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Thread: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

  1. #141
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    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    My girl and I just watched the remake the other day. I actually enjoyed it quite a bit. The ending bothered me a tad bit. Also Ed Burns is in it and I am a pretty big fan of his work.




  2. #142

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Quote Originally Posted by Professor Booty View Post
    My girl and I just watched the remake the other day. I actually enjoyed it quite a bit. The ending bothered me a tad bit. Also Ed Burns is in it and I am a pretty big fan of his work.
    Maybe one day I'll check it out, but it's like, what's the point? I've already seen the original and the actual story has been done a million times before. It's sorta a weird choice to remake as virtually every Japanese horror remake has been the same movie.
    ----

    As a little preview, I've finally decided on how I'll end Fright Fest 4. In past years, I've endured watching three movies on Halloween for mega day. This time around, I will not be doing that again. Instead, without giving it away, I'll be focusing on something a little different, but potentially even more fun. There will be multiple reviews on Halloween though.

  3. #143
    Mr. Victory Through Guts

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    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Even when I was writing the review, the idea of it being in another language being part of the reason why it drags popped in my head. It's certainly possible, but I also feel the Japanese directors purposely pace their moves in such a way where there's down periods to cause the viewer to be lulled into feeling safe before the next scare.
    You're absolutely right on Japanese pacing. and that's what I meant. Like maybe the amount of exposition and "lean" periods of the movie would be less of a chore if you could understand stuff without the added focus of subtitles.

    Agree on your feelings of American remakes as well.

  4. #144
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    As far as subtitles go in movies, they don't hinder me from watching them. If I actually enjoy a movie or am interested enough to keep up and pay attention then the subtitles don't effect my feel of the pace or anything else. To me it's just like watching any regular movie that's on English.

    However, if I'm not too interested I can see what you mean with a different language giving you an off pace.




    Spoiler:



  5. #145

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Personally, I prefer watching a foreign movie with subtitles. The only times I choose to listen to the dubbed English track (Even if most of the time, it sounds really weird) is if I'm watching a movie during a meal.

  6. #146
    Mr. Victory Through Guts

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    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    I enjoy watching dubbed movies for comedic value only, since I immediately associate it with MXC and getting an hour-long case of the giggles.

  7. #147

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Day #23
    Title: Peeping Tom
    Country: England
    Year: 1960
    Director: Michael Powell




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    Mark Lewis is a socially awkward photographer with a grand secret. In his downtime, Mark is a serial killer who captures his crimes and especially the final moments of his victim's lives on film. As Mark works to complete his documentary on death, he falls for his twenty-one year old neighbor, Helen. While the investigations of the frightful victim's continues, Mark's life becomes complicated in trying to find a balance between the man he wants to be for the clueless Helen and the man with the desires to kill. The only one who seemed to be clued in that Mark should not be trusted is Helen's blind mother. Whether Mark wants it or not, his two lives will be forced to collide as Helen may become Mark's final "Star" in his documentary. Can anyone learn the truth about Mark before it's too late for Helen?


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    Directed by Michael Powell, Peeping Tom may be the single greatest UK fright film. Ironically, it's also a film that killed Powell's career. It's a funny situation where a film can be deemed so obscene that it initially bombs, but as time progresses and society changes, moviegoers have re-examined the film. With their new outlook on life, they're able to see the brilliance of the movie. It's quite a sad tale that such an amazing director was only hailed as such after his career was over and his life was coming to an end. The funniest thing of all (Unless you're Powell or his bank account) is that a very similar movie across the Atlantic premiered around the same period and it and it's famous director become immortalized in film history.


    Mark's view from his camera.

