Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 78 of 78

Thread: Grim Reviews Random Games

  1. #61
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Silent Hill



    Console: Sony PlayStation

    Released: January 31, 1999

    Developer:
    Konami

    Plot: Harry Mason is driving with his daughter in the dead of night towards the quiet town of Silent Hill; suddenly, he swerves to avoid hitting a girl, crashing violently and knocking himself unconscious. When he awakens, his daughter, Cheryl, is missing. A mysterious fog and out-of-season snow belays the town, and Harry is alone. He must now find his Cheryl, and uncover what the hell is going on. 7/10



    Gameplay: Borrowing several gameplay elements from Resident Evil (which came out about 3 years earlier). For the most part, Silent Hill plays like a third person behind-the-person camera tank control; there are also a lot of areas that have camera angles that help create a very claustrophobic experience. Harry Mason is a pretty awkward character to control, however. Moving around feels wonky, though I feel that's totally on purpose.

    To me, fighting is one of the biggest problems I have with the original game. I can barely beat most opponents without taking massive damage, and that's actually on purpose. Each enemy is designed to be able to kill you if you fuck up. Hell, the first enemies you fight "kill" you (in reality just knock you unconscious in a great segment just to move the game forward). The fights are meant to be something of a last resort for Silent Hill. Instead, running and leaving the room is one of your best options (except for those damn dogs). Harry is incredibly weak and therefore cannot deal a lot of damage; he's also incredibly inaccurate with his swings and shots.

    The main driving point of this game is the horror aspect, which (if any of you blokes remember) I stated was my scariest game of all time. Seriously, even though it's come out 17 years ago, its horror has aged incredibly well (the control scheme unfortunately, has not). Playing off the uncanny valley and our psychological fears of the unknown, Silent Hill employs visual and audio scares to near perfection (almost like Silent Hill 2, which actually does this better). The only way to know if something is nearby waiting to kill you, you listen to static on a radio. That's pretty smart, because static is pretty unusual and already uncanny in a normal setting. Here, it plays off of a psychological fear that we might hear a voice in that static (which lets be honest, I hope that never happens to me in the real world).

    On the technical side of things (meaning menus and shit) Harry (much like Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield in Resident Evil 1) doesn't have a visible health marker. Instead, when Harry's health is low enough, the PS controller starts to rumble to a heartbeat rhythm; you can also check his health through one of the menus. Silent Hill is also one of the few Survival Horror games to not have a HUD, which makes exploring the menus all the more important.

    Overall, compared to Fatal Frame or Resident Evil, I'd have to say I'd rather play the other two, since the gameplay mechanics were... "better implemented" if that means anything. That's not to say that Silent Hill is an inferior game, it's more of a preference I have. The game is a mixed bag to me, but more positive than not. 7/10



    Visuals: When it comes to visuals, Silent Hill is one of the very best on the original PlayStation, creating some genuinely horrific imagery, and not only that still looks pretty impressive, despite being 17 years old. I mean, I really don't know how to describe just how awesome the games look, I guess giving some screenshots would help.





    A lot of the scenes are very scary, and it's all thanks to the visuals, which still look amazing today, despite being slightly aged.

    I almost forgot to mention how fantastic the cutscenes look. They still look pretty good, considering PS1 graphics, and that's a major plus. 9/10

    Audio: The best thing about Silent Hill, by far (aside from the spooks and horror aspect). From that legendary opening music, to the despondent and discordant pieces of bangs and booms and screeches, it makes the game. Some of my favorite pieces are "Silent Hill", "Claw Finger", and "Not Tomorrow 1". It has some legendary pieces to its name, and the rest of the ambience sets the atmosphere almost perfectly. Considering my background as a Resident Evil fanboy, that's saying something when I say that Silent Hill 1 had much much better music than ole' ResEvil 1. 10/10





    Final Thoughts:
    Although it has its problems, Silent Hill is an experience like no other. It still remains one of the scariest games I've ever played, and there are times where I still cannot get through the game without being properly frightened. It's worth having and owning, and perhaps one of the best PlayStation games of all time, behind perhaps Metal Gear and Resident Evil 2 & 3.

    Final Grade: 8/10

    (Hey hey hey, so, this was originally supposed to be planned for early June, but... stuff happened. However, this is just the beginning of what I like to call "Grim's Summer of Horror". I'll hopefully be doing a lot more reviews in the coming weeks, so yeah.)

    Next Time: Undying

  2. #62
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Clive Barker's Undying



    Console: Windows & OS X
    Released: February 21, 2001 (NA)
    March 16, 2001 (EU)
    Developer: EA Los Angeles

    Story: Patrick Galloway, a renowned occult hunter returns to Ireland to see a sick war friend, Jeremiah Covenent, whom had sought out Patrick after strange events began plaguing his family after the Great War. Upon arrival to the Covenent manor, Galloway learns that it has been left mostly deserted by staff (though a few still remain). Jeremiah, ill from an unknown disease, explains that his family has been cursed by ancient spirits accidentally awoken during his childhood. His brothers and sisters are dead, and now haunt him, and begs of Jeremiah to deal with them before his demise. Unfortunately, that will prove to be difficult, with time travel, ghosts, monsters, and a certain evil wizard tailing him, Galloway is in for a nightmare. 8/10



    Gameplay: I'd just like to say how happy I am to finally be getting around to this game. It's such an underrated classic I can't believe people don't throw it around more when compiling great horror game lists. Undying is a first person shooter, and for PC plays exactly as it should. The mouse looks around and also shoots, and WASD is the standard movement procedure. The controls are not bad at all, very fluid, though some of the other buttons require getting used to, but I prefer to not spoil them and let you go have fun figuring out what the keyboard buttons do.

    The game's main gimmick is the use of a gun and magic. One hand controls weapons, and the other is used for magic and the like. There's an assortment of magic, such as the scrye which allows you to see more than meets the eye, and ectoplasm, shooting projectiles!!! The weapons you get are pretty cool too, you start out with a handgun, and eventually you get a god damn scythe (that has both positives and negatives, unfortunately). You've got mana to look out for too, which depletes when you use magic (duh).

    I'd also like to mention that some cutscenes stop movement of the character, I guess to allow the story to be told, and yeah, it can be annoying sometimes, but I really don't mind it. It could be Metal Gear Solid 2... Oh, and there's traditional, skip-able cutscenes as well; Goodie! Another plus is when you die, you get a cool custom death scene depending on the type of enemy that kills ya! Overall, it's this type of play style I enjoy out of a game, giving a lot of freedom to the player, but also restricting him just enough to keep him focused... for a moment. Yeah, I will say this, explore the world you've been given. It's pretty gorgeous, truth be told. 9/10



    Visuals: Mind you, this happens to be pre-Resident Evil graphics, but even then, they look pretty good. Considering this is the Unreal Engine 1, it looks magnificent. Environments are great, characters are identifiable, and enemies are nicely animated. This game's visuals are so nice that they actually inspire exploration to see everything you can find. Some of the enemies look terribly menacing, as well. 8/10

    Sound: Pretty good sound effects, truth be told. Great music (when it plays), and a nice ambience. Overall, it works quite a bit for the game and is simple, and nice. It is a great ambience. Most of the time, music doesn't play, but it's mostly sound effects and ambient noise, which helps set the tone. Overall, while it's not necessarily memorable, it works for the most part. 7/10



    Final Thoughts: Undying is an underrated gem that never got the recognition it deserved. It should definitely be worth playing once or twice. If any of you are lucky to get this one cheap, I commend you for picking up a great rare game.

    Final Grade: 8/10



    Next Time:

    Ib

  3. #63
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Ib



    Console: Windows
    Released: February 27, 2012
    Developer: Kouri

    Plot: Ib, a nine year old girl, is taken to the local art museum by her parents to examine the works of recently deceased artist, Guertena Weiss. With her parents permission, she wanders off on her own, and is distracted by one of the more abstract works of arts by Guertena. While she's trying to understand the painting, a power outage suddenly occurs in the museum, causing an abrupt evacuation. Ib is accidentally left behind as the doors lock. By herself, some strange paint splatters seem to lead her to a large painting of the deep sea. She is able to step into the painting, entering an alien world of Guertena's works. There, she meets an young man named Garry, and a girl roughly the same age as Ib. Together, they must venture through this strange world and find a way to escape. Along the way, they'll learn more about themselves, and who they are. 8/10



    Gameplay: Ib is a top down horror adventure game, much like Misao and Mad Father (which I've reviewed before), but unlike the other two, this is much much longer and more puzzle oriented. The game is more about the journey, and not the destination, but is also a great character study and a very good psychological horror game. First off, the game controls are simple to understand, with the WASD keys moving Ib and the other characters, and the space bar your general action button. Your health bar is also pretty clever; it's represented by a rose, that wilts as you take more damage. You can replenish your health with vases; there are two types: ones that are one-time use, and endless vases. There's also plenty of save points, so you can work at your own pace without worrying about fucking up too much.

    The game's biggest attraction has to be the horror aspect, which is played very well. It utilizes some great psychological scares, along with some classic jump-scares and fake out. You'll probably (I hope) not be screaming in terror, but I think you'll appreciate the creep factor on display. It's a properly creepy game, which is a big plus in my book. I'd much rather be creeped out and have the game build tension than flat out be terrified.

    As the story unfolds, you get the chance to learn more about the characters you're going to meet. There are prompts which allow you to choose what to say, and It actually drives the story forward and can have long-reaching implications for the rest of the game. Yes, there are multiple endings, which add so much replayability to the game. All the endings, much like Clock Tower, depend on you meeting certain conditions throughout the game.

    Another thing of note is one of the big gameplay mechanics is switching between characters during a segment where the group gets split up. Much like the train segment of Resident Evil 0, the characters are helping each other out even though they aren't necessarily together. It's a nice break from the usual puzzles, and becomes more multi-layered, giving this game a lot more credit. It certainly gives more variety than many of its partners, and is essentially like Corpse Party. Overall, the game is basic RPG maker horror games, with a great story, likeable characters, good psychological horror, and enough gameplay elements to keep you interested all the way through. 9/10



    Visuals: The game looks very much like the original Corpse Party in graphics only, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. It looks like a throwback to old DOS games, and I like it a lot. The characters are well designed (Ib looks seriously adorable), the monsters look truthfully menacing, and the environment is so varied it looks great. There's a lot of dark blues, and browns to accentuate darkness, with red being the usual color for something scary. It mixes dark colors with bright and vibrant ones to just create such a beautiful yet frightening scene that you simply can't look away. The paintings are also really nicely drawn, and you'd just like to look at them and observe them. Simply stated, the game is lovely, and scary at the same time. 9/10



    Audio: The music in this game is really nice, they help set the tone and scene for whatever is happening and I adore the "All Alone" theme for one of the endings. There's also one of the wandering around themes I like. The sound effects aren't bad either, they're really nice too. Some strange sounds that'll get you wondering what the hell it is. Classic horror gaming 101, build tension with sound effects. It works best inside the game and it is really creepy when done right, which the game nails down. 9/10



    Final Thoughts: Ib is a really good game. I underestimated the game when I first played it and came out loving it a lot. On the plus side for anyone looking to give it a try, it's absolutely free. Anyone who liked Misao or Mad Father would definitely enjoy this one.

