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Thread: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

  1. #21
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    I'll get on both of those requests asap. In fact, I've got a little schedule figured out for the reviews already requested. It looks a little something like this....

    The Hunt
    The Hunt
    The Hunt
    The Hunt
    The Hunt

    The Hunt will be up tomorrow, The Hunt on either Saturday or Sunday and the others will all be up early next week.
    Hey fooj, I noticed some errors, don't worry though, I cleaned it up for you.

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    FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I'd like to make a somewhat big request and if you don't feel like it no worries. Could you review all 6 of PT Anderson's films? I don't think you reviewed any of them in your old thread. It could be a PT Anderson week like you did with QT.

    Also I've been meaning to check out The Hunt since like 'Nam.

    Spoiler:


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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I second the PT Anderson request.

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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I request again Silence of the Lambs.

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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I'll add everything to the list.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Also the thread title is tits. I didn't notice it earlier.

    Spoiler:


  7. #27
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Opera


    A young, insecure opera singer named Betty is thrust into a lead role in Verdi’s Macbeth after the woman she understudies is hit by a car. During her first performance, a murder takes place in one of the private boxes. Soon afterwards, Betty is accosted by the killer and forced to watch her lover murdered. At the same time, Betty has horrible nightmares about her mother. Can the killer somehow be connected to these nightmares and, if so, can Betty discover how before it’s too late?


    Dario Argento’s Opera, released in 1987, may very well be the last solid film that the man directed. After a career loaded with brilliant films (Suspiria, Proffondo Rosso, Tenebre just to name a few), it represents a somewhat bittersweet end. Oh, he’s not dead or anything, don’t worry. In fact, he just released a new film this year, though you’d do well to avoid it, much like you’d do well to avoid the majority of his works over the last 20 years. Yes, even the greats eventually fizzle out and die, and while Argento is unfortunately no exception, we still have a solid body of work to remember him by. That brings us back to Opera, a sort of “Greatest Hits” of Argento’s career and a suitable send off in case he never makes another good film. While the plot is your standard giallo fare (black gloved killer, ultra-violent imagery), it manages to succeed where many others fail, mainly because of Argento’s capabilities and sensibilities as a director. He may have been going through a particularly rough period of his life which included a break up from long-term partner Daria Nicolidi and the death of his father, but Argento brought his A-game to this project. In the end, it serves as a reminder of how great he was and will forever stand as one of his most accessible films.



    "Talk about bringing down the house!"

    Argento directed and wrote the screenplay along with frequent collaborator Franco Ferrini. When the film began, I thought it was going to end up being a fairly straight-forward reimagining of The Phantom of the Opera, but it quickly turns off in another direction and becomes something so much more. With a more underdeveloped script that doesn’t feel the need to try and trick the audience at every turn; the characters are allowed a much greater chance to be fleshed out. At the same time, these same characters interact with each other and the world they inhabit quite well and indeed I feel this is the best Argento has ever handled his actors. As far as the filming goes, it’s full of the requisite amount of vivid colours and long tracking shots that Argento is well known for. In fact, at times I felt the tracking shots were almost a little too prevalent. I really didn’t need to see a close up of an 80’s cassette deck multiple times, but I got it anyway. On the other hand, there’s a brilliant bird’s eye view shot towards the end and some very unique camera angles that we’ll be looking at eventually. As the film takes place in only two main locations (the opera house and Betty’s apartment), he spent a lot of time framing everything to look perfect and it shows to great effect. Suffice to say, if you’re a fan of Argento’s style, there’s more than a little something for you here to enjoy.



    "Not the kind of green room that most people would want to be in."

    While the direction and story hits a lot of high points, I’m sad to say that the same is not true of the acting. It has been documented that Argento and lead actress Cristina Marsillach did not get along well on the set, and echoes of that tension seem to come through in her performance. Well, either that or she’s just not a very good actress, take your pick. Unfortunately, that becomes a problem given that she’s in nearly every scene of the film. She does have some good moments, particularly when working with co-star Ian Charleson, but she really falls apart towards the crucial reveal at the end. This diminishes some of the power of the story itself and kind of leaves the film on a sour note, which clearly wasn’t the intention. Speaking of Charleson though, he turns in his usual solid performance and even made me forget for a time that he was in the awful Chariots of Fire! Other strong performances come from Urbano Barberini as the requisite policeman character, Argento’s ex, Daria Nicolidi as Betty’s manager and William McNamara as Stefano, an ill-fated stagehand. While these performances may be good, the less than stellar dubbing is most certainly not, and it becomes a big distraction from the story. I realize these things can never be perfect, but it’s particularly annoying here and that’s never a good thing.