    When you talk about Peeping Tom, it's difficult not to bring up it's American counterpart, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. When you look at the basics of these two 1960 movies, they're pretty identical. They both star a socially awkward male who due to their inability to come off very masculine, others around them do not see them as a threat. That is their great downfall though as both Norman Bates and Mark Lewis have become homicidal maniacs. They both have their "Murderous ways" to thank from their parents. In Norman's case, it was an overprotective mother, for Mark, it was a father who terrorized his young son in the art of fear. While both sets of parents dead, Norman and Mark still live at home and rent out their house (Or in Norman's case, open up his motel to customers) for a little extra cash. While Norman Bates eventually found a love interest who believed in him (Psycho 3's Maureen), Mark had his downstairs neighbor, the young Helen. While they are both completely powerless in their regular lives, the role switches when Norman and Mark uses an inanimate object to find their power (Mark with his camera and Norman with his mother's clothes). Both films have one big thing that it's known for. Psycho introduced the twist ending while Peeping Tom first did the killer POV shot. At it's core, both movies showcases a killer as sympathetic and someone you actually want to see get away with their crimes. It's both funny and depressing that Hitchcock only became a more famous director while Powell's career died from their 1960 film.


    Is it illegal for a man to have sex with his camera?

    If I had to pick a favorite scene, it would be the lead-up to Vivian's death. In an awesome 60's feel, it begins with a long dance scene where Vivian is warming up for her after hours scene with Mark filming it all. While Mark and the audience knows exactly what's going to happen, Vivian's oblivious to the fact that she's dancing and having a ball moments before her death. Mark's entire body language, confidence and formerly social awkwardness is lost. He's completely in the zone and he's like a shark circling his prey. He's doing his best not to scare her away just yet, but he's focused behind his camera. While the culmination of the scene is known from the very beginning (Vivian gets killed) it's still a beautiful payoff. At least for those few minutes when Mark is preparing for his kill and filming it, he's a confident and smooth operating man.


    Forcing the victim to witness their own death.

    While it is very similar to Psycho, Peeping Tom is still a compelling movie that makes use out of every scene. Nearly every scene includes Mark, and it's just a fascinating tale of his backstory, his work as a killer and the reveal of what his documentary is all about - showing a victim's reflection in their final moments to capture the shot of the ultimate fear. If you're a fan of Psycho, you need to check out Peeping Tom for a different take on the emotional turmoil of a character that has been conditioned to kill in order to fulfill their needs. Norman may be completely messed up in the head and believe he is Mrs. Bates, Mark is a guy who knows he's a misguided person and wishes he didn't need to have his fetish for filming death. Yet, Mark is who he is and he will not be satisfied until he finishes filming deaths to complete his documentary. Peeping Tom is a must see movie for all fans of the cinema and the horror genre for which Peeping Tom helped inspire.

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    Grade: A

    Best kill: Vivian

    Fright in Motion:



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    Coming up next, South Korea shows the effects of death in a family.
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 11:42 AM.

  8. #148

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Day #24
    Title: A Tale of Two Sisters
    Country: South Korea
    Year: 2003
    Director: Jee-woon Kim




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    After the tragic death of her mother, Su-mi returns home with her sister, Se-yeon. Their once happy home is now forever tense due to their father marrying their mother's former nurse, Eun-joo. Believing that Eun-joo is the cause of all of their problems, Su-mi naturally rebels. Over the course of the movie, tensions rise with the father being caught in the middle. If the home life wasn't difficult enough, all three females have unexplainable occurrences with the house. Whether it's strange noises or an unknown ghost, this little house have become hell for everyone involved. As the days past, the natural tension will bring on abuse and death. This little tale of two sisters is a grizzly and horrifying one.


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    Written and directed by Jee-woon Kim, A Tale of Two Sisters is South Korea's most well known horror film. Having inspired the 2009 US remake, The Uninvited, A Tale of Two Sisters proves just why you can't beat the original and how South Korea is a country to keep your eye on for all horror fans. The film has everything you expect from an Asian horror film - ghosts, creepy scenes and confusing twists, but it does well in not feeling like a cheap Japanese horror. The biggest positive of the film is just how unsettling and confusing it all is. With Su-mi being the main character, it makes perfect sense for everything to be so bizarre and confusing. Her mindset is completely fucked up and the delusions make for a film where you're never quite sure what you're seeing is really what's going on.