    Final Grade: 9/10
    Next Time:

    We're going to run and gun it, baby.

  4. #64
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Zombies Ate My Neighbors (Zombies (PAL))



    Console: Super Nintendo
    Sega Genesis/Mega Drive
    Released: July 19, 1993
    Developer: LucasArts



    Plot: Monsters have risen up and are terrorizing the neighborhood, thanks to local mad scientist Dr. Tongue. Having witnessed an attack by one of the monsters, teenage friends Zeke and Julie arm their water pistols and prepare to save the neighborhood. Along the way, they'll gain bazookas, soda cans, Popsicles, weed whackers and crosses to do battle with this cornucopia of death, including: giant ants, evil dolls, vampires, mummies, and yes, even zombies. 7/10

    Gameplay: Zombies Ate My Neighbors is a top down shoot em' up where you traverse the map and collect your neighbors before the monsters do. The game has some fantastic gameplay elements that are numerous throughout the game, but I'd like to think the biggest advantage this game has is cheap b-horror charm. It is fucking awesome and in my top 10 favorite games of all time (#2 in fact)!

    The first thing I should talk about is the main control system; they're actually fairly simple to learn, and I'll be going by the SNES control scheme (if you have the Genesis/ Mega Drive version, you've got the inferior one). The Y button uses weapons you have selected, and the X button uses items you have. B cycles through weapons, and A cycles through items. The L & R buttons open up a mini map that vaguely tells you where your neighborly fellows happen to be. The big complaint I hear people have with this control scheme is the fact you can't cycle backwards. I actually don't have a problem with this, since it's really a minor thing, but I do understand; you receive a huge satchel of weaponry, and cycling through them for a favored weapon type takes some time, but as long as you keep a level head, you'll deal with it and not get hurt in the process.

    You can actually play a two player game, which is really a lot of fun. Unfortunately, there are a few too many problems to really recommend going for the long haul with it. For one thing, no split screen; that's right, you have to share the screen the entire game, but the maps give a lot of room for you to not have to worry about that. Secondly, you both would be getting so few items and ammo, since you do not share them, and for the long haul, that becomes a key problem after level 30, where resources become scarce very quickly, and enemies become much tougher. That doesn't mean multiplayer games can't be successful, just that they may not last until the very end.



    As for the enemies, there are so many monsters in this game from classic and some modern horror that it is really amazing. This game is an all out homage to horror and the B-movies we all know and love. Movies like Texas Chainsaw Massacre/ Friday the 13th, Child's Play, The Blob, Tremors, Them!, and even Honey, I Blew up the Kid (of all movies) are a part of the homage, with enemies reflecting that. Even their niches are present and accounted for. For example, a werewolf will die instantly if you throw silverware at it, the same happens for Creatures of the Black Lagoon. The most annoying enemies in this game has to be the spiders on many of the office levels; they're way too damn fast and can do a ton of damage if you don't kill 'em quick enough.

    Your neighbors are most likely the most important thing in the game. Your objective is to save all of them, and failing to even rescue one in a level results in instant game over, regardless the lives you have. All of them are pretty colorful characters and are worth an assortment of points. You know that teach who keeps givin' you an F? He's worth 50 points. What a dick. There's usually 10 in a level you have to find, and as they die, there becomes less and less each level. Fortunately, since the game works with a point system, you'll be able to earn those victims back in due time.

    The weapons and items are all really hilarious, as is the rest of the game (campy homage and all). Just a few of the items you get are medikits, Pandora's box, red & blue potions, and even decoy clowns! The biggest gamble for items happen to be the mystery potion; the various effects include healing, hurting, speed boost, and the dreaded Hyde Effect (turning evil and killing neighbors). Some of the weapons include Popsicles, footballs, tomatoes, fire extinguishers, and much much more.

    I could go all day on the gameplay, but simply put, running around killing the monsters and saving neighbors in castles, neighborhoods, beaches, caves, pyramids and the like is just too much fun. Great gameplay and wonderful tongue-in-cheek humor. 8/10



    Visuals: Man oh man. The visuals in this game, whilst not perfect, are certainly great, even by SNES standards. Enemies are colorful and spooky, and the settings are gorgeous. You travel from regular places such as the neighborhood, offices, and shopping centers, all the way to pyramids, castles and even football fields (I also forgot to mention Hell itself)! The characters, and neighbors are nicely drawn and look really good. There's not much to say other than the Genesis and SNES versions have slight presentation differences, but despite its censored game over screen I'll still take the SNES version. I should also mention a small detail for you Europeans reading. The chainsaw maniacs in the game are changed to lumberjacks due to heavier censorship... I guess. So overall, these are cartoonish yet spooky visuals worth looking at if you're gonna be playing for 6 hours (like me). 9/10

    Audio: Even better than the visuals is the music! There are so many memorable tunes in this game. It's honestly one of my favorite soundtracks on the SNES just for its kick-ass tunes. Some of my favorite tunes have to be "Mars Needs Cheerleaders" or "No Assembly Required". I totally recommend giving the music a listen to. It's all perfect for your running and gunning experience. I should also mention the spooky monster sound effects in the game, which are also great. Evil Dolls laugh wildly, and Vampires give that gutteral laugh, and the death explosion is AMAZIIIING! Thank you Joe McDermott for this wonderful gift. 10/10



    Final Thoughts: Zombies Ate My Neighbors is a game that is so underrated it's not even funny. If anybody here (which means most of you) is a great fan of horror movies, you'll love this game, like I do. Worth getting for Virtual Console if anybody here owns a Wii or Wii U.

    Final Grade: 8.5/10

    Next Time:

    Are you alone in the dark?

  5. #65
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Alone In The Dark



    Developer:
    Infogrames
    Released: 1992
    Console: DOS, 3DO

    Plot: Jeremy Hartwood, noted artist and owner of the infamous Louisianian Derceto Manor, has committed suicide by hanging. Whilst suspicious, the police close the case quickly and it is rapidly forgotten. Many people believe the suicide to have been due to the purported "hauntings" of the mansion. Edward Carnby, a tough and down-on-his-luck private investigator is hired to retrieve a piano from the mansion for an antique dealer. At the same time, Hartwood's niece, Emily, goes to the mansion in search of a potential note left by Jeremy to explain his suicide. Either one arrives and is immediately trapped inside Derceto before ascending to the loft, where the piano is located. They must now find a way to escape the mansion whilst also searching for the answers to the mystery of Derceto. 8/10



    Gameplay: Alone In The Dark is the original third person survival horror game and almost singlehandily the influence for Resident Evil four years later (I say "almost", it would be complete were it not for Sweet Home (the entire reason Resident Evil was made in the first place) from three years before and of course Clock Tower: First Fear, that had maybe a modicum of influence). Playing very much like Resident Evil, Alone in the Dark utilized the divisive tank controls that worked like their namesake. Pushing the forward key moves your character forward irregardless the direction of either the camera and Carnby/Emily. The left and right keys change the direction of the character you control, be that Edward or Emily.

    Many of the conventions of the survival horror genre were birthed from Alone In The Dark; conventions such as: limited inventory space, an array of different puzzles, very little health and health items, instant kill traps, and of course staggeringly antiquated combat. Yes, I will admit, playing it again has been both a joy and a disappointment; the game is definitely innovative and there are still gameplay elements that are fun, but one of them is not the combat, which is tricky to control at first. Holding space while using the fight mode allows you to get in your fisticuffs stance (or ready to fight with whatever weapon you have), pressing any of the direction keys allows for an attack. Once you get into a rhythm, however, it isn't so bad; the problem lies in once an enemy hits you, they can just keep wailing on you whilst you try to recover, leading to an inevitably quick death. It's stuff like that that makes the game arbitrarily difficult. The puzzles on the other hand are actually not too bad to figure out, and they're quick and help move the game along. The main story of the game is mostly told, much like Resident Evil, through manuscripts and memos left scattered throughout the house. Some of these notes are pretty provocative and intense, even by today's standards, very much written in line with the Cthulhu Mythos, the universe in which this game is set.



    Along with the limited inventory space, there is a way to rid yourself of items. Once a key or other items have been used, you do not automatically get rid of them. You have the ability to drop or throw them, however. Also in line with Resident Evil, you can push large items. There is one last segment that requires, of all things, platforming. You read that right, there's a segment that requires you to jump between several platforms, and if you miss, you land in a lagoon below. It's absolutely terrible and there was no reason for it to even be in the game, but alas, there it is. Another final thing would be all the instant kill traps; not even three rooms into the game and there is a trap that will kill you instantly if you don't notice it, and that is all over the game. Is it frustrating sometimes? Yeah, it is, but as long as you're careful and observant, you shouldn't die; remember, Resident Evil has them too.

    My biggest complaint overall would have to be how poorly the game has aged, which is no surprise. Unlike Diablo, however, this game is still greatly playable and a ton of fun despite not aging so well. It could take some time to get used to the controls and the menu, but if you're keen for old school and innovative gameplay, this is right up your alley. The minor problems set it back a bit, however, with combat being ridiculously hard, a bad platforming segment, and some instant kill traps that are, for better or worse, cheap. 6/10



    Visuals: Here's where Alone In The Dark ends up dropping the ball, with those visuals not aging as well as one would expect. For 1992, these are some brand-spanking new looks and absolutely innovative for its time. However, even playing ten years ago, it didn't look so well. Carnby and Emily look goofy and the enemies look more like geeks than freaks, to be honest. This was the failing of many games that attempted 3D in this time period; there was almost a guarantee that the graphics would improve with time. As bias as it would sound, sprites just seemed to age much better. Ultimately, you'll be looking at a lot of green and quite a bit of putrid brown when all is said and done. The palette for Alone In The Dark does not differentiate that far, other than maybe some purples thrown in there as well. It is not visually stimulating, but for a horror game, the atmosphere is on point. It's not meant to look pleasant and that's what they're going for. I for one enjoy the atmosphere, but not exactly the graphics. 5/10

    Audio: The audio in this game is actually pretty good. There are some spooky noises and some spot on sound effects for the mansion and monsters. Not only that, this actually has some pretty good voice work, I especially like Carnby's voice. A lot of the voices come from the books and papers you find, and they help add to the maddening atmosphere of a Cthulhu Mythos type game.

