Wii or Wii U.

    Final Grade: 8.5/10

    Next Time:

    Are you alone in the dark?
    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
    I did no more than you let me do."

    - The Hangman, Maurice Ogden

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  5. #65
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Alone In The Dark



    Developer:
    Infogrames
    Released: 1992
    Console: DOS, 3DO

    Plot: Jeremy Hartwood, noted artist and owner of the infamous Louisianian Derceto Manor, has committed suicide by hanging. Whilst suspicious, the police close the case quickly and it is rapidly forgotten. Many people believe the suicide to have been due to the purported "hauntings" of the mansion. Edward Carnby, a tough and down-on-his-luck private investigator is hired to retrieve a piano from the mansion for an antique dealer. At the same time, Hartwood's niece, Emily, goes to the mansion in search of a potential note left by Jeremy to explain his suicide. Either one arrives and is immediately trapped inside Derceto before ascending to the loft, where the piano is located. They must now find a way to escape the mansion whilst also searching for the answers to the mystery of Derceto. 8/10



    Gameplay: Alone In The Dark is the original third person survival horror game and almost singlehandily the influence for Resident Evil four years later (I say "almost", it would be complete were it not for Sweet Home (the entire reason Resident Evil was made in the first place) from three years before and of course Clock Tower: First Fear, that had maybe a modicum of influence). Playing very much like Resident Evil, Alone in the Dark utilized the divisive tank controls that worked like their namesake. Pushing the forward key moves your character forward irregardless the direction of either the camera and Carnby/Emily. The left and right keys change the direction of the character you control, be that Edward or Emily.

    Many of the conventions of the survival horror genre were birthed from Alone In The Dark; conventions such as: limited inventory space, an array of different puzzles, very little health and health items, instant kill traps, and of course staggeringly antiquated combat. Yes, I will admit, playing it again has been both a joy and a disappointment; the game is definitely innovative and there are still gameplay elements that are fun, but one of them is not the combat, which is tricky to control at first. Holding space while using the fight mode allows you to get in your fisticuffs stance (or ready to fight with whatever weapon you have), pressing any of the direction keys allows for an attack. Once you get into a rhythm, however, it isn't so bad; the problem lies in once an enemy hits you, they can just keep wailing on you whilst you try to recover, leading to an inevitably quick death. It's stuff like that that makes the game arbitrarily difficult. The puzzles on the other hand are actually not too bad to figure out, and they're quick and help move the game along. The main story of the game is mostly told, much like Resident Evil, through manuscripts and memos left scattered throughout the house. Some of these notes are pretty provocative and intense, even by today's standards, very much written in line with the Cthulhu Mythos, the universe in which this game is set.



    Along with the limited inventory space, there is a way to rid yourself of items. Once a key or other items have been used, you do not automatically get rid of them. You have the ability to drop or throw them, however. Also in line with Resident Evil, you can push large items. There is one last segment that requires, of all things, platforming. You read that right, there's a segment that requires you to jump between several platforms, and if you miss, you land in a lagoon below. It's absolutely terrible and there was no reason for it to even be in the game, but alas, there it is. Another final thing would be all the instant kill traps; not even three rooms into the game and there is a trap that will kill you instantly if you don't notice it, and that is all over the game. Is it frustrating sometimes? Yeah, it is, but as long as you're careful and observant, you shouldn't die; remember, Resident Evil has them too.

    My biggest complaint overall would have to be how poorly the game has aged, which is no surprise. Unlike Diablo, however, this game is still greatly playable and a ton of fun despite not aging so well. It could take some time to get used to the controls and the menu, but if you're keen for old school and innovative gameplay, this is right up your alley. The minor problems set it back a bit, however, with combat being ridiculously hard, a bad platforming segment, and some instant kill traps that are, for better or worse, cheap. 6/10



    Visuals: Here's where Alone In The Dark ends up dropping the ball, with those visuals not aging as well as one would expect. For 1992, these are some brand-spanking new looks and absolutely innovative for its time. However, even playing ten years ago, it didn't look so well. Carnby and Emily look goofy and the enemies look more like geeks than freaks, to be honest. This was the failing of many games that attempted 3D in this time period; there was almost a guarantee that the graphics would improve with time. As bias as it would sound, sprites just seemed to age much better. Ultimately, you'll be looking at a lot of green and quite a bit of putrid brown when all is said and done. The palette for Alone In The Dark does not differentiate that far, other than maybe some purples thrown in there as well. It is not visually stimulating, but for a horror game, the atmosphere is on point. It's not meant to look pleasant and that's what they're going for. I for one enjoy the atmosphere, but not exactly the graphics. 5/10

    Audio: The audio in this game is actually pretty good. There are some spooky noises and some spot on sound effects for the mansion and monsters. Not only that, this actually has some pretty good voice work, I especially like Carnby's voice. A lot of the voices come from the books and papers you find, and they help add to the maddening atmosphere of a Cthulhu Mythos type game.