    "Now that's what I call a sight for sore eyes."

    If you’re mainly an Argento fan due to his over the top murder sequences, you’ve definitely come to the right place. In Opera, the kills are, for the most part, typically inventive and brutal. There's one scene where a woman has pins placed under her eyelids, forcing her to keep her eyes open while the killer repeatedly stabs her lover. Argento repeats this twisted form of torture again in the film and while it happens soon after, the effect is not diminished. There's also an excellent sequence featuring a bullet firing through a door peephole that is up there with the best he's ever done. The fact that the killer accomplishes two goals in this sequence (no spoilers but it’s a pretty awesome sight) just makes it that much cooler. This is the type of Argento that I signed up for and as per usual, he doesn't disappoint. What does disappoint, however, is the pretty awful soundtrack. Normally Argento’s films feature brilliant music that fits the imagery perfectly. Here Claudio Simonetti’s heavy metal themes seem totally out of place, particularly when juxtaposed with the beautiful Verdi music that plays several times. I’m honestly baffled by both Argento and Simonetti’s decision to use it and at the end of the day it sticks out in my mind as something really odd about the whole film. Overall though, Opera is an excellent example of Argento at his finest, as he uses every trick in his bag to churn out what seems, unfortunately, to be his final masterpiece. 7/10.



    "Next time, a little lie can cause a lot of damage when it comes from the mouths of babes."


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    A fair enough review. I did enjoy it, but it just didn't seem as great as my all-time favorite, Phenomena.

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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Quote Originally Posted by Grim Reaper View Post
    A fair enough review. I did enjoy it, but it just didn't seem as great as my all-time favorite, Phenomena.
    I think I liked it more than Phenomena, but I haven't seen it in years so it's hard to remember. One thing's for sure, it's not on the level of Suspiria or Proffondo Rosso, but I'd say it's about even with Tenebre.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    I think I liked it more than Phenomena, but I haven't seen it in years so it's hard to remember. One thing's for sure, it's not on the level of Suspiria or Proffondo Rosso, but I'd say it's about even with Tenebre.
    No Argento work in my opinion is of the level of perfection as Profondo Rosso.

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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    The Hunt


    Lucas is a kindergarten teacher in a small Danish community. While he lives a lonely life, divorced from his wife and estranged from his son, he nevertheless is well respected and beloved by the children in his charge. Things begin to look up for him when he enters into a new relationship and receives good news from his son. However, an innocent lie is about to change all that and leave Lucas shunned by the community that once accepted him.


    The Hunt, also known as Jagten, is a Danish film that tackles a very difficult subject matter; the irreparable damage done to an individual when he is accused of an unspeakable crime. Although the individual in question didn’t actually commit the crime and we the audience are aware of that, we’re still forced to watch as others take the law into their own hands and mete out their brand of mob justice. We, like the main character, are powerless to stop this and so must simply sit back and live through it, as painful and demoralizing as it is. There is no shortage of moments where we want to scream at the characters in the film that they should be paying more attention or stop rushing to judgment. Alas, we cannot, and so instead we just have to come to terms with the fact that our voice, like that of the main characters, has been muted, forgotten in a setting of mass hysteria brought on by something as small as one lie. The Hunt is a film that will force you to ask yourself questions that you may never have thought of before, a film that will force you to challenge yourself to answer those questions and, ultimately, a film that will resonate with you long after it’s over.



    "What a tangled web we weave...."