    The music is also pretty good, although there are a limited amount of songs and they tend to cut in and out a lot of the time. The main music is pretty atmospheric and helps add to the game, the other music also work considering how short and repetitive they can get though. Overall, the audio quality for Alone In The Dark is "meh", good sound effects and voiceover is marred by a lacking soundtrack. 7/10




    Final Thoughts: An innovative game that is still somewhat playable, but marred by it's pratfalls. I, however, would still argue that it is a must play for anyone looking to find the origins of the Survival Horror game and aren't afraid to get your hands dirty with some hard combat and older looking 3D perspectives. The trilogy is currently purchaseable on GOG.com, so go ahead and purchase them post-haste, the first game is well worth it. The other two are just a neat bonus.

    Final Grade: 6.5/10

    Next Time:

    The Next Step in Survival Horror!


  6. #66
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil (BioHazard in Japan)



    Console: Sony PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Microsoft Windows

    Released: March 22, 1996 (PlayStation (JP))
    March 30, 1996 (PlayStation (NA))
    August 1, 1996 (PlayStation (PAL))
    December 6, 1996 (Microsoft Windows (JP))
    July 25, 1997 (Sega Saturn (JP))
    August 31, 1997 (Sega Saturn (NA))
    September 17, 1997 (Microsoft Windows (PAL))
    September 30, 1997 (Microsoft Windows (NA))
    October 1, 1997 (Sega Saturn (PAL))

    Director's Cut (PlayStation)

    September 25, 1997 (JP)
    September 30, 1997 (NA)
    December 10, 1997 (PAL)

    Director's Cut Dualshock Version (PlayStation)

    August 6, 1998 (JP)
    September 14, 1998 (NA)

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: July 10, 1996: Raccoon City's special forces team S.T.A.R.S. Alpha Team is combing through the Arklay Forest in search of Bravo Team, who went missing the night before. Grisly murders had been popping up all throughout the outskirts of the city, and Bravo Team had been sent in to locate the hideout of these vicious cannibal killers. Upon locating the crash landed helicopter of Bravo Team, they landed in search of survivors. Unfortunately, the helicopter was a derelict and all the equipment was missing inside. Going by foot, the team continues their search through the forest and shortly afterwards Joseph Frost is attacked and killed by a pack of dogs. The rest of the team make a beeline for the helicopter, but Brad Vickers (known as Chicken Heart to the rest of the crew), flies off without them, leaving them stranded. They manage to escape into a mysterious mansion that they happen to come across, and it is here where the real nightmare begins. 7/10



    Gameplay: Looks like I'm back to talking about Resident Evil once more! It looks like I just can't get enough of the series! The game plays in tank controls, with the forward button pushing your character in the direction he/she is facing, and of course, the left and right buttons move them into different directions. There are, again, fixed camera angles, much like the other games in the series and the game I just reviewed, Alone In The Dark. Not only that, you have two characters to choose from: Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield.

    Now, if you've read my Resident Evil REmake review, you'd know that that game was a marked improvement upon what this game set up, and it's rather obvious, but don't take that to mean I don't like this game. In fact, I love it! There are a few gameplay elements I would like to make note of, however. The first of which would be that there is no auto-aim in Resident Evil; in fact, it is only available in the Dualshock version, and in BioHazard, the Japanese version of the game. The reason behind this was financially motivated: They wanted to reap as many rent sales in North America as possible. Renting games is a banned practice in Japan and so having an auto-aim wasn't a problem over there; over here, they wanted to make it artificially more difficult so that rentals would be higher. Thus, because of this decision, the game is actually much harder than it should have been. Enemies are able to reel in massive damage to you since you cannot quickly aim their way to stop them. This leads to a lot of health item usage, and since there's really a limited amount, it puts quite a bit of pressure to try not get yourself in highly populated areas (of which there are many). Also, Hunters are the most terrifying thing in this game since they have a one hit kill attack on you if you're in yellow health or lower, making aiming a tense experience.



    Secondly, there is no difficulty option. There is only two, normal and hard mode; both of which are chosen by picking Jill or Chris, respectively. I've said before, their stories play out differently, just like REmake, so there is no real reason to talk about it here. Thirdly, the original game and its subsequent re-releases have a few marked differences. Director's Cut and DC Dualshock have different play modes to mess around with as well. DC and Dualshock have two extra modes, Arrange and Beginner. Arrange changes both the locations of items and enemies. Beginner is exactly how it sounds; it's a beginners mode that makes enemies incredibly easy to kill and doubles the amount of ammo you find. Not only that, DC and Dualshock also have brand new outfits that the characters wear at the beginning of the game, which is a neat little bonus.

    Another thing to note is the radical difference between the original PlayStation version and the Saturn and Windows version. The Sega Saturn version is perhaps one most unique of the three. It contains a whole new enemy, a re-skinned Hunter nicknamed a Tick because of its brown coloration. Not only that, with the addition of a Battle Mode, in which you kill as many enemies as you can with the weapons you're given, you have two completely unique enemies: a zombified version of Albert Wesker, and a Gold Tyrant!!! Another little feature are extra outfits for Jill and Chris. This is just more bang for your buck in what is already a pretty good game!

    In the Windows version, the censorship that the game suffered has been completely circumvented, showing the intro in complete form (and in color!), and showing the complete Kenneth death scene. The Windows version also has two exclusive weapons that the others don't have: a Mac-10 for Jill and an FN-Minimi for Chris. There are also some new unlockable outfits. The graphics in the Windows version is actually much sharper than the other games as well. Overall, I think the Saturn version is probably the best out of the trio, but if you're looking for an uncensored version with some extra stuff, the rare Windows version is for you.

    Rating these games are going to be somewhat of a challenge, so I'll simply rate them separately based on features and what not, so gameplay ratings will look something like this:

    PlayStation Original: 6/10
    Director's Cut: 7/10
    Director's Cut Dualshock: 7/10
    Sega Saturn: 8/10
    Microsoft Windows: 7/10



    Visuals: Now, the game has aged about as well as Alone In The Dark, and that is not all that well. However, I will say that the backgrounds still look somewhat presentable and some of the enemy designs still hold up. The character designs and the zombie designs however are pretty blocky and pretty bad looking in comparison. The Saturn, DC, and Dualshock versions are comparable (Saturn looks slightly more blocky), with the Windows looking slightly better, but still fairly the same. Overall the animations aren't too bad, but there are also the FMV scenes which are "neat", if that's your sort of thing. They're poorly acted, but we'll get to that in a bit. It's also incredible considering the difference between Resident Evil 1 and 2, which are like night and day. 6/10



    Audio: Here's where we get into some pretty treacherous territory. The music for the original, DC, Saturn, and Windows versions are absolutely incredible and really memorable soundtracks with great songs interspersed. The Dualshock version is a fucking dumpster fire of awful shit. It should be noted, the Dualshock version was credited as being composed by the "Japanese Beethoven" Mamura Samuragochi, whom in 2014 revealed he neither was deaf, and had written his own works of music. Essentially, the Dualshock version of Resident Evil's music was ghostwritten and credited to a fraudulant musician; if that doesn't say anything about how I feel about the music, then I have no words for you.

    And speaking of awful things, the voice acting is beyond legendary for how bad it is. It is currently in the Guinness Book of World Records for "Worst Video Game Dialogue", which is hilarious. One of the voice actors, Barry Gjerde (whom also played a character in another PlayStation classic: Clock Tower), is infamous in this game for his vocalization of Barry Burton, and the famous "Jill sandwich" line. Indeed, the voice acting is awful, but at the same time, I can't help but love it. You have to experience it for yourself if you can. So, with some great music (bar the Dualshock edition), but some hilarious acting jobs, the audio for the game could have been great, but falls short of the mark.

    Dualshock: 4/10
    Others: 8/10



    Final Thoughts: Resident Evil has many versions and all of them are varied in some way. I highly recommend looking for either the original, or the Saturn & Windows ports. Take my advice though, DO NOT BUY THE DUALSHOCK VERSION. It is easily the worst of the many ports.

    Final Grade:

    PlayStation: 7/10
    Director's Cut: 7/10
    Director's Cut Dualshock: 6/10
    Sega Saturn: 7/10
    Microsoft Windows: 7/10

    Next Time:

    Another Version!?


  7. #67
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil: Deadly Silence (BioHazard: Deadly Silence in Japan)



    Console: Nintendo DS

    Released: January 19, 2006 (JP)
    February 7, 2006 (NA)
    March 30, 2006 (PAL)

    Developer: Capcom

    Nickname: Resident Evil DS

    Plot July 10, 1996: Raccoon City's special forces team S.T.A.R.S. Alpha Team is combing through the Arklay Forest in search of Bravo Team, who went missing the night before. Grisly murders had been popping up all throughout the outskirts of the city, and Bravo Team had been sent in to locate the hideout of these vicious cannibal killers. Upon locating the crash landed helicopter of Bravo Team, they landed in search of survivors. Unfortunately, the helicopter was a derelict and all the equipment was missing inside. Going by foot, the team continues their search through the forest and shortly afterwards Joseph Frost is attacked and killed by a pack of dogs. The rest of the team make a beeline for the helicopter, but Brad Vickers (known as Chicken Heart to the rest of the crew), flies off without them, leaving them stranded. They manage to escape into a mysterious mansion that they happen to come across, and it is here where the real nightmare begins. 7/10



    Gameplay: There's a very specific reason I decided to review Resident Evil DS separately from the others, and that has mostly to do with the fact that it's probably the version of the original Resident Evil to get. This portable port of the game has included several new nuances and several new modes that make this almost ridiculous. It's a port that didn't need to happen, but I'm certainly glad it exists. The first gameplay element is the modernisation of the controls (including two control schemes in the options menu) and adding little features; the first of which is the official inclusion of a 180 degree turn, which was first introduced in Resident Evil 3: Nemesis. The second of which is the permanent mapping of the knife to the L-button; this means you'll no longer have the knife taking up an inventory space and you'll have it on hand when things get dicey! There's also a tactical reload from Resident Evil 4 in there as well. Finally, and this is probably the most important update, you can skip both door animations and cutscenes. This allows to game to move along quickly and speeds things up a bit. I know it's minor, but being able to skip the door animations is probably the best thing they could have given us! The top screen of the DS also contains a map screen, an indicator for how much ammo you have left in your weapon, and the screen will also flash color depending on your health! The little additions to the gameplay really make this much better than the rest.

    For Resident Evil DS, there are two modes to the main game: Classic and Rebirth. Classic is exactly as it sounds; it is the original game with original enemy and item placements. Rebirth mode, on the other hand, utilizes the DS's capabilities and includes neat little "Knife Battle" segment, a first person minigame in which you use the stylus to swipe or stab the knife at oncoming enemies. It occurs quite a bit, but it is fun and a good way to get some more ammo or health items if needed. Rebirth also has brand new puzzles using the touch screen (and one using the microphone), as well as different enemy placements. As an aside, headshots are far more common on zombies in this mode than the original, for whatever reason. I like both modes, and Rebirth Mode is somewhat more difficult thanks to the addition of more enemies, so think of it as a neat bonus!