    Sweet dreams...

    At the heart of the film is a common fear for children - the new love interest of a parent trying to take over. The ironic thing about all of the issues stemming from Eun-joo is that they're all in the head of Su-mi. She believes Eun-joo has feelings for her father so she dreams up this world where Eun-joo is now their step-mother. Part of the fun of the movie is that we never know what was truly going on in Eun-joo's head. Did she actually have feelings for Su-mi's father? Was she trying to force her way into the family as the mother's health continued to worsen? We'll never know, but Su-mi's paranoia is a bit over the top, but it's not uncommon.


    Asian horror cliche #2 - What's in the bag?

    Meanwhile, there's a whole question over whether the house was haunted or not. We see this ghost or demon a couple times in the movie, but is it actually there or is it just in someone's head? If it is a ghost, I imagine it's either the mother or Su-yeon. However, if it's either one of them, what's their purpose? Is the ghost some poor soul that is trapped between worlds due to the despair they felt in it's death or is it out for vengeance against Eun-joo due to her lack of effort to save Su-yeon? Regardless, the initial scene with the ghost is fucking terrifying. Just the start of the ghost scene was scary enough with waking up in the middle of the night and seeing a head crawling behind a chair. Once the ghost fully comes out, it's amazingly scary and had I had that dream, I wouldn't have been able to sleep for ages! That night scene was my favorite scene of the movie.


    Good luck finding a life line.

    My favorite character of the movie would be Eun-joo...well...Su-mi's delusions of Eun-joo. She's a great mix of an evil bitch, a woman who's desperate for things to work out and someone who just doesn't realize nor accept that she's trying too hard. The dinner scene with her brother and his wife is hilarious. It's beyond awkward with Eun-joo telling anecdotes while everyone else is not reacting to any of the jokes. Meanwhile, there's Eun-joo unable to contain herself in fits of laughter. Her moments of evilness is highlighted when Eun-joo goes berserk on Su-yeon after Eun-joo finds her dead bird in Su-yeon's bed. The scene would be quite disturbing if it wasn't for the fact that both characters are in the head of Su-mi. You know you have some severe mental problems when one personality is abusing another while your main personality waits for it to be over before she consoles the victim personality. Even though Eun-joo may be a character based on the delusions of a teenage girl, she's one of the better evil women in horror. Even better is the fact that you can understand why her mental state is so fragile, even if you love hating her for it.

    Overall, A Tale of Two Sisters was one of the better horror films from 2003. With it's creepy atmosphere, memorable characters and some downright frightening scenes, it's a must see for any fans of foreign horror. Thanks to how confusing parts of the movie is, the film has some good replay value. Over time, you'll be able to figure out your own interpretation of the film and it's twists.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Grade: B

    Best dinner party scene ever.

    Fright in Motion:



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    Coming up next, Italy showcases why living in an apartment building can be very bad for your well being.
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 12:10 PM.

  9. #149

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Day #25
    Title: Demons 2
    Country: Italy
    Year: 1986
    Director: Lamberto Bava




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    A high rise apartment building will never be the same after a broadcast of a horror movie hits the airwaves. When a demon from the movie comes through the screen, he kills and infects the birthday girl. From there, the girl transforms into a demon, to the shock and horror of her party guests. With all of them becoming demons, the entire building is now in trouble. Watch as the rest of the building including a young boy home alone, a group of fitness fanatics, a family watching the horror movie, a young couple who's expecting a baby, random adults there for a cheap lay and others battle it out with demons in order to survive and not become demons themselves. Can anyone survive or will the entire apartment be transformed into homicidal demons?


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    In some ways, Demons 2 is the ultimate example of everything that is right with the horror genre. It's a movie that is just thrown together without much logic. Instead, creators of the original Demons (Writer Dario Argento and director Lamberto Bava) came back together to come up with a quick idea to bring back the demons and their gory killing ways. Forget about trying to scare audiences, the biggest reason why people love horror is because the movies are fun. They don't need nor are they normally judged on how well of a crafted film they are. Rather, a great horror film is normally judged by the laughs you create and how much you enjoy watching some senseless killing. Real life is already dramatic and serious enough, sometimes it's fun just to have a laid back splatter flick.