    Thomas Vinterberg directs and writes the film, along with Tobias Lindholm, who he had collaborated with previously on the 2010 film Submarino, which was my first exposure to his work. While the subject matter of that film couldn’t be more different than this one, Vinterberg’s style and understanding of characterization remains the same. He’s not just a director who casts great actors; he manages to get something more out of them than perhaps even they thought possible. He’s also quite adept at accurately portraying the mood that’s occurring at any moment in the film, which is crucial here in maximizing the emotional potential of each scene. From an early moment of camaraderie and a symbolic cleansing through to a powerfully charged confrontation in a church, there isn’t an emotion spared and by the end, you should probably feel a bit like a punching bag. Indeed, even the final scene does nothing but leave you with even more doubts and sadness, crushed by the enormous weight of the events that you’ve just seen unfold. I cannot overstate enough how brilliant Vinterberg’s direction is here and I’m not surprised in the slightest that he has received numerous awards for his work, as has the film itself and several of its actors.



    "A Portrait of the Artist as a Broken Man."

    Mads Mikkelsen, (known mostly to US audiences as Le Chiffre from Casino Royale or Hannibal Lecter in the current Hannibal television show) portrays Lucas and it is simply one of the best performances I have ever seen. I’ve always been fascinated by the man’s work, but here he takes it to an entirely different level. An actor’s chief ability is to make the audience both identify with and understand their character. Mikkelsen doesn’t just achieve that, he makes you feel what he’s feeling, through subtle changes in his intonation and facial expression. While I understand the US mentality towards nominating foreign actors for Oscars, I definitely feel that he was snubbed at the Academy Awards this year. Thankfully he was recognized at both the Bodils (Danish Oscars) and at Cannes, winning Best Actor at both. His co-star, Susse Wold, also won at Cannes and turns in a very convincing performance as one of his accusers. The rest of the cast are also strong, particularly Thomas Bo Larsen as Lucas’ conflicted friend Theo and Annika Wedderkopp as Klara, Theo’s daughter and the catalyst for the events in the film. As far as child actors go, she is easily one of the best I’ve ever seen, which is also a testament to Vinterberg’s ability to get the very most out of all of his performers.



    "Who goes there? Sadly, it doesn't matter."


    The lyrics to the Van Morrison song Moondance, which opens the film, are quite symbolic in retrospect. That song is about the fall, the change of seasons and all the new wonder it brings. The Hunt is also about a fall and a change, and just like the shift from summer to fall, it is a cold one. Cold for Lucas, who is powerless to deal with the events that are suddenly happening to him and cold for the community, who were once warm to Lucas. Without going into too much detail, Lucas’ life is made a living hell from the moment he’s accused of something he didn’t do until the very end when he realizes that it’s never going to go away. On the way he faces public humiliation, vigilante justice against those close to him and even a beating when he’s simply trying to buy food. Through it all, Lucas remains defiant as he believes that he’ll be exonerated. It’s only after something terrible happens that we see him break down and nearly lose it, although at that point most of us have probably lost it several times already. By allowing us “in” to the story and giving us an outsider’s perspective, Vinterberg has made us the ultimate casual observers. We know everything that’s going on yet at the same time we can’t influence the events unfolding. That’s very painful, as we want nothing more than to shake some of the characters into understanding and belief. Unfortunately we cannot, and so we merely watch a man’s life destroyed, most likely for all time, suffering in silence like so many before who are wrongfully accused. The Hunt is moving, captivating, challenging, but above all else, it is real and it is tangible, which makes it one of the most haunting films you’ll ever see. 9/10.



    "Next time...tell them Johnny Wadd was there."



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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







  12. #32
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    So, what in your mind, if I might ask, would've pushed it into the "10" territory?

    For me personally the film was so evocative, that I find it hard to push out of my mind, even when it's got nothing to do, both the message and the portrayal are so well done, it's a masterpiece of film, and would be one of my first choices if some random kid ever asked me how to make the audience almost hate themselves after watching the movie.

    Well done review, everyone if you haven't seen The Hunt, you're a **** go watch it.

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    FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    There were a couple of minor things I noticed on my second viewing that dropped it from being perfect, for me at least. For one, I was kind of annoyed at the line about kids not lying that is used after the questioning. Any parent or educator can tell you that kids are, for the most part, constantly attempting to stretch the boundaries of truth. Grethe should have been aware of this and given a little more thought to Lucas' side of the story. Obviously this couldn't happen for the sake of the plot, but it still seemed a bit unrealistic to me, particularly given Lucas' standing in the community prior to the lie.