    There are also two more modes in Resident Evil DS! There is, of all things, a multiplayer mode, where if you have a bunch of friends who also have a copy of the game, you can play local multiplayer in two types: Cooperative and Competitive. Cooperative mode is where the players work together as members of S.T.A.R.S. (the characters are unlockable through playing the main game) to solve puzzles and help escape the mansion. Competitive allows the players to compete against each other for the most points, which are awarded by killing monsters (tougher monsters award more points); it is comparable to the Battle Mode from the Sega Saturn version of Resident Evil. To date, I have not played either multiplayer mode, but just the inclusion of multiplayer is a fascinating idea and aside from the Outbreak games, is one of the only multiplayer titles pre-Resident Evil 5!



    The other mode is the Master of Knifing, a minigame where you basically go through little Knife Battles and the idea for it is to get as many points as possible. I'm not exactly sure how to unlock it (I believe you must beat Rebirth mode), I have played it however. You can choose either Jill or Chris, which are Normal or Hard mode, respectively. It's another great and neat mode to have around in case you're bored. Overall, with everything in this version of the game, how can you not want it? It's got the best gameplay of any version of the original Resident Evil... Sega Saturn version included. 9/10



    Visuals: The visuals don't change much between porting it from the PlayStation to the DS, aside from the compression of the FMV segments, but that is negligable. To be honest, it doesn't look any better or worse. The visuals from the extra segments are actually pretty good though and the extra looks help give the game a more varies look. There is really not much to talk about here, but take what I've said about the original Resident Evil and apply it here. 7/10

    Audio: The audio quality of the game is still pretty good and actually equal to the original PlayStation title. Yes, the bad acting is still there, but the music has actually been remixed for the game. I especially like the save theme for this game in particular. Although there are some tracks missing, I still believe that the music is pretty good. At least it doesn't contain the Dualshock soundtrack 7/10



    Final Thoughts: As I've said before, this is the version of the original Resident Evil to buy, thanks in part to the updated gameplay mechanics. Not only that, so much extra material throughout is some of the best bonuses I've ever seen in a game. The sheer amount of stuff they got into this is pretty damn impressive. Well worth a purchase if you're into classic Resident Evil games.

    Final Grade: 7.5/10

  8. #68
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Doki Doki Literature Club!



    Console: Windows
    Macintosh
    Linux

    Released: September 27, 2017

    Developer: Team Salvato

    Plot: Your childhood friend, Sayori, has invited you to a club so you have something to do, instead of being a layabout who has no fun. This particular club is the Literature Club, where poetry is written for fun. Upon entering the club room, you get to meet Sayori's other friends: Yuri, Natsuki, and Monika. Hey, they're some pretty cute girls, you say to yourself. Sure, Sayori may have told them you were joining before you even knew about the club, but that's alright, you can forgive her. All you gotta do is get to know these chicks and write & share poetry? Seems like a fair deal, what could possibly go wrong?

    Spoiler:

    Everything.

    8/10



    Gameplay: This is one of the best memetic deconstruction/exploitations of an entire genre I've ever seen. If you haven't already guessed, Doki Doki Literature Club! is a visual novel, much akin to CLANNAD and Little Busters!, which I've already reviewed. The game progresses much like a book would, with branching paths based on the decisions you make, and at certain intervals you get to enjoy a mini-game! Said mini-game consists of a word play game, where as you make a poem, the certain words you use will help get closer to the girls.



    The best part of this game, though, is the methods of telling the narrative, of which at first seems shallow; after all, the game is a visual novel, you just gotta play the mini-game and make a few decisions and get the girl of your choice, right? Wrong. The narrative is so complex I can't do it justice in this short little review. Both the gameplay and narrative intertwine to help deconstruct the dating sim genre and exploit the hapless player through their journey into the utterly depressing world that is Doki Doki Literature Club! The depression factor has little to do with the actual characters, despite their story arcs actually being pretty depressing. It has more to do with the memetics (the study of information and culture) involved with the game. The game is incredibly "meta", with fourth-wall breaks abound; like Raiden in Metal Gear Solid 2, we are put into an incredibly uncomfortable situation against our will, will little to no real information, and the horror comes from the uncovering of the truth. Don't think I'm misusing the word horror, either. Because I'm not. 9/10



    Visuals: To be honest, at first glance, the game doesn't look like much, but it's pretty damn aesthetically pleasing, if you're into anime, of course. The girls are all pretty in their own ways (Yuri is the best though), and the backgrounds, though generic, fit the theme of a high school visual novel. It's the other visuals, the ones I shall not reveal, that are beyond fantastic. Seriously, play this game through to completion and you will know what I mean. 9/10



    Audio: Man, this game is one hell of an earworm. The songs in this are some of the most catchy and fun songs I've heard in gaming in a while, to be honest. I think two of my favorites are "Your Reality" and "Dreams of Love and Literature". There is a common motif among the songs, a verse that is in all of the songs, and is pretty easy to catch if you're paying attention. Other great audio queues are included, but, like the other amazing things in this game, it is not until later, when the fun really starts. 9/10




    Final Thoughts: Seriously, even if you're not a fan or even aware of visual novels as a medium, this is a must play regardless. It is easily one of the best games of 2017, if you accept public opinion, at least. I'm certainly not going to disagree with them, though. Plus, it's a free game, and it's relatively short. It's a win-win, if you ask me. Unless you like your sanity.



    Final Grade: 9/10

  9. #69
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Diablo II



    Console: Windows, Mac OS/X

    Released: June 29, 2000 (Windows (NA))
    June 30, 2000 (Windows (EU))
    July 26, 2000 (Max (NA))
    2000 (Mac (EU))

    Developer: Blizzard Entertainment


    Story: Aiden (the playable warrior from Diablo), son of King Leoric, and his companions, Moreina (Blood Raven) and Jazreth (The Summoner) had succeeded in dispelling Diablo from the human realm of existence, but darkness fell upon them. Aiden had become a vessel of Diablo himself, forced to wander the land in search of his brothers, Baal and Mephisto, whom are trapped inside two of three soulstones. As he wanders, forces from hell appear from which he came, spreading evil and pandemonium across the lands. Tristram was decimated by the demonic army and soon the land of Khanduras had been infested with darkness.

    Having heard of the call for arms against the Army of Darkness, many heroes ventured forth in search of glory, gold, or goodwill to protect the vulnerable people and acquaint themselves with the Sisterhood of the Sightless Eye, the only military force left standing. It is the mission of these brave souls to defeat the evil that stands before them, find the last Horadric Mage, Deckard Cain, and stop the advances of the Dark Wanderer, before it is too late, and Mephisto and Baal are awaken from their slumber... 9/10



    Gameplay: It's about time I finally get to this fucking game, and a review in general. God I'm a slacker. So if everybody remembers my Diablo review (found here), the gameplay is very similar to that, but upgraded to the point that it is just too enjoyable, if you ask me. The first upgrade is more classes to choose from, with 5 classes (2 more to make 7 with the Lord of Destruction Expansion), each with different skills, proficiencies and strategies on how to play them. This is absolutely spectacular as no class is exactly the same. You have the Amazon, Knight, Barbarian, Sorceress, and Necromancer (plus the Assassin and Druid) to play as. More bang for your buck with customization and choice. The skill trees for each respective class has been improved exponentially as well, with three trees to choose from for each character, each with bonuses or abilities to help dish out damage to unsuspecting baddies. YOU CAN ALSO RUN! THANK YOU SWEET JESUS!

    Another upgrade is the difficulty. It is WAY more balanced than it's 1996 predecessor by a long shot. Enemies are neither too weak nor too strong (except for when you go head-long into battle without thinking), and are just right to battle against granted you are at the proper level and have enough weaponry and items, of which you will receive constantly. You get items at a very constant pace, with Rare or Legendary items being fairly uncommon between them. Don't be surprised though if you get at least 3 rare weapons/armor per playthrough. That's my average. Weapons are also upgradeable if they have slots to place gems, runes, or other various items. Each item that you can place in a slot has different abilities, which again, allows an incredible amount of customization to your game.



    Another good thing is a change of scenery. We go so many places that allow a change-up of enemies and people to talk to as well as lore, you can't help but praise the game for it's creativity. We go from grasslands to deserts to jungles to the very edges of hell itself (and highlands in Lord of Destruction). We see many different types of enemies from basic ones such as skeletons, zombies, demons, and ghosts to more unique ones such as Yetis, giant misquitos, maggot-worms, and the like. There's such a variety of things to hear, people to talk to, and things to see and kill, that you'll enjoy it quite a bit (even if some of the enemies are palette-swaps).

    A lot of what Diablo II has to offer is what Diablo brought to the table, but Blizzard wisely upped the ante and gave fans more of the same while also ridding some of the more frustrating elements of the original game. I recently replayed the game the purposes of this review (and a little enjoyment), and it is still ridiculously enjoyable and fluid. The lore, the atmosphere, the tension and just misery this game outputs is top notch and one of the best. 10/10



    Visuals: The look of this game is much improved upon from the original. Sure, it doesn't look too spectacular today, but it continues the tradition of creating an enriching atmosphere full of wondrous environments and cold, uninviting darkness of evil most foul. Creature designs are great, characters are memorable looking and the gore, good God, all the gore. I talked about the change in scenery before, and when you add this all together, you've got one helluva visual experience. This isn't even the best part of the game either. 10/10



    Audio: This. This is the best part of the game by a long shot. If you remember how much I raved about Diablo's soundtrack, this one is 1000x more memorable and enjoyable. By Jove, the amount of memorable tracks that Matt Uelman gave us is nearly never-ending. We've got incredible tracks like the return of the Tristram theme, the Rogue Encampment theme, the first Wilderness theme, and what about the Lut Gholein theme? That one is by far my favorite. Even if we're not talking about the music, there is still a lot of great auditory cues to look out for, as the environment is well and alive through sound effects. The running of water, the far-off screams of helpless victims, the burning of fire, the enemies. It is all there to hear if you turn off the music. Your characters all even have a pretty wicked sense of black comedy at times which lends some leniency to the situations at hand. I love it, and so should you, dammit! 10/10






    Final Thoughts: Almost 18 years since releasing, Diablo II still impresses me over a lot of modern games with just a few smart design, aesthetic, and musical choices. It's in my opinion in the Top 50 games of all time, and it continues to show why Blizzard was the best gaming company around from 1996-2004, putting out top-notch games like this one. I highly recommend getting the Diablo II Battle Chest, as it comes with the Lord of Destruction Expansion and the original Diablo as a bonus, you also get a great strategy guide to go along with it.