    No longer man's best friend.

    Part of the comedy of the film comes from how little a lot of it makes sense. After the dramatic ending of the first film, Argento and Bava decided to forget about it and just create a different, but fairly similar tale for it's sequel. In the first film, they went to the trouble of setting up this elaborate story of a secret movie showing with demons masks that can turn people to create the title characters. Here, the first demon comes into the location simply by being a demon in a movie and coming through the TV. How fucking simple is that? It's amazing that characters like Jason or Dracula has never returned in a sequel in such a manner. From there, it's a matter of the demons going after and killing every group of characters in the film until the sole survivors make it out alive. No, you will not need to have your thinking cap on while watching Demons 2. Instead, you just need to prepare for gore, plenty of deaths and loads of blood.


    In just a few years time, we will see her naked. Yes, it's very creepy seeing Asia Argento as a kid.

    I suppose if there's one flaw to having such an illogical script, it's the fact that there's too many characters. Due to that, the viewer goes long periods of time without seeing certain characters. Once the killings goes into overdrive, the characters get thinned out enough that we're not missing characters for long, but I have to question why they needed so many groups in the first place. There's three groups that I'm clueless as to their importance. There's a foursome of hoodlums, who spend the entire movie driving to the party. Another are the parent's of a little boy who's home alone during this demon outbreak. Lastly, there's a geeky party guest who's waiting outside of the building for the hoodlums. All of their scenes (And there's a lot of repetitive scenes of just driving or waiting around) builds up to a minor car crash between the hoodlums and the parents. We never see anything from the three parties again. What's their purpose? Fuck if I know. Having to worry about so many characters also created a plot hole in regards to the outcome of the young Ingrid (Played by film debut of Asia Argento). Last we saw of her, she was locked in a car in the basement of the building with the demons running back up the stairs. Did she live? Did she eventually become a demon? Did she just die of smoke inhalation? We never know and that's a bit frustrating since they went out of their way to show that she hadn't been killed on screen.


    I don't care if it wants to turn me into a demon, he's such a cute little fucker.

    Looking past those flaws, it seems clear that Bava and Argento had a lot of fun making Demons 2. Rather than just making a complete clone of the original, they added a few new additions to help the sequel stand out. Ever wanted to see what a dog transforming into a demon looks like? We see it here. How about a young boy who's a demon? Yup. There's even a cute little Gremlin-like Demon that bursts through the chest of the boy demon. In addition, there's a pregnant woman in the film who gives birth to a...you guessed it...a non-demon baby. Okay, so you were expecting a demon baby, eh? It's a bit disappointing that the baby was normal, but I sorta liked that it was because it wasn't what I expected. From top to bottom, Demons 2 is just a giant excuse for two of Italy's best horror creators to put another fun splatter film on the big screen. I love it for all of it's flaws and cheap tactics.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Grade: C

    Favorite demon: Gremlin demon

    Fright in Motion:



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    Coming up next, Germany brings us a man who creates life to protect the Jews. How ironic.
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 11:58 AM.

  10. #150

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Day #26
    Title: The Golem
    Country: Germany
    Year: 1920
    Director: Carl Boese and Paul Wegener




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    In a little village in Prague, a respected Jewish Rabbi senses danger for his village. Based off of ancient myths, he devises the plan of creating a Golem, a giant made of clay, to ensure that his village will remain safe. As it just so happens, the king has decreed that due to their black magic, the Jewish community must all leave their little village. Thanks to his scary looking Golem, the Rabbi manages to save his fellow villagers from having to leave. However, after the Rabbi's assistant becomes jealous of love interest's new man, the assistant unleashes the Golem to run the guy away. Little does the assistant know that when the constellations are in the right place, the Golem will turn on it's leader and mayhem will ensue. Can the little Jewish community withstand the abomination of a Golem having it's run on the village?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------