    The other thing was Lucas tossing out his girlfriend. I just couldn't figure out the motivation for that, especially considering she said she believed him.




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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Wonderland


    After a brutal murder takes place at a known drug den, police begin to put the story together after questioning a man who frequented the home. He tells them that he knows why the murders were committed and, more importantly, who was most likely a suspect. The name he gives them is John Holmes, a widely known porn star with a bad drug habit and a long list of disreputable friends. When the police question Holmes, they find his story of the events differs from the other mans, and must attempt to piece the two tales together to determine what really happened.



    "Are you ready for the big ride baby?"


    Wonderland, released in 2003, is one of those Rashomon-style films that attempt to tell a story through the perspective of multiple characters. While a lot of these are misfires that could never hope to match the strength of the original, Wonderland succeeds because it goes about things in a totally different way. Rather than try and use characters of differing moral compasses, it looks at only one type; the seedy. Sure they all have different motivations for why they’re telling their version of the events related, but each and every one of them is a bad person, prone to deceit and obstruction. Therefore, we the audience can never be sure who to trust, who to support and, ultimately, who to believe. It is this fascinating angle that distances Wonderland a great deal from some of its contemporaries and makes it a film worth watching multiple times. There’s no shortage of information that can be picked up through repeated viewings, giving the film a shelf-life that many others of this type simply don’t have. It’s also a well-acted, written and directed film that should have served as a springboard to stardom for its director. While that has unfortunately not happened, at least we’ll always have Wonderland as an example of not only his fine work, but as one of the finest of a particularly difficult sub-genre.



    "Don't ever call me Dylan McDonkeydick again!"

    The film was directed by James Cox, who also co-wrote the screenplay along with Captain Mauzner (Factory Girl), Todd Samovitz and D. Loriston Scott. Cox had previously directed the underrated indy film Highway and the short film Atomic Tabasco, which is strikingly similar in tone to Wonderland. However, that film was only 10 minutes and Wonderland is almost two hours, so I wouldn’t have been surprised if he had messed up a little along the way. Nothing could be further from the truth though, as Cox not only expertly handled the multiple character perspectives but kept the film paced so well that it never seemed to let up. That he was able to do this well with such little experience is remarkable and a real sign of the talent he has. There are a lot of chances for this film to go off the rails and Cox manages to keep it moving steadily towards the inevitable conclusion, as unfortunately dissatisfying as that may be. Yes, that’s right, the film ends on a pretty down note as nobody is ever really busted for the crimes depicted, but that’s the way it happened in real life too, so at least the filmmakers are being accurate. Would I have preferred a fictionalized outcome and a “happy” ending? Nope, because most of these people don’t deserve that and I certainly wasn’t rooting for them to get it. Cox and his writers obviously thought so as well and so they simply tell their story and throw up a post-script. It doesn’t get much better than that when dealing with true events on film, so again I have to commend Cox on showing the kind of restraint normally only seen by much older and wiser directors.



    "Seems like an odd way to brush one's teeth but hey, what do I know?"

    In any successful Rashomon clone, the acting is paramount to its success. There’s just no way to get around bad acting when you’re attempting a story arc of that type. Thankfully, the cast in this movie proves up to the challenge and really enhances the script they have to work with. Val Kilmer takes the lead as John Holmes and while I’ve long been a fan I must still give him extra credit here. Honestly, this is one of his strongest performances as he simply oozes the sleaziness of the man Holmes must have been by this point in his life. You can see the desperation in his eyes as he finds himself in way over his head, but you can also tell that behind his outward façade lies a man whose wheels are always turning. Holmes knows how to lie and manipulate and, before the film is over, he’ll have done it numerous times to numerous people; it’s simply his nature and he cannot escape it. Kilmer is excellent but he’s just the beginning as the entire supporting cast is off the charts. Lisa Kudrow has a great turn as Holmes’ estranged wife while Dylan McDermott (who I’ve never really liked) is fantastic as David Lind, one of the survivors of the murders (he wasn’t there at the time) and Holmes chief accuser. There are also strong turns from Kate Bosworth as Holmes girlfriend, Eric Bogosian as Eddie Nash, a drug dealer and acquaintance of Holmes and Josh Lucas as Ron Launias, gang leader and one of the murder victims.