    Final Grade: 10/10


  10. #70
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    SplatterHouse 3



    Console: Sega Genesis/Mega Drive

    Release Date: March 18, 1993

    Developer: Namco

    Plot: Five long years have passed since the incidents at the West Mansion. Rick and Jennifer have married and given birth to a child named David. Rick has been able to put the horrors of the past and the memory of the Terror mask behind him, successfully transitioning into a high paying job on Wall Street; he even managed to purchase a lovely mansion in Connecticut. However, the Terror Mask, sensing danger coming to Rick and his family, arrived to Rick once more, forcing him to don it one last time. Rick's family has been made a target of a demonic cult of horrific monsters, looking to revive their God, known as the Evil One. Arriving home late, he finds Jennifer and David missing. Rick must once again save his family with the help of the Terror Mask. 8/10



    Gameplay: SplatterHouse 3 is one of the least talked about in the series, mostly for how much it strays from the original formula of the first two SplatterHouse games. For one thing, SplatterHouse 3 is no longer set on a singular plane, but now played like most other beat-em-ups of the 1990's such as Streets of Rage, Final Fight, and Turtles in Time. So instead of going just left and right, you are able to move vertically on a semi-Z Axis. The second difference between 3 and the first two games is a sense of non-linearity in the level design. You're in a mansion with a goal to get to, but how you get there is up to you, as there are many rooms in the game to see and you can choose to screw around at your own peril.



    The third biggest difference between SplatterHouse 3 and it's predecessors is the importance of time. In the first SplatterHouse game, if you ran out of time, you would simply lose a life (the second did not have a timer). In the third game, however, the timer legitimately dictates what ending you get (yes, multiple endings in a game, my favorite reason to replay a game). Running out of time gives you the worst possible outcome for the particular level, which is a huge downer because the game in the US version is for some reason hard as ass. The Japanese and US version of SplatterHouse 3 each have differences, such as special attacks being different inputs and doing different things (the spin kick for example), and the Japanese version give you more time and bosses have less health, making for an easier time, though the special attacks don't do much damage there. Another little difference is the location of items such as health and power-ups.

    New to the SplatterHouse series is the implementation of a "Power Gauge". During the course of the game, collecting orbs fills your Power Guage, and at any point, you can use all the power you built up to become a super form of Rick. In this form, Rick has more powerful attacks and even a special "Multi-fist" attack that attacks on all sides. It helps when you're fighting either particularly tough enemies or bosses that need to get put down quick.



    The biggest gripe with this game, in my opinion, is that it is flat out hard as shit. Some enemies have hits that come at way too long a range and can cause cheap hits. When Rick gets knocked down, he takes forever to get back up, wasting time, and when you lose a life, you're penalized with the loss of nearly 10 seconds. As I said earlier, time is precious, and when enemies hit you with cheap shots several times in a row, it can cause some major frustrations. The bosses also have way too much health and you never really know how much they actually have unless they show they're being damaged, like losing a head or a face, or bleeding.

    In all fairness, SplatterHouse 3 succeeded in being different than the other games in the series, but it failed to strike home despite being a fantastic experience. A little more polishing and this game probably could have been the best in the entire series. SplatterHouse 2 still edges it out for me, if we're being honest, but 3 is still great, nonetheless. 7/10



    Visuals: The leap in visual fidelity from SplatterHouse 2 to 3 is one of the most astounding things regarding this series, to be honest. This game was released literally seven months after SplatterHouse 2 and somehow they made the game one of the best looking on the Genesis in its entire library. The settings look gorgeous, the enemies detailed and dementedly grotesque, and most of all, it has, in my opinion, the best iteration of the Terror Mask in the entire series, something that would later be used for SplatterHouse (2010). Maybe I might be overrating the game a bit, but for 1993, it's incredibly hard to find a game that looks as fantastic as SplatterHouse 3. 10/10



    Audio: SplatterHouse 3's music is an interesting gift from one "Milky Eiko" Kaneda (who also did the SplatterHouse 2 soundtrack). On one hand, unlike SplatterHouse 2, which is consistently good, this game has both some of the best and worst songs in the series. For the most part, it's a mixed bag, but when the music is good, it is by far better than anything else in the series. When it's not so good, it's droning, loud, and full of headache inducing screeches of noise. There is also bit-crushed voice acting that sounds great in this game, for the few times it appears. The sounds all have an excellent thump and impact to them that allows for great feeling for when you just want to keep beating up monsters. With all that said, I still stand by the opinion this is probably the best soundtrack for the series in spite of some of the crap tracks, just for the sheer quality of the good songs. 9/10







    Final Thoughts: SplatterHouse 3 is an oft-forgotten hidden gem of the SEGA Genesis, but it's one of the better games in the SplatterHouse series and one of the best looking games on the console, period. An incredible rarity, the game fetches upwards of nearly $500~ for a full set. Reproduction cartridges however are like $12~ if you're into the Repro scene. My advice would be to purchase SplatterHouse (2010), since that game legitimately has the original trilogy as bonuses for playing the game proper.

    Final Grade: 8.5/10

  11. #71
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Metal Gear (Nintendo Entertainment System)



    Console: Nintendo Famicom / Nintendo Entertainment System

    Release Date: December 22, 1987

    Developer: Konami

    Plot: News is leaked of a nation state, Outer Heaven, procuring nuclear capabilities. It is revealed they developed a top secret weapon named Metal Gear. U.S. Special Forces FOXHOUND member Grey Fox infiltrates Outer Heaven and subsequently disappears. A rookie by the name of Solid Snake is sent to infiltrate the country by his commander, Big Boss, with a mission to rescue Grey Fox, as well as destroy Metal Gear if possible. 7/10



    Gameplay: Boy, I have to admit, this game is a grade-A awful port of the original MSX Metal Gear. For starters, series creator Hideo Kojima had zero involvement with the game, and he has publicly disowned it. Secondly, the port was made in three months by a team that had nothing to do with the MSX game, leading to many bugs and glitches. Finally Konami told the team to specifically make it as different from the original game as much as possible while maintaining the same base story; resulting in a jumbled mess of random enemy placement, disjointed set pieces, and other unfortunate problems that make the game worse than the original.

    Let's begin with enemies. For the most part, they're plain awful. The way they're placed is intended for you to get caught constantly and get into a battle unless you are 100% perfect on everything, including Snake's movements. Just like in the MSX version, soldiers and dogs in Metal Gear are easy to kill, but just as easily are capable of killing you when you are a lower level (leveling up requires rescuing hostages, like in MSX MG), perhaps even more so considering their placement. There's also the elephant in the room; Metal Gear isn't in Metal Gear. Instead of the Metal Gear, you face the "Supercomputer", which makes the whole experience up to that point deflated.



    Addressing the set pieces, it's very weird. The original MSX version begins with a branched path in a warehouse that, while semi-linear, allowed you to go whichever direction you wanted at your own pace. The NES Metal Gear, on the other hand, is strickly linear and set in a jungle, with false branching paths for little to no reason other than to serve as a minor distraction and obstacle to overcome. There's few places to actually explore and some paths just put you back onto the same screen, but in a different location. Once you get past the Jungle bit, it becomes a bit more open, but that opening segment should leave a very bad taste in anyone who's played the MSX version and then this one immediately afterwards. It's incredibly jarring. Do expect to see the Jungle several times as well, as when you die, you are sent back to the beginning of the game until you finally gain a rank (luckily you get to keep the equipment you've gained up to that point when you die).

    We then get to the biggest problem with Metal Gear. Glitches and mistranslation galore. Due to the rushed job that was placed on the team in making this port, there was no time to fine-tune several things about the game, making it somewhat unpolished, and the biggest offender has to be the translation from Japanese to English. There's shit like the oh so famous, "I feel asleep!" and "Contact missing our 'Gray Fox'." sprinkled about for extra fun. Overall, the Metal Gear on NES is considered a classic by many, but coming back to play it just generally isn't that fun and isn't as much of a wholesome experience as the MSX version. 5/10



    Visuals: The visuals aren't anything too special, if we're being honest. It's a lot of grey and brown palettes that, while works for the jungle, gets more muddied into gray as the game goes on. Snake is a little more colorful than in the MSX version, and other than that, everything else looks nearly the same. Honestly, I don't have much there to really talk about in regards to this. It's fairly forgetful. 6/10



    Audio: The music in the NES version of Metal Gear isn't actually that bad. For the most part, it's a slight re-hash of the original but with a few new songs mixed in here and there. While the original songs are remixed slightly, they're still pretty good and the new songs are actually cool. I'm more partial to MSX and "Theme of Tara" but "Jungle Theme" works just as well here as a pulse-pounding tense sneaking song. As for sound effects, largely, they're of equal quality compared to the MSX version, so there's little to go by there. While I love the original's soundtrack, NES Metal Gear still has some quality. 7/10





    Final Thoughts: Good God. When going from the MSX version the NES version, it's a stark contrast in quality and in general fun, to the original Metal Gear. It's a classic, yes, but unlike Simon's Quest, there is little reason to actually own it other than to say, "I own the NES version of Metal Gear!" At most it should be $15~ if even that. If you've never played the original game, I'm sure you'll have a higher opinion of this than I did.

    Final Grade: 6/10

  12. #72
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Metal Gear: Snake's Revenge



    Original Console: Nintendo Entertainment System

    Original Release Date: April, 1990

    Developer: Konami

    Plot: Three years have passed since the events of Outer Heaven. FOXHOUND has uncovered intelligence regarding a hostile Middle Eastern country obtaining plans for a new Metal Gear. Solid Snake, now a Lieutenant, is selected as part of a three man team comprised of Snake, John Turner, and Nick Myer. They name the mission Operation 747, and the three are airlifted into enemy territory. Things immediately go south for the group, however... 6/10



    Gameplay: So here we are, talking about the Metal Gear 2 that really isn't. Where to begin? Snake's Revenge begins as a top down stealth shooter, like the original Metal Gear. Unlike Metal Gear, there are side-scrolling sections to add on to the experience as well as crouching (and even underwater travel) in those segments, the first of their kind in the series, but it wouldn't be until Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake that crouching was optimized for top-down screens. Snake's Revenge also does have some much better level design than Metal Gear on the NES. Instead of a particularly linear set up, Snake's Revenge starts you off in a winding jungle filled with goodies and guys to save. Once you get into the base, it opens up more for you to explore, which I enjoy in regards to the Metal Gear series.

    Unfortunately, Snake's Revenge has one of the highest difficulty curves in the entire series, searchlights and enemies in general spot you and are too good of shots to allow you to live past the first few screens. Once you manage to weave your way around, it does become a little easier, but not by much. The side scrolling segments aren't the greatest, and the boss-fights are flat out unfair. It's very much a touch and go kind of game, with plenty of trial and error, if you're willing to overcome the frustration.