    The music is also pretty good, although there are a limited amount of songs and they tend to cut in and out a lot of the time. The main music is pretty atmospheric and helps add to the game, the other music also work considering how short and repetitive they can get though. Overall, the audio quality for Alone In The Dark is "meh", good sound effects and voiceover is marred by a lacking soundtrack. 7/10




    Final Thoughts: An innovative game that is still somewhat playable, but marred by it's pratfalls. I, however, would still argue that it is a must play for anyone looking to find the origins of the Survival Horror game and aren't afraid to get your hands dirty with some hard combat and older looking 3D perspectives. The trilogy is currently purchaseable on GOG.com, so go ahead and purchase them post-haste, the first game is well worth it. The other two are just a neat bonus.

    Final Grade: 6.5/10

    Next Time:

    The Next Step in Survival Horror!

    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
    I did no more than you let me do."

    - The Hangman, Maurice Ogden

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  6. #66
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil (BioHazard in Japan)



    Console: Sony PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Microsoft Windows

    Released: March 22, 1996 (PlayStation (JP))
    March 30, 1996 (PlayStation (NA))
    August 1, 1996 (PlayStation (PAL))
    December 6, 1996 (Microsoft Windows (JP))
    July 25, 1997 (Sega Saturn (JP))
    August 31, 1997 (Sega Saturn (NA))
    September 17, 1997 (Microsoft Windows (PAL))
    September 30, 1997 (Microsoft Windows (NA))
    October 1, 1997 (Sega Saturn (PAL))

    Director's Cut (PlayStation)

    September 25, 1997 (JP)
    September 30, 1997 (NA)
    December 10, 1997 (PAL)

    Director's Cut Dualshock Version (PlayStation)

    August 6, 1998 (JP)
    September 14, 1998 (NA)

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: July 10, 1996: Raccoon City's special forces team S.T.A.R.S. Alpha Team is combing through the Arklay Forest in search of Bravo Team, who went missing the night before. Grisly murders had been popping up all throughout the outskirts of the city, and Bravo Team had been sent in to locate the hideout of these vicious cannibal killers. Upon locating the crash landed helicopter of Bravo Team, they landed in search of survivors. Unfortunately, the helicopter was a derelict and all the equipment was missing inside. Going by foot, the team continues their search through the forest and shortly afterwards Joseph Frost is attacked and killed by a pack of dogs. The rest of the team make a beeline for the helicopter, but Brad Vickers (known as Chicken Heart to the rest of the crew), flies off without them, leaving them stranded. They manage to escape into a mysterious mansion that they happen to come across, and it is here where the real nightmare begins. 7/10



    Gameplay: Looks like I'm back to talking about Resident Evil once more! It looks like I just can't get enough of the series! The game plays in tank controls, with the forward button pushing your character in the direction he/she is facing, and of course, the left and right buttons move them into different directions. There are, again, fixed camera angles, much like the other games in the series and the game I just reviewed, Alone In The Dark. Not only that, you have two characters to choose from: Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield.

    Now, if you've read my Resident Evil REmake review, you'd know that that game was a marked improvement upon what this game set up, and it's rather obvious, but don't take that to mean I don't like this game. In fact, I love it! There are a few gameplay elements I would like to make note of, however. The first of which would be that there is no auto-aim in Resident Evil; in fact, it is only available in the Dualshock version, and in BioHazard, the Japanese version of the game. The reason behind this was financially motivated: They wanted to reap as many rent sales in North America as possible. Renting games is a banned practice in Japan and so having an auto-aim wasn't a problem over there; over here, they wanted to make it artificially more difficult so that rentals would be higher. Thus, because of this decision, the game is actually much harder than it should have been. Enemies are able to reel in massive damage to you since you cannot quickly aim their way to stop them. This leads to a lot of health item usage, and since there's really a limited amount, it puts quite a bit of pressure to try not get yourself in highly populated areas (of which there are many). Also, Hunters are the most terrifying thing in this game since they have a one hit kill attack on you if you're in yellow health or lower, making aiming a tense experience.