    "No amount of water will wash off a filthy life."


    Wonderland isn’t the easiest film to get through as its subject matter is not exactly the stuff of family-friendly films. Instead we’re treated to multiple instances of drug use, violence and, of course, death. I thought the constant drug use of the main storytellers was a good move on Cox’s part, not only because it’s true but also because it gives yet another interesting slant to the story. How can we take ANY of these people’s stories at face value when we’re fully aware that they’re not in their right frame of mind? The only reliable observers here are the police (who are on the outside looking in) and Holmes’ estranged wife, who would clearly be biased in her retelling of the events. As this is the case, we’re left with no real answers to the questions that the movie poses and, much like the police, are powerless to do anything about it. While that can seem frustrating for us, imagine the position the actual people involved in this case in real life were in? I’d rather not, since I was mad enough that nobody answered for any crimes perpetrated in the film. In real life, John Holmes would eventually die of AIDS, never telling the truth about the story portrayed here. That is a shame, because some closure would have been nice. Unfortunately, in the real world, much like in this film, closure is something that comes at a premium; one that most people cannot afford. 7/10.



    ​"Next time...Flannel Pajamas."


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







  15. #35
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    As big a fan of Kilmer as I am I've never seen this. I needs to fix that asap.

    Spoiler:


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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I am also going to have to look up Wonderland. Kilmer was great in a few of his films and looks like he was good in this one as well. I haven't seen the Hunt either. Looks like two I have to put in my to watch list.


    Good reviews Fuji.

    TEAM CYRUS



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    FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Fuj nailed this review perfectly I prolly would have given it an 8 but still he gets it. While Kilmer who I have never been a fan of is great in this i think Lucas is an absolute powerhouse in this and shows the guy has some acting chops.

    Eric B as Nash is just crazy perfection. Also gonna give Tim Blake Nelson and Ted Levine some love and can't forget Faizon Love who is usually the funy guy but gets down right scary as Nash's right hand man. And yes Death you need to see this. Also I love that version of the poster.

    Hey buddy since it's kind of in the same vain can your also review Star 80?
    Last edited by Booty Vice; 06-03-2014 at 01:07 AM.

    Spoiler:


  18. #38
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Thanks for all the comments guys, they're much appreciated and I'm glad some of you are planning on checking out Wonderland.
    Quote Originally Posted by Professor Booty View Post
    Also gonna give Tim Blake Nelson and Ted Levine some love and can't forget Faizon Love who is usually the funy guy but gets down right scary as Nash's right hand man. And yes Death you need to see this. Also I love that version of the poster.

    Hey buddy since it's kind of in the same vain can your also review Star 80?
    Yeah, I ran out of space to mention them but both were really good in their roles, especially Levine who is so good at distancing himself from the Buffalo Bill character that he played in Silence of the Lambs. I'll get to Star 80 when I find a copy, so probably in the next week or two.

    Also, to Cox, I'll have the Flannel Pajamas review up tomorrow or Thursday. I've watched it but I need a little more time to process my overall feelings.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







  19. #39
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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    I wonder if that means it hit you in the feels

    Or if you hate it and me

    Nash sucks dick

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    Re: FujiFilm Too: Electric Reviewaloo

    Flannel Pajamas


    Stuart is glib and generous, Nicole is shy and forthright. He doesn't like her best friend; she tires of his brother's antics. She wants children sooner. He's a poor listener, she broods. Both have divorced parents, and their families complicate their lives. Is love enough to see them through?



    "Nobody actually sleeps in this film."

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but generally I cannot stand romantic movies. That’s not because I’m a guy and we’re not supposed to be into them, but more because more often than not, they’re totally unrealistic. Think about it, how many times have you seen “boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back by the end, yay” before? It’s simply a genre filled with so much cliché that it’s very hard to find anything to like about it. Of course, it follows that you can imagine my hesitation when I took up the task of looking at 2006’s Flannel Pajamas, a movie that, on the surface at least, appears to mirror all of those movies that I so despise. You can also imagine my surprise when I came to the realization that it was nothing like any of those other movies and by the end I found myself really enjoying its bittersweet portrayal of the harsh realities of the dating world. There’s no such thing as the perfect world created in most Hollywood films, and Flannel Pajamas more than makes that clear throughout. At the same time, it also shows the flaws inherent in people and why they sometimes cannot make their relationships work even though they want them to. Flannel Pajamas may not be the best romantic movie ever made, but it may very well be the most honest.



    "Crazy brothers are always ftw."

    The film is written and directed by Jeff Lipsky and it seems clear to me that it was a very personal project. My only previous encounter with his work was the 2009 film “Once More with Feeling”, which I thought was nothing more than decent. Perhaps that lack of personal feeling made it so, because Flannel Pajamas just bleeds emotional attachment from the beginning to the end. It’s almost as if Lipsky was retelling a story straight out of his own life, because everything in the film is just unbelievably realistic. No Hollywood writer would be able to whip up a script like Lipsky’s, it just wouldn’t have the element of truth that his does. There is a little bit of mundane dialogue, but that’s to be expected because-NEWS FLASH-that’s how people in REAL LIFE talk. By channeling these mundane conversations and putting them into the mouths of normal looking people, Lipsky has essentially created a snapshot of real life and all its beauty and ugliness. His direction is a little slow at times, and I definitely thought a few parts of the film could have been edited down, but at the end of the day he’s trying to distill an entire relationship down to two hours. As this is the case, I’m willing to look past the slow pacing since every moment matters, even if some of them move a lot slower than others.



    "She's not taking a bath...."

    As they’re on-screen for the majority of the film, it’s obviously important that the two leads in the film were not only good actors but also identifiable with the audience. Lipsky managed to nail this on the head as well, as Justin Kirk and Julianne Nicholson are simply dynamite as Stuart and Nicole. This doesn’t mean that they’re entirely likeable either, simply as real as you’re ever going to see in a film of this type. This reality extends to their look, as they don’t come across like Hollywood stars, just ordinary people. Even though I was well aware of both (Kirk from his turn on Weeds, Nicholson for Law & Order: Criminal Intent), I was able to forget about that and just enjoy their organic performances for what they were. Now, with that being said, I didn’t really “like” either of them as both are horribly flawed and closed off, but then again I don’t like a whole lot of people in the real world so it kind of made sense in a weird way. Stuart is way too chatty and doesn’t really care to hear what others think about things, while Nicole is so dull that I’m amazed she isn’t just a selective mute. That being said, they’re still real people in a real relationship and so I found myself captivated by their presence even though I essentially hated both from the beginning. The supporting cast is also strong, with a special mention going to Rebecca Schull as Nicole’s mother. She has an excellent conversation with Stuart that manages to sum up a lot of my own feelings about life and regret and comes across so genuine that I forgot she was acting, which is quite a talent. Jamie Harold as Stuart’s crazy brother and Chelsea Altman as Nicole’s best friend are both great as well.



    "It can only go downhill from here."

    At this point, you’d think I was heaping so much praise on the film that it was bound to get a near-perfect rating from me at the end of the review. Well, unfortunately I cannot go that far, because I found my fair share of flaws hidden within the beauty. First off, Nicole honestly sucked as a human being and while I realize that it was probably the way she was written, I had a hard time looking past it. Seriously, who the hell smokes dope with their friend at their brother-in-law’s funeral? That was bad enough but she just seemed so distant at times that I thought she may have been mildly handicapped. Another thing that bugged me was the odd change in tone between characters that occurred during some of their conversations. There’s one in particular where Stuart is talking to Nicole’s best friend Tess that just flip flop’s all over the place and it becomes very frustrating. Finally there are the final few minutes, which drift into pretentious territory, something that I always hate in films. On the other hand, the film is one of the most honest I’ve ever seen and that honesty is enough to make it worthy of recommendation. In a way, it’s an accurate reflection of the subject matter that it portrays. At times it’s fast, as times its slow, at times it’s great, at times it makes you want to strangle someone; sounds like true love to me. 7/10.



    ​"Next time...there's something in the mist."


    Ask Fuji|2020 Movie Log

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wang Chung
    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







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