    As you can tell, I don't really have a whole lot to say about the game due to it sharing many similarities with the NES Metal Gear. I think the biggest compliment I can give Snake's Revenge is that it utilizes several great set-pieces. The game takes you places, such as a Jungle, a Military Base, an Arms-Transit Train, some Depots, and to the heart of the Metal Gear Compound itself. It's feels more fleshed out than the first two games were, and that's a genuine compliment, it feels like a scaled down version of Metal Gear Solid 3 in a way just with how much it travels about. But other than that, there's little reason to actually play the game, if you're looking for a genuinely great game. It's unbalanced, full of bad game design, and is a trial and error mess of frustration. 5/10



    Visuals: To be honest, Snake's Revenge is a bit of a marked side-step from Metal Gear, in a way. The visual style is markedly different from the dark, grimy aesthetic of the first two and is now more colorful, has more vibrancy to it. Snake traded in his olive drab uniform for orange jumpers (as can best be described really) making him look utterly hilarious, in all honesty. The world's greatest spy is wearing bright orange. Good lord. 6/10



    Audio: The biggest outlier to Snake's Revenge by far is the quality of the soundtrack. It's one of the best NES Konami soundtracks out there, competing with the likes of Super C or the CastleVania games. "Jungle Infiltration", "Arms-Cargo Transit", and "Metal Gear Fortress" are incredible set pieces with a great tone and vibe to them, sneaking about with that music blasting out is a fun time, even if the game itself isn't. 9/10






    TL/DR Summary:
    Snake's Revenge is a hilarious mess of broken gameplay, great set design, and wonderful music all wrapped up in a cheesy 80's action movie plot. If you really want to actually play this, pay at most $5~ for it, if anything. It's ironic that as messy as this game was, it's singlehandily responsible for the Metal Gear franchise becoming what it is, as Hideo Kojima had no knowledge of a sequel being in the works until a developer told him. What we'd get from Kojima is a gaming masterpiece and genuinely one of the best 8-bit games of all time.



    Final Grade: 6.5/10

  13. #73
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil - Code: Veronica
    (BioHazard - Code: Veronica)




    Console: SEGA DreamCast

    Release Date: February 3, 2000

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: Three months have passed since the US Government's destruction of Raccoon City, a Midwestern town home to a headquarters of Umbrella Inc. Claire Redfield, a survivor of the catastrophe, has been searching for her brother since then. Raiding an Umbrella facility in Paris, Claire is captured and taken to Umbrella's private prison island in the Southern Ocean: Rockfort Island.

    Some time following her imprisonment, she is released by a severely wounded guard, Rodrigo Raval. Leaving her cell, Claire comes to discover that Rockfort Island has suffered an outbreak from the T-Virus, the same virus responsible for Raccoon City's destruction. Escaping recently undead zombies, Claire comes across a fellow prisoner, Steve Burnside. Together, they must work alongside one another to escape the island before they too fall victim to the horde of monsters. 9/10



    Gameplay: Resident Evil - Code: Veronica is the fourth main-line game in the series and is fondly remembered as one of the more cinematic and best looking games for the time; having been originally released on the SEGA DreamCast, the game was faster, better looking, and with the better hardware, was capable of doing much more than it's predecessors. Unfortunately, Code: Veronica fell just short of expectations after Resident Evil 2 and 3 were masterclasses of gameplay. While improved in several departments, Code: Veronica is, for all intents and purposes, "one step forwards, two steps back."

    Starting off, the 180 degree turn returns to Code: Veronica after it's introduction in Resident Evil 3: NEMESIS. From here on out, it's a standard feature in all future mainline Resident Evil games, which is great as it allows for some quick thinking and tactical maneuvering around enemies. It's arguably something the Resident Evil games needed in order to further the series, as well as the addition of auto-aim for the North American crowds.

    A niche addition to Resident Evil - Code: Veronica is that of the dual-wielding pistols. I think it's a neat experiment here as Claire can wield two pistols at the same time for double the damage on enemies. Even better, if faced with two enemies from differing directions, Claire will auto-aim so both pistols face the respective enemies, allowing you to shoot down two zombies at once. I appreciate that this game was willing to experiment with new ideas and I for one love this idea and wish more Resident Evil games had adopted it. Alas, this would be the only game where you could dual-wield weapons.



    I think my favorite thing about this game for me is the return of Resident Evil 1 antagonist Albert Wesker in all his shady glory. This time around he's a super-powered inhuman villain. However, it's a shame that he kinda takes a backseat to two other villains, and doesn't do anything particularly antagonistic to Claire and co. He's more an obstacle and a tertiary party causing trouble for everyone involved. The main villain is in fact the selfish and psychotic Alfred Ashford, owner of the Rockfort Island prison facility and head of the Umbrella Antarctic Research Facility. In Code: Veronica X (an updated version of the Dreamcast game), Wesker gets more screentime explaining his backstory, which makes it more reasonable to search for a copy of that game, as its additions, while minor, add to the story.

    There is also the addition of a Battle Mode like with the two games previous. You can choose your character, and additionally the perspective you wish to see from (Resident Evil's first experiment with first-person shooting). It's a great addition to the game but doesn't exactly set the bar in comparison to The Mercenaries from Resident Evil 3. It's something of a bonus for those who finished the game and wish to continue the Code: Veronica experience.




    With all the good things though, there are some bad to come along with it. For one thing, there's not much of a variety of enemies as compared to Resident Evil 2 & 3 (a comparison I think is arguably unfair, but it deserves mention). You have your zombies, your dogs, and your giant spiders, but of the regular enemy additions, you have zombie bats (this game's equivalent to crows), the one strech-armed Bandersnatches, and two very strange enemy types: albinoids and ants. Albinoids are essentially electric salamanders, and ants are... ants. Personally, I don't think they are very interesting and they just feel tacked on for the sake of enemy types, instead of like with 3 where they seemed like logical mutants and aberrations that would occur with a viral outbreak.

    Another negative for this game would, in my opinion, be the length and constant backtracking this game suffers from. It's one of the longer classic Resident Evil games, which isn't a bad thing, necessarily. The problem though is that it's artificially longer thanks very much in part to the lack of shortcuts from segment to segment. Instead of a situation like in REmake where solving a certain puzzle unlocks a shortcut back to the central hub, or Resident Evil 2, with many ways to traverse about the police station from the central hall, Code: Veronica has no way to cut backtracking time in half. There are some puzzles that require you to go from one segment to the end of another segment, and all the way back in the exact same path.

    Not to mention there's very much a sense of clear linearity to item use and puzzle design compared to Resident Evil 1. The previous games gave you choices for what to do in whatever order you wanted to. Code: Veronica puts that to bed by restricting you to very much one path of doing it. It's this design choice that leaves me slightly disappointed in Shinji Mikami and co. as they were obviously starting to shy away from the element of "choice" even beginning with Resident Evil 3. 3 still gave you choices in what to solve in what order in certain sections, however, and it had the element of replayability with many different cutscenes to quench your thirst for options. Code: Veronica leaves you with one major "option" and the most it does is allow for better weaponry for later in the game, and that's just sad. I was very much expecting more from Capcom, but they dropped the ball on this one.



    I think the biggest problem with Resident Evil - Code: Veronica, if we're being honest, is the difficulty. It's the hardest classic Resident Evil game of the series and a lot of it has to do with the toughness and amount of enemies, as well as absurdity of the puzzles. Those dual wield pistols I talked about earlier? They don't have any ammo to replenish with. You are stuck with what you have, so it becomes a more strategic thought process on when you want to use up your precious dual wield guns. Then there's the boss difficulty. It's hard enough having to deal with incredibly tough bosses, but there are certain points in the game where you can be locked out from stocking up on ammunition for the fight, leading to having to actually restart the game despite your save. Then there's the locations of the boss fights; if you are pushed by an enemy far enough, you can actually fall to your death, which is a legitimate gripe I have with the game. You have to sacrifice space from a boss (the one thing that kept you safe in previous games) just so you aren't killed instantly by being knocked back. I hate it, absolutely hate it.

    As I said earlier, Resident Evil - Code: Veronica is a case of "one step forward, two steps back". While there are neat ideas here, they failed to live up to the expectations set by previous games and failed to truly move the bar as each game previous had. That said, I wouldn't call this a failure at all. It's still classic Resident Evil action in all it's glory. Battle Mode is a welcome addition, and I still had fun with it at the end of the day. 7/10



    Visuals: When coming from the PlayStation to the Dreamcast, I was excited to see the upgrade in visual fidelity from the previous games. The Dreamcast was a vastly superior system to the PlayStation, and could handle software at a more manageable rate; this allowed for Code: Veronica to really strut it's stuff, and for 2000, these are absolutely stunning visuals for the time. Gone are the days of pre-rendered backgrounds too; every setting is produced in real-time 3D resolution. Unfortunately, it would not be until the Resident Evil: Outbreak series, that we would come to a return of this form. It's still one of the best looking Resident Evil games in the early days of the series, and with X ported to many newer systems, looks even better today. 10/10



    Audio: Sadly, even with the increase in visual fidelity, Capcom failed in one of the biggest departments for Code: Veronica, and that was the audio. The voice acting took a step back in regards to Steve and Alfred's voice actors. Claire, Chris, and Wesker all put in very serviceable performances but the insanity and camp of the former party took away from the experience of a serious horror thriller. They aren't Resident Evil 1 level bad or hilarious, they are just sub-par. The music was also a bit of a let down. Gone were the memorable and ambient filled pieces of the first three games. What we received was an orchestral menagerie of very few memorable songs interspersed with many forgettable pieces. The save theme was naturally outstanding, as with all games in the series, but after that, it becomes hard to remember any song that really stuck out to me. 6/10






    Final Thoughts: Resident Evil - Code: Veronica is a perfectly fine Resident Evil game, even a top 10 game in the series. However, they are several problems that keep it from being the masterpiece it should have been. It's unfortunate that after two incredible games in the series, that Code: Veronica would be the one to fail to impress as much as people said it would. It's a fan favorite for a lot of reasons, and I can totally see where they're coming from. I just don't agree with their arguments. For me, it's a fun Resident Evil game, but nowhere near as good as it's two predecessors.

    Final Grade: 8/10

  14. #74
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil: Survivor
    (BioHazard Gun Survivor)




    Console: PlayStation

    Release Date: January 27, 2000

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: One month after the destruction of Raccoon City at the hands of the U.S. Government, an Umbrella-owned island located in Europe, Sheena Island, is infested with a T-Virus outbreak. A helicopter seems to make its escape from the island when a man hanging on to the landing skids shoots at the pilot, causing the helicopter to crash. The pilot manages to escape the wreckage alive, but dazed. He realizes he is suffering from amnesia and quickly looks to work around his surroundings for anything that could give him a clue as to who he is, as well as how to escape the doomed isle of the dead. 5/10



    Gameplay: Resident Evil: Survivor is a guilty pleasure of mine. I will tell you right off the bat that Survivor is for all intents and purposes, a cash grab and an experiment at something new, but fails so spectacularly that it just barely edges into the "So Bad it's Good" territory, like Clock Tower 2: The Struggle Within. The biggest attraction to this game was that it would "revolutionize" the Resident Evil genre as a whole by bringing first person shooting to the series. I admit, I genuinely enjoy the aspect of a proper first person shooter game the ilk of Umbrella Chronicles or Darkside Chronicles (i.e. on-rails shooters), but for an experimental game, this wasn't the worst attempt at it.