    Secondly, there is no difficulty option. There is only two, normal and hard mode; both of which are chosen by picking Jill or Chris, respectively. I've said before, their stories play out differently, just like REmake, so there is no real reason to talk about it here. Thirdly, the original game and its subsequent re-releases have a few marked differences. Director's Cut and DC Dualshock have different play modes to mess around with as well. DC and Dualshock have two extra modes, Arrange and Beginner. Arrange changes both the locations of items and enemies. Beginner is exactly how it sounds; it's a beginners mode that makes enemies incredibly easy to kill and doubles the amount of ammo you find. Not only that, DC and Dualshock also have brand new outfits that the characters wear at the beginning of the game, which is a neat little bonus.

    Another thing to note is the radical difference between the original PlayStation version and the Saturn and Windows version. The Sega Saturn version is perhaps one most unique of the three. It contains a whole new enemy, a re-skinned Hunter nicknamed a Tick because of its brown coloration. Not only that, with the addition of a Battle Mode, in which you kill as many enemies as you can with the weapons you're given, you have two completely unique enemies: a zombified version of Albert Wesker, and a Gold Tyrant!!! Another little feature are extra outfits for Jill and Chris. This is just more bang for your buck in what is already a pretty good game!

    In the Windows version, the censorship that the game suffered has been completely circumvented, showing the intro in complete form (and in color!), and showing the complete Kenneth death scene. The Windows version also has two exclusive weapons that the others don't have: a Mac-10 for Jill and an FN-Minimi for Chris. There are also some new unlockable outfits. The graphics in the Windows version is actually much sharper than the other games as well. Overall, I think the Saturn version is probably the best out of the trio, but if you're looking for an uncensored version with some extra stuff, the rare Windows version is for you.

    Rating these games are going to be somewhat of a challenge, so I'll simply rate them separately based on features and what not, so gameplay ratings will look something like this:

    PlayStation Original: 6/10
    Director's Cut: 7/10
    Director's Cut Dualshock: 7/10
    Sega Saturn: 8/10
    Microsoft Windows: 7/10



    Visuals: Now, the game has aged about as well as Alone In The Dark, and that is not all that well. However, I will say that the backgrounds still look somewhat presentable and some of the enemy designs still hold up. The character designs and the zombie designs however are pretty blocky and pretty bad looking in comparison. The Saturn, DC, and Dualshock versions are comparable (Saturn looks slightly more blocky), with the Windows looking slightly better, but still fairly the same. Overall the animations aren't too bad, but there are also the FMV scenes which are "neat", if that's your sort of thing. They're poorly acted, but we'll get to that in a bit. It's also incredible considering the difference between Resident Evil 1 and 2, which are like night and day. 6/10



    Audio: Here's where we get into some pretty treacherous territory. The music for the original, DC, Saturn, and Windows versions are absolutely incredible and really memorable soundtracks with great songs interspersed. The Dualshock version is a fucking dumpster fire of awful shit. It should be noted, the Dualshock version was credited as being composed by the "Japanese Beethoven" Mamura Samuragochi, whom in 2014 revealed he neither was deaf, and had written his own works of music. Essentially, the Dualshock version of Resident Evil's music was ghostwritten and credited to a fraudulant musician; if that doesn't say anything about how I feel about the music, then I have no words for you.

    And speaking of awful things, the voice acting is beyond legendary for how bad it is. It is currently in the Guinness Book of World Records for "Worst Video Game Dialogue", which is hilarious. One of the voice actors, Barry Gjerde (whom also played a character in another PlayStation classic: Clock Tower), is infamous in this game for his vocalization of Barry Burton, and the famous "Jill sandwich" line. Indeed, the voice acting is awful, but at the same time, I can't help but love it. You have to experience it for yourself if you can. So, with some great music (bar the Dualshock edition), but some hilarious acting jobs, the audio for the game could have been great, but falls short of the mark.

    Dualshock: 4/10
    Others: 8/10



    Final Thoughts: Resident Evil has many versions and all of them are varied in some way. I highly recommend looking for either the original, or the Saturn & Windows ports. Take my advice though, DO NOT BUY THE DUALSHOCK VERSION. It is easily the worst of the many ports.

    Final Grade:

    PlayStation: 7/10
    Director's Cut: 7/10
    Director's Cut Dualshock: 6/10
    Sega Saturn: 7/10
    Microsoft Windows: 7/10

    Next Time:

    Another Version!?

    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
    I did no more than you let me do."

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  7. #67
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil: Deadly Silence (BioHazard: Deadly Silence in Japan)



    Console: Nintendo DS

    Released: January 19, 2006 (JP)
    February 7, 2006 (NA)
    March 30, 2006 (PAL)

    Developer: Capcom

    Nickname: Resident Evil DS

    Plot July 10, 1996: Raccoon City's special forces team S.T.A.R.S. Alpha Team is combing through the Arklay Forest in search of Bravo Team, who went missing the night before. Grisly murders had been popping up all throughout the outskirts of the city, and Bravo Team had been sent in to locate the hideout of these vicious cannibal killers. Upon locating the crash landed helicopter of Bravo Team, they landed in search of survivors. Unfortunately, the helicopter was a derelict and all the equipment was missing inside. Going by foot, the team continues their search through the forest and shortly afterwards Joseph Frost is attacked and killed by a pack of dogs. The rest of the team make a beeline for the helicopter, but Brad Vickers (known as Chicken Heart to the rest of the crew), flies off without them, leaving them stranded. They manage to escape into a mysterious mansion that they happen to come across, and it is here where the real nightmare begins. 7/10



    Gameplay: There's a very specific reason I decided to review Resident Evil DS separately from the others, and that has mostly to do with the fact that it's probably the version of the original Resident Evil to get. This portable port of the game has included several new nuances and several new modes that make this almost ridiculous. It's a port that didn't need to happen, but I'm certainly glad it exists. The first gameplay element is the modernisation of the controls (including two control schemes in the options menu) and adding little features; the first of which is the official inclusion of a 180 degree turn, which was first introduced in Resident Evil 3: Nemesis. The second of which is the permanent mapping of the knife to the L-button; this means you'll no longer have the knife taking up an inventory space and you'll have it on hand when things get dicey! There's also a tactical reload from Resident Evil 4 in there as well. Finally, and this is probably the most important update, you can skip both door animations and cutscenes. This allows to game to move along quickly and speeds things up a bit. I know it's minor, but being able to skip the door animations is probably the best thing they could have given us! The top screen of the DS also contains a map screen, an indicator for how much ammo you have left in your weapon, and the screen will also flash color depending on your health! The little additions to the gameplay really make this much better than the rest.

    For Resident Evil DS, there are two modes to the main game: Classic and Rebirth. Classic is exactly as it sounds; it is the original game with original enemy and item placements. Rebirth mode, on the other hand, utilizes the DS's capabilities and includes neat little "Knife Battle" segment, a first person minigame in which you use the stylus to swipe or stab the knife at oncoming enemies. It occurs quite a bit, but it is fun and a good way to get some more ammo or health items if needed. Rebirth also has brand new puzzles using the touch screen (and one using the microphone), as well as different enemy placements. As an aside, headshots are far more common on zombies in this mode than the original, for whatever reason. I like both modes, and Rebirth Mode is somewhat more difficult thanks to the addition of more enemies, so think of it as a neat bonus!



    There are also two more modes in Resident Evil DS! There is, of all things, a multiplayer mode, where if you have a bunch of friends who also have a copy of the game, you can play local multiplayer in two types: Cooperative and Competitive. Cooperative mode is where the players work together as members of S.T.A.R.S. (the characters are unlockable through playing the main game) to solve puzzles and help escape the mansion. Competitive allows the players to compete against each other for the most points, which are awarded by killing monsters (tougher monsters award more points); it is comparable to the Battle Mode from the Sega Saturn version of Resident Evil. To date, I have not played either multiplayer mode, but just the inclusion of multiplayer is a fascinating idea and aside from the Outbreak games, is one of the only multiplayer titles pre-Resident Evil 5!



    The other mode is the Master of Knifing, a minigame where you basically go through little Knife Battles and the idea for it is to get as many points as possible. I'm not exactly sure how to unlock it (I believe you must beat Rebirth mode), I have played it however. You can choose either Jill or Chris, which are Normal or Hard mode, respectively. It's another great and neat mode to have around in case you're bored. Overall, with everything in this version of the game, how can you not want it? It's got the best gameplay of any version of the original Resident Evil... Sega Saturn version included. 9/10



    Visuals: The visuals don't change much between porting it from the PlayStation to the DS, aside from the compression of the FMV segments, but that is negligable. To be honest, it doesn't look any better or worse. The visuals from the extra segments are actually pretty good though and the extra looks help give the game a more varies look. There is really not much to talk about here, but take what I've said about the original Resident Evil and apply it here. 7/10

    Audio: The audio quality of the game is still pretty good and actually equal to the original PlayStation title. Yes, the bad acting is still there, but the music has actually been remixed for the game. I especially like the save theme for this game in particular. Although there are some tracks missing, I still believe that the music is pretty good. At least it doesn't contain the Dualshock soundtrack 7/10



    Final Thoughts: As I've said before, this is the version of the original Resident Evil to buy, thanks in part to the updated gameplay mechanics. Not only that, so much extra material throughout is some of the best bonuses I've ever seen in a game. The sheer amount of stuff they got into this is pretty damn impressive. Well worth a purchase if you're into classic Resident Evil games.

    Final Grade: 7.5/10
    Last edited by Grim; 01-25-2018 at 12:08 AM.
    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
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  8. #68
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    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Doki Doki Literature Club!



    Console: Windows
    Macintosh
    Linux

    Released: September 27, 2017

    Developer: Team Salvato

    Plot: Your childhood friend, Sayori, has invited you to a club so you have something to do, instead of being a layabout who has no fun. This particular club is the Literature Club, where poetry is written for fun. Upon entering the club room, you get to meet Sayori's other friends: Yuri, Natsuki, and Monika. Hey, they're some pretty cute girls, you say to yourself. Sure, Sayori may have told them you were joining before you even knew about the club, but that's alright, you can forgive her. All you gotta do is get to know these chicks and write & share poetry? Seems like a fair deal, what could possibly go wrong?

    Spoiler:

    Everything.

    8/10



    Gameplay: This is one of the best memetic deconstruction/exploitations of an entire genre I've ever seen. If you haven't already guessed, Doki Doki Literature Club! is a visual novel, much akin to CLANNAD and Little Busters!, which I've already reviewed. The game progresses much like a book would, with branching paths based on the decisions you make, and at certain intervals you get to enjoy a mini-game! Said mini-game consists of a word play game, where as you make a poem, the certain words you use will help get closer to the girls.



    The best part of this game, though, is the methods of telling the narrative, of which at first seems shallow; after all, the game is a visual novel, you just gotta play the mini-game and make a few decisions and get the girl of your choice, right? Wrong. The narrative is so complex I can't do it justice in this short little review. Both the gameplay and narrative intertwine to help deconstruct the dating sim genre and exploit the hapless player through their journey into the utterly depressing world that is Doki Doki Literature Club! The depression factor has little to do with the actual characters, despite their story arcs actually being pretty depressing. It has more to do with the memetics (the study of information and culture) involved with the game. The game is incredibly "meta", with fourth-wall breaks abound; like Raiden in Metal Gear Solid 2, we are put into an incredibly uncomfortable situation against our will, will little to no real information, and the horror comes from the uncovering of the truth. Don't think I'm misusing the word horror, either. Because I'm not. 9/10



    Visuals: To be honest, at first glance, the game doesn't look like much, but it's pretty damn aesthetically pleasing, if you're into anime, of course. The girls are all pretty in their own ways (Yuri is the best though), and the backgrounds, though generic, fit the theme of a high school visual novel. It's the other visuals, the ones I shall not reveal, that are beyond fantastic. Seriously, play this game through to completion and you will know what I mean. 9/10



    Audio: Man, this game is one hell of an earworm. The songs in this are some of the most catchy and fun songs I've heard in gaming in a while, to be honest. I think two of my favorites are "Your Reality" and "Dreams of Love and Literature". There is a common motif among the songs, a verse that is in all of the songs, and is pretty easy to catch if you're paying attention. Other great audio queues are included, but, like the other amazing things in this game, it is not until later, when the fun really starts. 9/10




    Final Thoughts: Seriously, even if you're not a fan or even aware of visual novels as a medium, this is a must play regardless. It is easily one of the best games of 2017, if you accept public opinion, at least. I'm certainly not going to disagree with them, though. Plus, it's a free game, and it's relatively short. It's a win-win, if you ask me. Unless you like your sanity.



    Final Grade: 9/10
    "First the alien, Then the Jew...
    I did no more than you let me do."

    - The Hangman, Maurice Ogden

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