    Released the same year as the masterpiece that is The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, The Golem is another German expressionist film that has sustained the test of time. I suppose if you're going to describe it, it's the Jewish take on what Frankenstein's monster combined with King Kong would look like. The Golem creature reminds me a lot of both legendary characters. Like Frankenstein's monster, the Golem was created by man (In this case, clay instead of dead body parts). Despite some rage issues, he has a bond with children that soothes the big lug's heart. Like King Kong, he's attracted to beautiful women and even kidnaps one by carrying her out of the village. At the same time, all three characters are misidentified as villains when they're not really. The Golem creature does not have any control over it's actions. It isn't his fault that the spell gets all funky when Uranus crosses a certain location to cause the Golem to turn on it's master.


    Well look at that, Mr. Freund involved in another Fright Fest movie.

    Unlike it's counterpart, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, there's less of an emphasis on bizarre sets and shadows. Instead, the creators of the Golem focused on the lighting and the special effects. Throughout the entire movie, the camera has a few different color lenses. There was red during a fire, some blue, green and a yellow lenses that seemed like the standby for non-Jewish scenes. I imagine both the blue and green lenses have a purpose as well, but I wasn't able to pick it up. Meanwhile, the special effects are pretty nifty for such an early movie. The effects may be overly simple, but where else could you see demon heads floating in the air and lightning in 1920? All of these special effects from this time period amazes me because special effects was still a brand new thing, in addition to motion pictures.


    The awesome special effects for 1920.

    With this being 1920, the Jewish elements of the film intrigues me. Just the idea of a Rabbi predicting gloomy days ahead for the Jewish community to be rather scary when you realize that the movie is from Germany and Hitler was already building up support in the political world. Meanwhile, there's some Anti-Semantics ideas in the movie. Now granted, I'm not Jewish nor do I know a whole lot about the different sects. The idea that there's some Jewish Rabbi's that can perform black magic and the only ones who are nice to the Golem are Christians? I don't know, that sounds a bit fishy...


    That's an understatement...

    I do think that if there's a common problem with some silent movies, it's the time length. From what I gather, there's two versions of this film. There's an eighty-five minute version (One I watched) and there's a sixty-eight minute version, which I believe the latter to be the original version. It's a pretty simple story and one I don't feel as if it needed to go on for as long as it did. Looking back, I think it's advisable that if you're going to check out The Golem, find a copy of the shorter version. It's worth checking out if you want to see the horror genre at it's beginning, an early legendary creature and some quality early special effects.

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    Grade: C

    Fright in Motion:



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    Coming up next, Spain shows us that Italy isn't the only country to add terror to the idea of being locked in an apartment building
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 12:08 PM.

  11. #151
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    Hey I am curious have you ever seen the 1981 movie Ghost Story with Fred Astaire?




  12. #152

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    I can't say I have. I want to say I came close to before, I believe someone was telling me about it before (Fuji?).

  13. #153
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    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    could very well be...I suggest you check it out...it drags during the flashbacks but is all and all pretty good

    it's on youtube in full
    Ghost Story (1981) - YouTube




  14. #154

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Maybe I'll check it out sometime in November.
    ---------------


    Day #27
    Title: [Rec]
    Country: Spain
    Year: 2007
    Director: Jaume Balagueró




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    TV reporter, Angela is in the middle of filming a video segment behind the scenes at a fire station. In the middle of the taping, the siren goes off and Angela and her cameraman joins the fireman crew to the scene of an apartment building where an elderly woman has collapsed after screaming bloody murder. Little does anyone know that the elderly woman is really infected with a mysterious rage disease that causes her to attack others, infecting them as well. As the first murders take place, Angela, the firefighters and the residents of the building are shocked to learn that the government has locked the building up until they could determine if the disease is contagious. Stuck in a building with an ever increasing amount of blood thirsty crazed people, can Angela survive her most daring of field assignments?