    First things first is that the tank controls are no longer confusing with the first person control, so if you're looking to introduce someone to the Resident Evil series with a not-so "confusing" game, this is the one to go for. Secondly, your pistol has unlimited ammo, which does make the game somewhat easier, but it was already an easy game to begin with. Other weapons however do require ammo, allowing for a bit of strategy: When big enemies arrive, do you waste your ammo on them, or do you wait until the final boss?

    The most interesting addition to this game is the branching path. While they all very much lead to the same place, it adds a lot of variety for the game and a bit of replayability for those looking to find all the documents or weapons (such as the 3 exclusive pistol types, depending on which path you go for). Right away you're giving a hefty choice between a movie theater, a restaurant, and a church to explore, and it goes further along the way for more choices. I like the idea they did here and wish more Resident Evil games had branching paths the way Survivor does.



    The major negatives regarding Resident Evil: Survivor become apparent nearly right away. It's an incredibly short and easy game. Enemies don't do nearly as much damage as they should and it's actually something of a breeze killing all the enemies. For example, Mr. X, the second big boss from Resident Evil 2, appears in large numbers throughout the game and is incredibly easy to put down even with the pistol as long as you have enough distance.

    The second negative is the lack of saving. The game is incredibly short and doesn't require saving of any kind due to the easiness of the gameplay. Unfortunately, what that also does is remove the penalty for dying, as now you have the traditional "lives" in case you die. It lessens the potential experience this game could have had with a much longer game with saving being a requirement. Instead, it's a relatively short experience that can be finished in a matter of 2 hours or so, as compared to the original trilogy's 4 or so hours.

    The final negative is truly the lack of any real enemy variety. Aside from the Gravedigger Unit (Umbrella's own BOW Cleanup Crew), and the Hypnos T-Type (the final boss), almost every enemy was recycled from Resident Evil 2 & 3. It sucks when you enter a room filled with zombies and it's literally one of four flavors of zed. Hunters and Lickers return here as well, which are nice and all, if they weren't so hard.

    So with all that said, I can firmly state that the gameplay isn't exactly the reason this game falls on it's face. It's short, easy, and at times not very engaging, but it had good ideas that just needed more fleshing out. No, no, we'll get to the reason this game falls into the "So Bad It's Good" territory. 7/10



    Visuals: Now I understand that I did these reviews a little out of order (with Code: Veronica coming out literally a week after this game), but honestly, even without Code: Veronica as a comparison (it would have been a bad one too, since that came out on a more powerful system), Survivor's visuals are awful. Some of the worst the series has to offer. The cutscenes are made with in-game assets but the visual fidelity is choppy and many of the assets are recycled from Resident Evil 2. As I said earlier in the review, there are like four flavors of zombie and all of them come from RE2. Not to mention the real lack of interesting locations bar an exempt few and you have a very dull looking game. 5/10



    Audio: Here we are, the reason this game treads into "So Bad It's Good" territory, and it all comes down to one thing: The voice-acting. It is so laughably bad, so hilariously over-the-top, and so wildly campy that it is just a roller coaster of hilarity. No joke, just try to listen to this scene with a straight face.



    I just can't. I'm not one for comedy in my reviews, but that is some Uwe Boll level delivery there. I love it, and I love it in just how awful it is. It's the kind of thing that makes me love this game so much, for just how awful stuff like that is. It's somehow worse than the original Resident Evil, so take that for what it's worth.

    But do you want to know the biggest crime about this game? How incredible and atmospheric the game's music actually is. It's genuinely one of the best soundtracks in the entire series but it's completely marred by the monotonous gameplay and absolutely God-awful voice acting. If the game had no voice-acting, I genuinely think the game would have likely been better received by the public at large. It's a crime for such an unheralded soundtrack to be this good and so disproportionately better than everything else. 5/10







    Final Thoughts: So while Resident Evil: Survivor isn't the worst attempt at the first person Resident Evil, there was a lot more that Capcom should have done to guarantee its success. It's at this point in the series, after four years and 5 games, that Resident Evil games failed to further the series more after NEMESIS proved that a more action-oriented Resident Evil can be resoundingly successful if given proper care. Survivor is just one of those "So Bad It's Good" kind of games.

    Final Grade: 5.5/10

  15. #75
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Resident Evil Zero
    (BioHazard Zero)




    Console: Nintendo GameCube

    Release Date: November 12, 2002

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: July 23rd, 1998: A train travels through the backdrop of the Arklay Mountains. The Umbrella Inc. operated Ecliptic Express traverses through the night. The Express is attacked by T-Virus infected leeches and all aboard are slaughtered or infected from the virus itself; the train is grinded to a halt and no longer moving, stuck in Arklay Forest. During the same period of time, S.T.A.R.S. Bravo Team flies into the forested mountains by helicopter, investigating a series of gruesome and cannibalistic murders on the outskirts of the Midwestern Raccoon City. Their helicopter is forced to make an emergency landing after an operating failure, and Bravo Team decides to investigate the region, leaving behind Raccoon Police Department pilot Kevin Dooley to man the repairs.

    Rookie S.T.A.R.S. operative Rebecca Chambers and co. discover a crashed military jeep with deceased occupants nearby. After further investigation, Bravo Team discovers the jeep had been transporting recently court-martialed 2nd Lieutenant Billy Coen, who was sentenced to death and was on the move to Regathon Base for execution. Splitting up from the rest of the group, Rebecca discovers the Ecliptic Express and against better judgement, decides to investigate the interior of the train for Billy Coen. She discovers the trains occupants have recently risen from the dead, and eventually, Rebecca comes to find Billy Coen, who is less than willing to listen to Rebecca. Together though, they must find a way to survive through the nightmare the two are going through. 9/10



    Gameplay: Following the release of the REmake in March, Zero had quite a bit of expectation to follow the masterpiece. However, Zero serves as a sort of marked evolutionary side-step to the Resident Evil series and would legitimately serve as the background for future games such as Resident Evil 5, 6, and the Revelations series. The biggest difference between this game and every other one before it is the utilization of the partner system, which would inspire the rest of the series bar Resident Evil 4. You control both Billy and Rebecca at the same time, much in the same way the later games would work, and you are able to switch between them at the press of a button, as well as being able to direct the AI with the GameCube's C-stick.

    Rebecca and Billy are also unique in their own personal abilities; much like Jill and Chris from the first game, they play differently to each other. For example, Rebecca has the ability to mix herbs together; Billy on the other hand cannot, but he can move heavy objects around that Rebecca can't. They can also split from each other allowing for both characters to be on two completely opposite sides of the map if you so choose; there are some scenarios that do force the two to be separated from one another for key game events. For 2002, it was a revolution in the Resident Evil series.



    There's also an interesting variety of enemies in comparison to some of the earlier games we've talked about. For example is the introduction of the leech monsters, that serve as a sort of hive mind and when defeated explode. We also have the Eliminators, an experiment involving apes and the T-Virus. Then we have the Plague Crawlers and Lurkers. Plague Crawlers are grasshopper-like monstrosities and Lurkers are giant frog BOWs that have the ability to disarm and kill you in one fell swoop. There's also the usual menagerie of enemies: zombies, Cerberus, giant spiders, crows, etc.

    Perhaps the biggest point of contention in regards to Resident Evil 0 was the idea to remove item boxes. Now, in 2019 it may not seem like a huge revelation that item boxes are a tad outdated, but in 2002 it could easily be considered heresy for the series. To counteract the lack of item boxes, Resident Evil 0 allowed players to leave any item they have in their inventory strewn about on the ground so that they could come back to it if they needed to. While an interesting idea, I think it should have been thought out a little further, as you're only given 12 inventory slots to work with, and some weapons take up two. It seems at times it wasn't implemented well at all and it's one of the biggest gripes people have with the game overall. It could be a whole hell of a lot worse

    I think the other negative that a lot of people have with the game is that it peaks incredibly early. The entire train segment is a fantastic piece of the game all the way through, and I think people just never felt the spark following it. Personally, I think the Umbrella Training Facility is the peak of the game with its atmosphere, music, and general pacing, but the Train is definitely a close second for me. I think the segments after the Training Facility are very good as well, if we're honest with each other.



    If you're also playing the updated Remaster for some of the newer systems, you'll also get a chance to come across this gem: Wesker Mode! In this mode, you play as Rebecca and Wesker, playing out the game much the same way from the campaign, but with a twist. Wesker is super-powered in this mode and absolutely destroys everything in his path thanks to his special abilities. It's one of those fun extra modes to play after you finish the game if you haven't had your fill of it.

    With all that in mind, I don't think it deserves as much as the polarizing opinions as it gets. It's a perfectly acceptable Resident Evil game for the next generation and it introduces a concept that would become a mainstay of the series for the next 13 years. It's not that hard to respect a legacy like that. 8/10



    Visuals: For 2002, these visuals are just on par with the REmake in terms of flair and fidelity. The settings are all great and they evoke a very worn exterior with creepiness abound in them. The character models are all spectacular just like in REmake, and Rebecca is just the cutest person ever. The monster designs are all incredible as well, all a sort of Lovecraftian horror from Umbrella's early days. I think to get the best idea of how amazing the visuals are, look no further than the Train segment and see that even the pre-rendered backgrounds are stunning. 10/10



    Audio: The voice acting is improved upon here and is no longer laughably horrible like in Survivor or inconsistent like in Code: Veronica. I enjoy the banter between Rebecca and Billy as they continue to grow closer, it seems genuine as far as I'm concerned. Then we have the music, which continues to be on point for the series. They are wildly atmospheric and incredibly creepy, and there's even opera that somehow works for the game as the calling card for the main villain. Some of these tunes are just fantastic. 8/10






    Final Thoughts: Overall, while it's not the longest of Resident Evil games (in fact it's on the shorter side), it has enough positives to make it worth playing if you're willing to overlook the one glaring flaw (item pickups) of it. With some fantastic visuals and incredible audio to boot, this is perhaps one of the more unheralded games in the series that is finally getting the respect it deserves since coming out on the newer systems.

    Final Grade: 9/10

  16. #76
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Justice For All
    (Gyakuten Saiban 2)




    Console: GameBoy Advance

    Release Date: October 22, 2002

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: Months have passed since the thrilling conclusions of the DL-6 Incident and the SL-9 Incident. Maya Fey has returned to Kurain Village to finish her studies as a spiritual medium and head of the clan. Phoenix Wright has taken to selecting very few cases since Maya's departure. Perhaps most shocking of all, is the "death" of Miles Edgeworth, who disappeared after the harrowing events of his murder trial. Things have indeed changed for Mr. Wright, and like deja vu, things will fall back into place.