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    Over the course of the mid to late 2000's, regained control as the leader of the most terrifying horror movies going today. For years, some would say decades, the main countries of Europe failed to offer too much of noteworthy additions to the horror genre. Somehow in the mid 2000's, Europe decided to change this with one great horror after another. 2007's [Rec] was one of the films that stood out the most. On paper, it doesn't offer anything new to the genre. A horror based around someone filming it with a shaky cam? Pfft...that's been done since the late 90's. A zombie film based more around the creatures being infected with a rage-like disease? 28 Days Later did that five years earlier. What made [Rec] stand out is the fact that they took a couple of modern horror cliches and they made them scary. Without question, if you want a scary film from the 2000's, [Rec] has to be among the top of the list.


    Yeah, it's sooo difficult watching a movie where most of the scenes contain that face.

    Much like the characters in the film, the viewer is left confused and disorientated by everything that's going on. For the characters, they don't understand why the police have locked them in, why they won't tell them what's going on, what's causing the residents of the apartment building to attack each other or what started it all. For the viewer, the shaky cam and the lack of a backstory leads us into a somewhat unfamiliar ground of knowing as little as the characters in the film. Out of all of the scenes, the final one is what leaves the greatest impression. You feel so uneasy being trapped in the top floor with some sort of creatures in the room with you, but you never have the proper lighting to see them clearly. It's a terrifying feeling knowing you're in harm's way, but there's little you can do to protect yourself.


    The fate of Manu.

    Character wise, everyone came off pretty believable. The mega cute Angela (Played by the...did I mention she was cute, Manuela Velasco) starts off the movie just as you'd imagine some shit reporter, who's only given assignments for segments that no one watches. Yet, she knows her role and she puts on her best cheerful face whenever she talks to someone. It's only in the brief periods when she's alone and talking to her camera man, Pablo, that she's able to voice her real opinion. When the shit hits the fan, it's easier to get behind her because she feels far more real than some girl who's always so excited and enthusiastic, like she only appears with her interview guests. From there, the rest of the cast are filled with cliche stereotypes, but they all make it work. Like something out of a Stephen King novel, the residents of the apartment building are a mixed bag. You have the woman with the sick child who refuses to believe the sickness could be part of the problem, a man who's a ham for the camera, even after everything begins to go crazy, the tough as nails policeman who is an emotional mess, the foreign family that some feel are weird strictly because they're foreign and of course your loyal cameraman who in the face of his mortality, he refuses to ever stop filming. Okay, so there's one character who isn't too believable.


    A sweet little kid in a horror movie? Yeah, she's going to become an infected faux zombie.

    Part of the way I measure how scaritude (Yes, I just coined a new word) is how it affects me after I finish watching it. Immediately after the credits started rolling, I felt the need to turn on the lights because it was too creepy remaining in the dark. Hearing a little noise outside of my house (There's always some noise going on in my neighborhood, I was a little freaked out. [Rec] succeeds because that tense feeling doesn't just go away once the movie is done. It stays with you. [Rec] also has my #1 scare type in any kind of movie. It's a simple scare when a character sticks his head up into an attic and slowly looks around. At the right moment, a person will jump at the camera. It's a cheap scare, but it works every damn time, regardless of how many times I've seen a particular movie with such a scare in it. And that's [Rec] in a nutshell. It's a quality horror film that has scares, stays with you after the movie is finished and regardless of how many times you've seen it, it still accomplishes everything it set out. An easy top 10 movie for the best horrors of the 2000's.

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    Grade: A

    Biggest question at the end of [Rec]: Who was the boy in the attic?

    Fright in Motion:



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    Coming up next, foreign week ends with a trip to Canada where puberty has never been such a drag.
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 11:51 AM.

  15. #155
    Crotchety Old SMOD

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    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Yep, pretty sure that was me that mentioned it before. I planned to watch it this month as well but I got really held up...still, its well worth checking out if you're looking for a more traditional horror film. As for Demons 2, I've always liked it though I prefer the original. I love the fact that the pimp character from the first one is the personal trainer in the second, and you're right about the myriad of things that they bring to the table. The demonic kid is pretty creepy just because they don't normally do stuff like that in movies. I was also going to comment on Peeping Tom but realized I hadn't seen it in awhile so I need to watch it first and I'll get back to you on that one.


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    Fuji- got his hint possibly town but also threatened Cox with a burrito up his ass







  16. #156

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuji Vice View Post
    I love the fact that the pimp character from the first one is the personal trainer in the second
    And both times around, the guy is one of the smarter characters in either movie and both are pretty entertaining. Maybe I'm being racist (Why do you have to compare him to another black guy?!), but the actor reminds me a good deal of Ken Foree.

  17. #157
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    Jim, you were expressing your thoughts on Rob Zombie's movies. What do you think of the Halloween 2 he made? It's on now I'm going to give it a watch.




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  18. #158

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainC View Post
    Jim, you were expressing your thoughts on Rob Zombie's movies. What do you think of the Halloween 2 he made? It's on now I'm going to give it a watch.
    Oh God, the amount of hating I've typed about that film. Let me put it this way, I'm a massive Halloween fan. I saw Rob Zombie's Halloween 1 in the theater two or three times. I saw and thoroughly enjoyed Halloween Resurrection in the theater. RZ's Halloween 2 came around and I wanted to leave the theater within the first ten minutes. If I had to pick a horror film I wish I could erase from the history of mankind, it would be RZ's H2.

  19. #159
    stressed but chillin

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    I didn't get to start off from the beginning but I've been able to watch most of it. It's about to end. A problem I've noticed is just things that seem to not belong inserted within the film such as certain edits, effects, and a few other things.




    Spoiler:



  20. #160

    Re: Fright Fest 4 - Straight to Video Hell

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainC View Post
    I didn't get to start off from the beginning but I've been able to watch most of it. It's about to end. A problem I've noticed is just things that seem to not belong inserted within the film such as certain edits, effects, and a few other things.
    The movie is literally a cinematic abortion. I own every Halloween movie, some I've bought and re-bought and re-bought, yet, I still haven't bought RZ's Halloween 2.
    ---

    This does not count as an actual day of Fright Fest, but consider this a "Mini-review":

    Title: [REC] ²
    Country: Spain
    Year: 2009




    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Taking place just fifteen minutes after the events of [Rec], comes it's sequel. The idea is simple, after lack of communication inside of the apartment building, the ministry of health along with four SWAT officers enter the apartment. Little do the SWAT team members realize that the guy in charge is actually working with the church and the sole reason why they're there is to collect a blood sample of the original infected victim (The one who pulled Angela away at the end of [REC]). Over the course of the movie, the viewer learns more about the disease, it's religious significance, who the boy in the attic was and the fate of the ultra hot Angela.


    The fate of Angela...

    I've heard some speculate that [REC] ² is better than the original, but that's a pretty outlandish claim. The original was great and terrifying, the sequel was merely fun and interesting. The first half of the movie felt more like a video game than a movie. The biggest difference is that [REC] ² feels like a cross between [REC] and The Exorcist. We learn that the infected aren't faux zombies, but really demons. Most of the characters are pretty forgettable, but the moment of Angela's return was pretty epic. Kill wise, the creators seemed a little more reliant on using CGI than practical effects. While I dug the religious tones of the movie (Hey, it's one way to not make it feel like you're just watching [REC] again), I didn't like some of the religious hidden locations located in the penthouse. The idea that there's another dimension, of sorts, when you turn off the lights makes the plot unbelievable. As out there as the plot of the original film was, it's not completely impossible for it to happen. But invisible bathtubs? Meh. Really dug the ending, even if it's a horror cliche. Personally, I'm just a huge fan of a cute girl ending up being the most evil one of all. If you're a huge fan of the original, check out this sequel. However, it's an inferior sequel to a movie that never needed a Part 2 in the first place.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Grade: C
    Last edited by Jim; 09-28-2017 at 12:25 PM.

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