    After receiving a call from a local doctor, Turner Grey, who wished to visit Maya Fey at Kurain Village to speak to the spirit of a recently deceased nurse and clear his name of malpractice, Phoenix relents and takes him. After meeting with Maya once again and talking to the head trainer of the village, Morgan Fey (Maya and Mia's aunt), and catching up with Lotta Hart again, they prepare to channel the dead in a locked room, Dr. Grey and Maya alone. Gunshots are heard and when Phoenix busts the door open, they discover a gruesome scene: Dr. Grey dead and Maya transformed into the spirit of the nurse. Morgan ushers the group out of the chamber and deals with the spirit herself.

    Maya is arrested and believed to be the culprit of the murder, everything tying to her. However, Phoenix knows that Maya can't be a murderer and takes the case for himself, scrambling to find all of the evidence he can before the trial. Along the way, he meets Maya's niece and Morgan's daughter: 8 year old Pearl Fey. Pearl agrees to help Phoenix (whom she believes to be Maya's "special someone") uncover clues to this mystery and clear Maya's name once more. It will not be easy, as a Von Karma stands in his way to getting the truth. It'll take Phoenix all of his wits and cunning to get out of this mess, but it's only the beginning... 10/10



    Gameplay: For many people, Justice For All is the redheaded step-child of the series, as it's place between more esteemed colleagues, Ace Attorney and Trials and Tribulations, leaves it oft forgotten. For many, this is an interesting look in how future games would play out, and it is also by far the darkest game the series has to offer, dealing with many topics such as: familicide, revenge, suicide, psychological abuse and even torture.

    Justice For All is an important part of the Ace Attorney series, as it gave us two enduring additions, Psyche-Locks and the ability to use character profiles as evidence for objection. Thanks to the power of Maya's magatama, Phoenix is now capable of interrogating witnesses and suspects in a more thorough manner; this leads to some witnesses having "Psyche-Locks", a mental barrier that shows the witness is either withholding information or outright lying, leading to Phoenix to have to use evidence and character profiles to unlock the needed information to continue. These Psych-Locks also replenish Phoenix's penalty bar upon completion, but for every wrong answer, empties it more and more, making it a gamble on how to proceed. Luckily, it isn't the end of the game when working through Psyche-Locks.

    Other than that, the game is just as the first game. I honestly don't mind the Psyche-Locks too much and I definitely appreciate the ability to use character profiles instead of just having them as a reference. Justice For All is a good look at how to have improved the Ace Attorney series without muddying it with weirder mechanics. It's an excellent sequel that is incredibly enjoyable and it helps set the foundation for Trials and Tribulations with much of its story, such as everyone's relations to one another. It also has probably my favorite final case of any Ace Attorney game, "Farewell My Turnabout". It's definitely an equal to the first game in all conceivable areas. 10/10



    Visuals: More splendid goodness on the part of Capcom in this game. I think my favorite character designs this game are Franziska Von Karma, Pearl Fey, and Matt Engarde. The settings are also nicely designed, some of them having traditional Japanese flairs to them, such as Kurain Village, others a vibrant setting like Berry Big Circus. There's no shortage of gruesome scenes either and it does not hold back on showing us darker scenes, and I appreciate it. 9/10



    Audio: The music in Justice For All is something of a point of contention. It's the most divisive soundtrack in the series as it generally has some of the best songs of the franchise, but much of the soundtrack is considered "weak" in comparison to others. I think the soundtrack is perfectly fine and hardly that weak. It's tonally more grounded in the sense of tensity and darkness. My favorite tracks are probably "Core 2002", "Objection 2002", and oddly, what many consider the weakest cornered theme, "Cornered 2002". I get there's just a few stinkers in there, "Congratulations, Everybody, Again" and "Eccentric", but there were some in Ace Attorney as well. 9/10








    Final Thoughts: For some people, Justice For All is a weak-point in the series. For me, it's one of the best in the series with some of the best cases. It's another stellar entry to the Ace Attorney series, and its inclusion in the Phoenix Wright Trilogy coming to Switch makes it even more worthy of a purchase. It's probably my second favorite game in the series.

    Final Grade: 9.5/10

  17. #77
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Trials and Tribulations
    (Gyakuten Saiban 3)




    Original Console: GameBoy Advance

    Original Release Date: January 23, 2004

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: Five Years previous to Phoenix Wright's first case: rookie Mia Fey takes on a tough case; a man has been murdered, and the defendant is none other than... Phoenix Wright himself, a college student at the time. Accused of murdering a student, Doug Swallow, it is discovered that a witness had seen what really happened; Pheonix's girlfriend, Dahlia Hawthorne. Mia Fey, having met Dahlia once before, exposes her as the true culprit of the crime and has her arrested, tried, and found guilty: sentenced to death. Before her arrest, Dahlia proclaims that she and Mia will meet once again. Inspired by his defense, Phoenix Wright changes majors from Art to Law and becomes the lawyer he becomes today. However, dark secrets lurk in every corner, and sooner than he thinks, Mia's and his past will come to haunt him... 9/10



    Gameplay: So we end the original Ace Attorney Trilogy with what many consider the best game in the series, Trials and Tribulations. What we have is a narrative driven piece that is perhaps the most important in the series as it establishes and codifies a lot of the lore in the AA universe and puts a cap to finishing off nearly everyone's stories. I think it's probably the most polished in the series as it doesn't stray far from it's predecessor and keeps nearly every gameplay element from the last game, but with more variety to it.

    First off is the return of the Psyche-Lock from Justice For All which plays an incredibly important part, especially in the last case. They work exactly the same, so no need to learn anything new. Also returning is presenting character profiles as evidence, which is also nice. The biggest thing about this game is much larger than the last two, with cases being multiple chapters long, and most of them interlinked between characters or a central theme. There's not much more to write here other than there are some genuinely stellar story moments and downright shocking twists and turns this game goes through. It may be the hardest of the original trilogy, but that does not mean it's by any means less excellent. 8/10



    Visuals: As usual, the visuals remain an excellent calling card of the series, with intricate character designs, interesting settings, and plenty of color, it's one of the best looking games on the original Gameboy Advance and even still on the DS. I don't particularly care for the redone artwork on the new releases of the original Trilogy, but they remain faithful to their original ports. Definitely a game worth looking at. I think my favorite character design this game is Dahlia Hawthorne and Sister Iris. 10/10



    Audio: Here comes the point of contention for this game. Many people consider it the best of the original trilogy, but in my honest opinion, it's just not as good as Justice For All or even original Ace Attorney. There's some stellar tracks in this game though worth listening to, like "Pursuit ~ Caught", "Confess the Truth 2004", and even "Courtroom Lounge ~ Unending Prelude", among many others. I'd still call it the weakest of the first three games, however. 9/10







    Final Grade: 9/10

    Final Thoughts:
    What many consider the strongest in the original series I seem to consider the weakest of the three, but taking into consideration that three of the cases are some of the best in the series, I can't say it's necessarily that weak. It has a strong plot, strong characters, and great music. It's a definite must-have for the Ace Attorney fan.

  18. #78
    Justice for Smarks

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barrows Mansion, Romsdalen, Norway
    Posts
    8,054
    Rep Power
    768013
      Country                    Norway

    Re: Grim Reviews Random Games

    Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney
    (Gyakuten Saiban 4)




    Release Date: April 12, 2007

    Console: Nintendo DS

    Developer: Capcom

    Plot: Seven years have passed; in that span of time, much has changed in the world of law. Apollo Justice is a rookie attorney on his first case, and his client? Phoenix Wright. In the seven years that have passed, Phoenix Wright was disbarred from being an Attorney and became a piano player and undefeated poker player. Now, he's once again a defendant in a murder case. Through Phoenix's help, as well as from Phoenix's daughter, Apollo discovers that it was his own mentor, Kristoph Gavin, who killed Shadi Smith, a wandering poker player, instead of Phoenix. However, the backstory behind Shadi, Phoenix, and Kristoph run back to that fateful court case seven years ago... Now working for Wright Anything Company, Apollo hopes to discover what exactly happened to Phoenix Wright and how he became the way he is today... 9/10



    Gameplay: Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney is where the series begins it's trend downwards, and it's here that I will not be reviewing the series much afterwards, as I have not played any of the other games post-Apollo. Much of the gameplay features of the first three games remain unchanged, however, there are a few additions that could be considered "improvements" if you really want to try and justify it. The first of many additions is that of 3D item investigation. If anyone remembers "Rise From The Ashes" from Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, then this would not really be a shocker. However, this was the first game in the series to really explore the idea more, allowing for more variance and further fun in your investigation.

    The second addition is use of the mic and actual investigative tools to discover evidence. In some parts of the game, you will be required to use the mic to blow into to help set up evidence. It's a neat little idea in theory but I've never been big on the DS gimmicks for the most part. If you're like me, it's a tedious addition that doesn't necessarily change up anything drastically, but just creates more to do.

    Another piece added to the game was that of "Crime Recreation Mode" which allows the player to explore the crime scene as it was as it happened, to search for clues. It's a unique concept but isn't used to great effect in the game and unfortunately doesn't appear all that often. The best thing brought to Apollo Justice is its analog to the magatama of Justice For All and Trials And Tribulations: The Perceive System. Since Apollo himself does not carry a magatama, he cannot see Psyche-Locks themselves. Instead, he has his own way of telling when a witness is lying. The Perceive System allows Apollo to observe the witness and make note of their nervous tics and whatnot, like a poker tell. When considering this is the replacement for the Magatama, it's not a bad idea, in actuality and it's one of the things that makes Apollo more unique to Phoenix Wright.

    Overall, there's not many big changes to the series and with a few additions here and there, the series starts to move further away from the pure visual novel storytelling that made the first three games unique and it starts to really become a proper detective game. Not that there's anything wrong with that, mind you, but some of these additions were not all that well implemented, making it tough to really say they made the Ace Attorney series better. 8/10



    Visuals: We continue with stellar visuals and incredible colors in the Ace Attorney series. Apollo Justice has some finely detailed sprite-work with many of the characters and the environments are gorgeous as usual. Even better are the cutscenes in-between cases, rendered in sketch-like art with incredible effect. It's some of the nicest looking character sprites in the series and my favorite is probably Trucy, seen below. More of the same, but still incredible. 9/10



    Audio: Once again, more of the same from Capcom when it comes to good soundtracks for the Ace Attorney series. While not as great as the last three, there are still plenty of great tracks to have a listen to. I think "Cross Examination ~ Moderate 2007" "Trucy Wright ~ The Magic Girl" are the best in the game, but there are still plenty of other very good songs in here like, "Kitaki Family" and "Ema Skye ~ Scientific Detective". 8/10








    Final Thoughts: Apollo Justice is a good entry-point for newcomers of the series, it has some great storytelling throughout and you don't need prior knowledge of the series before hand to play it. However, it's frankly not as good as the original Trilogy, but is a fun romp in the world of Ace Attorney.

    Final Grade: 8.5/10

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •